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My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

Dr. Andrew Stotz, CFA

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My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

My Worst Investment Ever Podcast

Dr. Andrew Stotz, CFA

5
Followers
3
Plays
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About Us

The mission of My Worst Investment Ever Podcast is to share stories of loss to keep you winning. In our community, we know that to win in investing you must take the risk, but to win big, you’ve got to reduce it.  Andrew Stotz, Ph.D., CFA, is the CEO of A. Stotz Investment Research, a company that provides institutional and high net worth investors with ready-to-invest stock portfolios that aim to beat the benchmark through superior stock selection. To find more stories like this, previous episodes, and resources to help you reduce your risk visit myworstinvestmentever.com.

Latest Episodes

Tom Libelt – When You Face the Choice of the Easy or Hard Way Take the Hard Way

Tom Libelt was born in Communist Poland and escaped to the US when he was 11 in the early ’90s. At 9, his father sold products at soccer stadiums in Eastern Europe, where he learned the hard way how to sell and how not to be hustled. He is hyper-focused on helping course creators market their online courses. “Becoming a big fish in a smaller pond often is not only more profitable but will make your life easier.” Tom Libelt Worst investment ever In his early 30s, Tom was running a reasonably successful SEO business. Back then, it was easy to rank on Google using what people today consider as blackhat methods. Tom would pay bloggers to get backlinks. Tom had a team of 14 writers at the time, spending a lot of time, money, and effort getting into these blogs. Their goal was to get 50 backlinks pointing to a website every month to keep it ranking higher. While he had other tactics, this model worked the best. Google gets smart After riding the wave for a long while, Google smartened up and was out for businesses doing shady stuff. Google destroyed almost all the blackhat networks. They looked at IP addresses and de-indexed them. Thousands of SEO companies were pretty much back to square one. Tom now had a massive team of writers with nowhere to put the blog posts. Trying option B Tom learned about Amazon Kindle (e-books) at around this time and decided to see if he could make a business out of it. He had a ready team of writers anyway. Tom told his team to pick topics of their choice, do keyword research and write up short books of about 30 to 40 pages, then use images to fill in some gaps and just publish them on Kindle. Competition at the time was little and so getting into Kindle was pretty easy. Striking gold About three months later, Tom’s writers broke even. So he thought this could work. Tom would now sit down with the team for two days, go over hundreds of topics and then pick the best to run with. Eventually, the team was pumping out about 250 books per month, and for about four or five years, the money coming in was quite good. Kindle shakes things up Making money on Kindle was pretty straightforward. You’d get 70% of sales made, and $1 for every book rented. Tom’s business was making a killing by pushing rentals. One day, out of the blues, Kindle killed the rental payment model. Now they would focus on pages read. Turning to blackhat tactics again After the new payment model, Tom turned to a blackhat marketing tactic where he told people in the introduction of the books to skip to the end to get the “Golden Nugget” and then come back to the beginning of the book. So everyone would just go straight up to the end of the book, and Tom would get paid. While this still got him money, it just wasn’t as lucrative. Closing the doors for good Tom’s marketing tactic worked for a while then one day, without any notice, his Kindle accounts got shut down. There was no explanation given, and he was not allowed to appeal the decision. Since Tom had no control over Kindle, there was nothing much he could do than accept the loss and move on. Tom had invested so much in the Kindle business just to have it go away overnight simply because his business model relied entirely on someone else’s business. Lessons learned Easy come, easy go Taking the easier way out may bear you fruit, but it won’t last long. You are better off working hard so that you can reap the fruits longer. Have control over your business Have your own business structure. Don’t depend on other people’s infrastructure. Always ask yourself where the control is? Who owns the control in the situation? If you don’t have control, then it’s not a good business idea. Andrew’s takeaways Build your own assets You have to build your assets instead of relying on others. It’s hard to do this, but it makes your business idea more solid. Know when you are riding a wave There are many ways to make money, and sometimes you will be taken advantage of, but always know when you’re

21 MIN3 d ago
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Tom Libelt – When You Face the Choice of the Easy or Hard Way Take the Hard Way

Wilbert Wynnberg – The Value of a Hedge Fund When an Oil Investment Goes Wrong

Wilbert Wynnberg is an international speaker, award-winning author, and founder of the Think Act Prosper (TAP) Growth Conference. Since 2015, Wilbert has touched the lives of over 100,000 people in more than 20 countries through his seminars, live programs, and award-winning book, THINK. ACT. PROSPER.: How Small Habits Can Lead to Massive Success. “If you want to stay in the investment game for the long term, sometimes you just have to take a short break so that you can enjoy the game.” Wilbert Wynnberg Worst investment ever Wilbert’s worst investment ever happened just a few weeks ago. As a prolific investor, Wilbert has been following the business cycles since the COVID-19 pandemic erupted. He’s been tracking a lot of different indicators, data, and the underlying numbers. He felt that in 2018, a lot of things had kind of picked up, but there wasn’t any reason for him to go in and take any action, whether it be long or short. So he kept watching the market. Ignoring Coronavirus At the start of the year, when Coronavirus started hitting the news, Wilbert at first wasn’t paying much attention to it. He thought it was the US probably overplaying the whole situation. Wilbert decided not to do anything about it unless he had further confirmation. Getting ready to beat the market By February, it was almost inevitable that the market was going to be shaken up. Wilbert could foresee a bear market. And so he started raising money so that he could pounce on the market. As he was raising money, Wilbert was also tracking things like insider trading, whether CEOs were buying or selling companies, what hedge funds were doing, and more. At that point, his research showed him that it was not the right time to buy equities and go into the stock market. So Wilbert waited it out. Taking the market head-on Eventually, Wilbert found out that with this virus and a high unemployment rate, governments will have to start printing money. So he began to look at commodities. Oil prices started coming down as well. Now Wilbert was very confident it was time to invest. At this point, he had raised a decent few million dollars. Oil stocks seemed like a good option, or was it? Brent oil was at about $25, and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) was at about $22. This was a two-decade low. However, everybody believed that oil, unlike Bitcoin, would never go to zero because people need it for everyday stuff. So, Wilbert and his investment team were quite confident and stoked. They thought that this was going to be the trade of the lifetime. So without much further ado, Wilbert entered the position and started buying oil stocks. Falling flat on their faces At some point, Wilbert received an alert saying that Saudi Arabia and Russia were going to cut oil production. So they started buying in. Little did they know that actually, it was just a tweet from President Donald Trump. Oil prices at the time were $22. Prices went up to $32 before coming back down. By April 22nd, prices had plummeted and at some point were at a low of $8 while the oil futures contract went to negative 37 (Yes, people would actually pay you to take delivery on oil). Wilbert decided to count his losses and stopped investing in oil. Lessons learned Everybody is in it for themselves Don’t ever think that there will be a time that you’re genuinely safe, and nothing terrible will happen to your investment. Always make sure you keep checking on how things are going. Everyone else is looking out for their interests. You won’t get the whole picture You’ll never understand everything, no matter how long you’ve been an investor. Be careful about overconfidence bias. The moment you feel that you’ve understood the game in and out, that you know every single ounce of the game, that’s when you have to double-check things. Admit when you’re wrong Most people refuse to admit that they might be wrong after choosing one investment over another. They think that the bad situation is going only to be t

31 MIN6 d ago
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Wilbert Wynnberg – The Value of a Hedge Fund When an Oil Investment Goes Wrong

Kavee Chukitkasem – Gain Knowledge Before You Start Investing

Kavee Chukitkasem is the Deputy Managing Director of Kasikorn Securities and completed his Master of Finance from The University of Toledo, Ohio. Kavee is also a TEDx speaker and is the author of a popular investing book on how to identify great stocks and how to sow the seeds for sustainable long-term results (original title:เพาะหุ้นเป็น เห็นผลยั่งยืน). “It doesn’t matter if you give your money to a fund manager; you still have to know about investing.” Kavee Chukitkasem Worst investment ever Kavee’s worst investment to date happened during the first year of his career. He had just received his first bonus, and all he wanted to do with the money was to invest it. While it wasn’t so much money, Kavee was excited to be able to enter the investment world. At the time, Thailand’s stock index was at 1,700 points, almost the highest it has ever been. A bubble near to burst Around the same time, the Tom Yum Goong Crisis (the Thai name for the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, and also a delicious soup with prawns) was building up in Thailand. Even though the signs were all over, nobody saw the crisis coming. Someone advised Kavee that this was the best time to invest, and he blindly believed him. Even though he was a finance graduate already working as a financial analyst, he put his trust in someone else. He never thought of researching the company he was putting his hard-earned bonus into. All Kavee knew was that he was buying at a high and was convinced the stock would keep going up. He never saw that burst coming Kavee bought stocks at 300 Baht each, but thanks to the Asian Financial Crisis the shares fell to a whopping low of 20 Baht in just three months. Kavee was utterly disappointed in himself because, as an analyst, he should have known better than to invest in a company he knew nothing about. Lessons learned What kind of investor are you? The first thing you need to do before you start investing is to know the kind of investor you want to be. What is your long-term investment goal? Before you start investing learn how it works Whether you’re interested in a long or short investment, you have to know how investing works. You don’t need to understand finance deeply but learn the basics and understand the market. Even if you choose to work with a fund manager, you still have to know about investing. Don’t expect to be an overnight millionaire Investing money for beginners can be exciting. Don’t get too excited and expect a hundred percent return in one year, that hardly ever happens. Give your portfolio time to grow. Don’t follow every investing advice you get There’s always someone out there wanting to force tips on investing for beginners down your throat. You don’t have to follow every piece of advice. Just listen and take into account and think about it by yourself. Andrew’s takeaways People fail to do their research, especially when starting to invest. They just pick the company, invest right away, even though they don’t know much about it. People fail to properly assess and manage risk. Look at your investment before you buy it and evaluate the risk and how to manage it. To reduce risk, you need to have a more diversified portfolio. People are driven by money, emotion, and flawed thinking. Many people lose their money because they trust the wrong people. People fail to monitor their investment. Many people just put their money in something, and then they don’t even look at it ever again. Don’t invest in a startup company, blindly. Actionable advice Get to know the investment first before you invest. It doesn’t matter how much you have to invest, keep your money safe first before you sign to invest anything. Whatever you want to invest in, you have to know it very well. Knowledge is essential before you get in because you can learn a lot, and you’ll invest from the point of knowledge and not ignorance. No. 1 goal for the next 12 months For the next 12 months and beyond, Kavee wants to focus on training Thai people o

25 MIN1 w ago
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Kavee Chukitkasem – Gain Knowledge Before You Start Investing

Robert Seawright – Avoid Overconfidence Bias by Remembering That Randomness Is Everywhere

Robert “Bob“ Seawright is the Chief Investment & Information Officer for Madison Avenue Securities, LLC, an investment advisory firm and broker-dealer headquartered in San Diego, California. Bob’s blog, Above the Market, has received “best of” recognition from a wide variety of sources, including The Wall Street Journal and the CFA Institute, and is the #7 rated advisor blog in the country based upon readership, linkage, and influence. And don’t’ miss The Better Letter Newsletter that he writes about markets and life and comes out every Friday morning. “Good advice wrongly applied isn’t any better than bad advice.” Robert Seawright Worst investment ever Beginner’s luck Bob’s worst investment ever, like for most investors, was when he was starting as an investor. At the time, Bob was working on the fixed income trading floor for a big Wall Street investment house trading bonds all day every day. So what he knew and understood was bonds. Bod had learned from the bigwigs of investing, such as Peter Lynch, to invest in what you know. So Bob allocated his investment money heavily toward bonds. Thanks to beginner’s luck, he did just fine with his bond investments. Missing out on higher returns While Bob never lost any money for investing in bonds, he played too safe and missed out on other investments that he should have made early in his life. Such investments, with compounding they could have had a lot more returns. Luck and randomness have always been his saving grace In the course of his life, Bob has made a few more bad investments that somehow have turned out well for him, thanks to luck. For instance, he bought a house at the wrong time, but as random as this decision was, it turned out great for him. Bob also went against financial planning advice and paid for his kids’ education. Bob had not been able to go to college, where he wanted because his parents didn’t have the money. So it was a very important value for Bob to provide the best education possible for his kids. This is even though he knew that would mean working longer and having less in retirement. Bob knew from an investment standpoint, it was foolish, but he did it anyway. Lessons learned What are you trying to accomplish? Before you start investing, be sure to understand what you’re trying to accomplish. This is important because every investment, even the best investment in the world, has cons as well as pros. So when inevitably, a con period shows up, you’ll be ready and able to handle it. Randomness in investment is more important than you think If you think about your biggest successes, they all happened with a lot of randomness involved. While they almost always happen because you worked hard, and you made good decisions, there’s also randomness playing a big part. It always helps to remember that when things turn out right, there’s always luck involved. A natural love for new shiny things We tend to jump on what we’ve just seen, and we latch hold of what’s available. When someone mentions something new, they’ve primed the pump, and you’re going to respond with what they’ve mentioned way more often than not. So be careful of investing in something just because it’s new and recent to you. Andrew’s takeaways Familiarity bias versus shortfall risk Investors, especially beginners, tend to play it safe by putting their money in something they are familiar with, such as the bank, or maybe bonds. However, there’s a hidden risk associated with playing safe – the shortfall risk. For instance, if you’re going to need $3 million in cash to retire at age 60, and you put your money into bonds, you’re going to feel like you’ve reduced your risk, but in fact, you’ve increased it on the other end through shortfall risk. Everything is a balance When it comes to investing, you can’t have it all. You think you’re safe by doing X, but what you don’t know is that there’s a balance. So while you’re safe, you’re also causing something else to go out of whack. Actionable

18 MIN1 w ago
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Robert Seawright – Avoid Overconfidence Bias by Remembering That Randomness Is Everywhere

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Dan Gramza, David Keller & Dustin Mathews

Current times might be difficult, and the future may seem bleak, but we will make it through. We will survive and thrive. Our past guests share more advice to help us navigate the COVID-19 crisis. Dan Gramza from Ep43 Don’t Let Overconfidence Ruin Your Trading Strategy Dan Gramza is the President of Gramza Capital Management, Inc. He is a trader, consultant to domestic and international clients, an advisor to hedge funds, a developer of ETF/ETC securities, and co-inventor of two issued security patents. He has published works and has appeared on numerous media outlets around the world. We cannot control the social and economic impact of the virus, but we do have total control over how we react to these changes. Your focus should be on your reaction to thrive. Appreciate the restrictions that have come with this virus because they are causing hidden positive changes. This global pandemic has created a common cause that has brought people together locally and globally. This is an opp...

13 MIN2 w ago
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Dan Gramza, David Keller & Dustin Mathews

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Philipp Kristian Diekhöner, Dante Vitoria & Vikas Gupta

Our past podcast guests continue to share with us little pieces of advice that we can all try to maintain and do daily to keep ourselves on an even keel. Hopefully, with this wisdom, we’ll ultimately create a brighter future out of this situation. Philipp Kristian Diekhöner from Ep61 The Impact of Foreign Currency on a Managed Fund Philipp Kristian Diekhöner is a keynote TEDx speaker, global innovation strategist, and author of The Trust Economy, published in English (2017), German (2018), and Simplified Chinese (2019). Philipp has spoken at prominent global organizations such as Facebook, P&G, Microsoft, Turner, Munich Re, Zillow, Globe Telecom, CPA Australia, Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economics and Energy, the Economist Intelligence Unit and many others. We need to understand how we can make agility sustainable. We’re currently experiencing an exciting surge in agility in business. Organizations that are not usually very agile are developing quality responses and solutio...

14 MIN2 w ago
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Philipp Kristian Diekhöner, Dante Vitoria & Vikas Gupta

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Sal Daher, Joe Saul-Sehy & Jack Thomas

Here a few tips from some of our past podcast guests that will help you get through this COVID-19 crisis. These uplifting words of wisdom will help give you a positive mindset and come out of this pandemic stronger. Sal Daher from Ep152 To Win Big as an Angel Investor, You Have to Look at All Angles Sal Daher is an angel investor who invests in technologies that set Boston apart. He is a member of Walnut Ventures and MIT Angels. Sal is a syndicate lead and podcast host at Angel Invest Boston Podcast. Be very careful with your cash, renegotiate your rents, and consider the cost of your headcount. This thing is going to be here for a while; we’re not going to have vibrant economic activity anytime soon. So you have to think long term in terms of preserving your resources. Use the limited resources that you have, in a way that’s economical for you. This will help others and also help your long term survival. Think creatively; you might be able to build value in your enterprise. But r...

11 MIN3 w ago
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Sal Daher, Joe Saul-Sehy & Jack Thomas

Scott Beebe – Write It Down to Gain Clarity and Business Results

Scott Beebe is the founder and head coach of MyBusinessOnPurpose.com and author of Let Your Business Burn: Stop Putting Out Fires, Discover Purpose, And Build A Business That Matters. Scott hosts the Business On Purpose podcast sharing real stories of how he and the team are working with business owners and their key leaders. They’re building systems, process, and purpose using the Business On Purpose Roadmap to liberate businesses from the chaos of working in their business and help them get their lives back. “Where there is no vision, people become detached, people then scatter, and eventually people die.” Scott Beebe Worst investment ever Success as he knew it comes tumbling down in an instant One snowy Friday morning in February 2015, Scott walked into work and walked back home unemployed. He went home, ready to count his losses and figure out how to bounce back. Married with three kids, Scott needed to find his footing again and fast. Taking his side hustle more seriously At...

30 MIN3 w ago
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Scott Beebe – Write It Down to Gain Clarity and Business Results

Daniel Gomez – Forgiveness Is Your Key to Success in Life and Business

Daniel Gomez is an Award-Winning Business Strategist, Corporate Trainer, and Confidence Architect and is the President/Founder of Daniel Gomez Enterprises. Daniel speaks and coaches at events all over the world! His passion is to elevate businesses and entrepreneurs to achieve their true potential through their training and coaching programs. Daniel has empowered his clients to build epic success in their personal and professional lives. He is the international best-selling author of “You Were Born to Fly,” a book written to inspire and give people the high-performance habits and confidence needed to be the leaders of their destiny. “The quality of your life is determined by the quality of the questions you ask yourself.” Daniel Gomez Worst investment ever When anger impedes your success in life Daniel had been living with a lot of anger. This anger saw him sabotage himself and his business. He was full of hate and would barely bring himself to trust anyone, including his client...

19 MINMAY 4
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Daniel Gomez – Forgiveness Is Your Key to Success in Life and Business

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Giacomo Arcaro, Johnny FD & Nicolas Rabener

Three more of our past podcast guests graciously shared some words of advice to help us cope and make the most out of the COVID-19 epidemic. Giacomo Arcaro from Ep113 Don’t Chase the Money Giacomo Arcaro is one of the most important European growth hackers, with more than 140,000 “crypto-followers” and has been featured in the Financial Times, Forbes, Wired, and the Los Angeles Times. He’s had 2-million-euro exits with two start-ups, CercaClienti.it and SocialAutomation.online, and is the founder of Black Marketing Guru. We need to understand that during the COVID-19 crisis, we are going to face a low touch economy where you have to consider a lot of factors. If you have a business based in a small area with a lot of people, you need to reconsider reinventing your business so that it remains standing if this crisis goes for a year or two. One way of reinventing your business, for example, is running it on social media platforms such as Instagram or Facebook Live. COVID-19 has no...

14 MINAPR 30
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Giacomo Arcaro, Johnny FD & Nicolas Rabener

Latest Episodes

Tom Libelt – When You Face the Choice of the Easy or Hard Way Take the Hard Way

Tom Libelt was born in Communist Poland and escaped to the US when he was 11 in the early ’90s. At 9, his father sold products at soccer stadiums in Eastern Europe, where he learned the hard way how to sell and how not to be hustled. He is hyper-focused on helping course creators market their online courses. “Becoming a big fish in a smaller pond often is not only more profitable but will make your life easier.” Tom Libelt Worst investment ever In his early 30s, Tom was running a reasonably successful SEO business. Back then, it was easy to rank on Google using what people today consider as blackhat methods. Tom would pay bloggers to get backlinks. Tom had a team of 14 writers at the time, spending a lot of time, money, and effort getting into these blogs. Their goal was to get 50 backlinks pointing to a website every month to keep it ranking higher. While he had other tactics, this model worked the best. Google gets smart After riding the wave for a long while, Google smartened up and was out for businesses doing shady stuff. Google destroyed almost all the blackhat networks. They looked at IP addresses and de-indexed them. Thousands of SEO companies were pretty much back to square one. Tom now had a massive team of writers with nowhere to put the blog posts. Trying option B Tom learned about Amazon Kindle (e-books) at around this time and decided to see if he could make a business out of it. He had a ready team of writers anyway. Tom told his team to pick topics of their choice, do keyword research and write up short books of about 30 to 40 pages, then use images to fill in some gaps and just publish them on Kindle. Competition at the time was little and so getting into Kindle was pretty easy. Striking gold About three months later, Tom’s writers broke even. So he thought this could work. Tom would now sit down with the team for two days, go over hundreds of topics and then pick the best to run with. Eventually, the team was pumping out about 250 books per month, and for about four or five years, the money coming in was quite good. Kindle shakes things up Making money on Kindle was pretty straightforward. You’d get 70% of sales made, and $1 for every book rented. Tom’s business was making a killing by pushing rentals. One day, out of the blues, Kindle killed the rental payment model. Now they would focus on pages read. Turning to blackhat tactics again After the new payment model, Tom turned to a blackhat marketing tactic where he told people in the introduction of the books to skip to the end to get the “Golden Nugget” and then come back to the beginning of the book. So everyone would just go straight up to the end of the book, and Tom would get paid. While this still got him money, it just wasn’t as lucrative. Closing the doors for good Tom’s marketing tactic worked for a while then one day, without any notice, his Kindle accounts got shut down. There was no explanation given, and he was not allowed to appeal the decision. Since Tom had no control over Kindle, there was nothing much he could do than accept the loss and move on. Tom had invested so much in the Kindle business just to have it go away overnight simply because his business model relied entirely on someone else’s business. Lessons learned Easy come, easy go Taking the easier way out may bear you fruit, but it won’t last long. You are better off working hard so that you can reap the fruits longer. Have control over your business Have your own business structure. Don’t depend on other people’s infrastructure. Always ask yourself where the control is? Who owns the control in the situation? If you don’t have control, then it’s not a good business idea. Andrew’s takeaways Build your own assets You have to build your assets instead of relying on others. It’s hard to do this, but it makes your business idea more solid. Know when you are riding a wave There are many ways to make money, and sometimes you will be taken advantage of, but always know when you’re

21 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Tom Libelt – When You Face the Choice of the Easy or Hard Way Take the Hard Way

Wilbert Wynnberg – The Value of a Hedge Fund When an Oil Investment Goes Wrong

Wilbert Wynnberg is an international speaker, award-winning author, and founder of the Think Act Prosper (TAP) Growth Conference. Since 2015, Wilbert has touched the lives of over 100,000 people in more than 20 countries through his seminars, live programs, and award-winning book, THINK. ACT. PROSPER.: How Small Habits Can Lead to Massive Success. “If you want to stay in the investment game for the long term, sometimes you just have to take a short break so that you can enjoy the game.” Wilbert Wynnberg Worst investment ever Wilbert’s worst investment ever happened just a few weeks ago. As a prolific investor, Wilbert has been following the business cycles since the COVID-19 pandemic erupted. He’s been tracking a lot of different indicators, data, and the underlying numbers. He felt that in 2018, a lot of things had kind of picked up, but there wasn’t any reason for him to go in and take any action, whether it be long or short. So he kept watching the market. Ignoring Coronavirus At the start of the year, when Coronavirus started hitting the news, Wilbert at first wasn’t paying much attention to it. He thought it was the US probably overplaying the whole situation. Wilbert decided not to do anything about it unless he had further confirmation. Getting ready to beat the market By February, it was almost inevitable that the market was going to be shaken up. Wilbert could foresee a bear market. And so he started raising money so that he could pounce on the market. As he was raising money, Wilbert was also tracking things like insider trading, whether CEOs were buying or selling companies, what hedge funds were doing, and more. At that point, his research showed him that it was not the right time to buy equities and go into the stock market. So Wilbert waited it out. Taking the market head-on Eventually, Wilbert found out that with this virus and a high unemployment rate, governments will have to start printing money. So he began to look at commodities. Oil prices started coming down as well. Now Wilbert was very confident it was time to invest. At this point, he had raised a decent few million dollars. Oil stocks seemed like a good option, or was it? Brent oil was at about $25, and the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) was at about $22. This was a two-decade low. However, everybody believed that oil, unlike Bitcoin, would never go to zero because people need it for everyday stuff. So, Wilbert and his investment team were quite confident and stoked. They thought that this was going to be the trade of the lifetime. So without much further ado, Wilbert entered the position and started buying oil stocks. Falling flat on their faces At some point, Wilbert received an alert saying that Saudi Arabia and Russia were going to cut oil production. So they started buying in. Little did they know that actually, it was just a tweet from President Donald Trump. Oil prices at the time were $22. Prices went up to $32 before coming back down. By April 22nd, prices had plummeted and at some point were at a low of $8 while the oil futures contract went to negative 37 (Yes, people would actually pay you to take delivery on oil). Wilbert decided to count his losses and stopped investing in oil. Lessons learned Everybody is in it for themselves Don’t ever think that there will be a time that you’re genuinely safe, and nothing terrible will happen to your investment. Always make sure you keep checking on how things are going. Everyone else is looking out for their interests. You won’t get the whole picture You’ll never understand everything, no matter how long you’ve been an investor. Be careful about overconfidence bias. The moment you feel that you’ve understood the game in and out, that you know every single ounce of the game, that’s when you have to double-check things. Admit when you’re wrong Most people refuse to admit that they might be wrong after choosing one investment over another. They think that the bad situation is going only to be t

31 MIN6 d ago
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Wilbert Wynnberg – The Value of a Hedge Fund When an Oil Investment Goes Wrong

Kavee Chukitkasem – Gain Knowledge Before You Start Investing

Kavee Chukitkasem is the Deputy Managing Director of Kasikorn Securities and completed his Master of Finance from The University of Toledo, Ohio. Kavee is also a TEDx speaker and is the author of a popular investing book on how to identify great stocks and how to sow the seeds for sustainable long-term results (original title:เพาะหุ้นเป็น เห็นผลยั่งยืน). “It doesn’t matter if you give your money to a fund manager; you still have to know about investing.” Kavee Chukitkasem Worst investment ever Kavee’s worst investment to date happened during the first year of his career. He had just received his first bonus, and all he wanted to do with the money was to invest it. While it wasn’t so much money, Kavee was excited to be able to enter the investment world. At the time, Thailand’s stock index was at 1,700 points, almost the highest it has ever been. A bubble near to burst Around the same time, the Tom Yum Goong Crisis (the Thai name for the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis, and also a delicious soup with prawns) was building up in Thailand. Even though the signs were all over, nobody saw the crisis coming. Someone advised Kavee that this was the best time to invest, and he blindly believed him. Even though he was a finance graduate already working as a financial analyst, he put his trust in someone else. He never thought of researching the company he was putting his hard-earned bonus into. All Kavee knew was that he was buying at a high and was convinced the stock would keep going up. He never saw that burst coming Kavee bought stocks at 300 Baht each, but thanks to the Asian Financial Crisis the shares fell to a whopping low of 20 Baht in just three months. Kavee was utterly disappointed in himself because, as an analyst, he should have known better than to invest in a company he knew nothing about. Lessons learned What kind of investor are you? The first thing you need to do before you start investing is to know the kind of investor you want to be. What is your long-term investment goal? Before you start investing learn how it works Whether you’re interested in a long or short investment, you have to know how investing works. You don’t need to understand finance deeply but learn the basics and understand the market. Even if you choose to work with a fund manager, you still have to know about investing. Don’t expect to be an overnight millionaire Investing money for beginners can be exciting. Don’t get too excited and expect a hundred percent return in one year, that hardly ever happens. Give your portfolio time to grow. Don’t follow every investing advice you get There’s always someone out there wanting to force tips on investing for beginners down your throat. You don’t have to follow every piece of advice. Just listen and take into account and think about it by yourself. Andrew’s takeaways People fail to do their research, especially when starting to invest. They just pick the company, invest right away, even though they don’t know much about it. People fail to properly assess and manage risk. Look at your investment before you buy it and evaluate the risk and how to manage it. To reduce risk, you need to have a more diversified portfolio. People are driven by money, emotion, and flawed thinking. Many people lose their money because they trust the wrong people. People fail to monitor their investment. Many people just put their money in something, and then they don’t even look at it ever again. Don’t invest in a startup company, blindly. Actionable advice Get to know the investment first before you invest. It doesn’t matter how much you have to invest, keep your money safe first before you sign to invest anything. Whatever you want to invest in, you have to know it very well. Knowledge is essential before you get in because you can learn a lot, and you’ll invest from the point of knowledge and not ignorance. No. 1 goal for the next 12 months For the next 12 months and beyond, Kavee wants to focus on training Thai people o

25 MIN1 w ago
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Kavee Chukitkasem – Gain Knowledge Before You Start Investing

Robert Seawright – Avoid Overconfidence Bias by Remembering That Randomness Is Everywhere

Robert “Bob“ Seawright is the Chief Investment & Information Officer for Madison Avenue Securities, LLC, an investment advisory firm and broker-dealer headquartered in San Diego, California. Bob’s blog, Above the Market, has received “best of” recognition from a wide variety of sources, including The Wall Street Journal and the CFA Institute, and is the #7 rated advisor blog in the country based upon readership, linkage, and influence. And don’t’ miss The Better Letter Newsletter that he writes about markets and life and comes out every Friday morning. “Good advice wrongly applied isn’t any better than bad advice.” Robert Seawright Worst investment ever Beginner’s luck Bob’s worst investment ever, like for most investors, was when he was starting as an investor. At the time, Bob was working on the fixed income trading floor for a big Wall Street investment house trading bonds all day every day. So what he knew and understood was bonds. Bod had learned from the bigwigs of investing, such as Peter Lynch, to invest in what you know. So Bob allocated his investment money heavily toward bonds. Thanks to beginner’s luck, he did just fine with his bond investments. Missing out on higher returns While Bob never lost any money for investing in bonds, he played too safe and missed out on other investments that he should have made early in his life. Such investments, with compounding they could have had a lot more returns. Luck and randomness have always been his saving grace In the course of his life, Bob has made a few more bad investments that somehow have turned out well for him, thanks to luck. For instance, he bought a house at the wrong time, but as random as this decision was, it turned out great for him. Bob also went against financial planning advice and paid for his kids’ education. Bob had not been able to go to college, where he wanted because his parents didn’t have the money. So it was a very important value for Bob to provide the best education possible for his kids. This is even though he knew that would mean working longer and having less in retirement. Bob knew from an investment standpoint, it was foolish, but he did it anyway. Lessons learned What are you trying to accomplish? Before you start investing, be sure to understand what you’re trying to accomplish. This is important because every investment, even the best investment in the world, has cons as well as pros. So when inevitably, a con period shows up, you’ll be ready and able to handle it. Randomness in investment is more important than you think If you think about your biggest successes, they all happened with a lot of randomness involved. While they almost always happen because you worked hard, and you made good decisions, there’s also randomness playing a big part. It always helps to remember that when things turn out right, there’s always luck involved. A natural love for new shiny things We tend to jump on what we’ve just seen, and we latch hold of what’s available. When someone mentions something new, they’ve primed the pump, and you’re going to respond with what they’ve mentioned way more often than not. So be careful of investing in something just because it’s new and recent to you. Andrew’s takeaways Familiarity bias versus shortfall risk Investors, especially beginners, tend to play it safe by putting their money in something they are familiar with, such as the bank, or maybe bonds. However, there’s a hidden risk associated with playing safe – the shortfall risk. For instance, if you’re going to need $3 million in cash to retire at age 60, and you put your money into bonds, you’re going to feel like you’ve reduced your risk, but in fact, you’ve increased it on the other end through shortfall risk. Everything is a balance When it comes to investing, you can’t have it all. You think you’re safe by doing X, but what you don’t know is that there’s a balance. So while you’re safe, you’re also causing something else to go out of whack. Actionable

18 MIN1 w ago
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Robert Seawright – Avoid Overconfidence Bias by Remembering That Randomness Is Everywhere

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Dan Gramza, David Keller & Dustin Mathews

Current times might be difficult, and the future may seem bleak, but we will make it through. We will survive and thrive. Our past guests share more advice to help us navigate the COVID-19 crisis. Dan Gramza from Ep43 Don’t Let Overconfidence Ruin Your Trading Strategy Dan Gramza is the President of Gramza Capital Management, Inc. He is a trader, consultant to domestic and international clients, an advisor to hedge funds, a developer of ETF/ETC securities, and co-inventor of two issued security patents. He has published works and has appeared on numerous media outlets around the world. We cannot control the social and economic impact of the virus, but we do have total control over how we react to these changes. Your focus should be on your reaction to thrive. Appreciate the restrictions that have come with this virus because they are causing hidden positive changes. This global pandemic has created a common cause that has brought people together locally and globally. This is an opp...

13 MIN2 w ago
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Dan Gramza, David Keller & Dustin Mathews

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Philipp Kristian Diekhöner, Dante Vitoria & Vikas Gupta

Our past podcast guests continue to share with us little pieces of advice that we can all try to maintain and do daily to keep ourselves on an even keel. Hopefully, with this wisdom, we’ll ultimately create a brighter future out of this situation. Philipp Kristian Diekhöner from Ep61 The Impact of Foreign Currency on a Managed Fund Philipp Kristian Diekhöner is a keynote TEDx speaker, global innovation strategist, and author of The Trust Economy, published in English (2017), German (2018), and Simplified Chinese (2019). Philipp has spoken at prominent global organizations such as Facebook, P&G, Microsoft, Turner, Munich Re, Zillow, Globe Telecom, CPA Australia, Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economics and Energy, the Economist Intelligence Unit and many others. We need to understand how we can make agility sustainable. We’re currently experiencing an exciting surge in agility in business. Organizations that are not usually very agile are developing quality responses and solutio...

14 MIN2 w ago
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Philipp Kristian Diekhöner, Dante Vitoria & Vikas Gupta

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Sal Daher, Joe Saul-Sehy & Jack Thomas

Here a few tips from some of our past podcast guests that will help you get through this COVID-19 crisis. These uplifting words of wisdom will help give you a positive mindset and come out of this pandemic stronger. Sal Daher from Ep152 To Win Big as an Angel Investor, You Have to Look at All Angles Sal Daher is an angel investor who invests in technologies that set Boston apart. He is a member of Walnut Ventures and MIT Angels. Sal is a syndicate lead and podcast host at Angel Invest Boston Podcast. Be very careful with your cash, renegotiate your rents, and consider the cost of your headcount. This thing is going to be here for a while; we’re not going to have vibrant economic activity anytime soon. So you have to think long term in terms of preserving your resources. Use the limited resources that you have, in a way that’s economical for you. This will help others and also help your long term survival. Think creatively; you might be able to build value in your enterprise. But r...

11 MIN3 w ago
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Sal Daher, Joe Saul-Sehy & Jack Thomas

Scott Beebe – Write It Down to Gain Clarity and Business Results

Scott Beebe is the founder and head coach of MyBusinessOnPurpose.com and author of Let Your Business Burn: Stop Putting Out Fires, Discover Purpose, And Build A Business That Matters. Scott hosts the Business On Purpose podcast sharing real stories of how he and the team are working with business owners and their key leaders. They’re building systems, process, and purpose using the Business On Purpose Roadmap to liberate businesses from the chaos of working in their business and help them get their lives back. “Where there is no vision, people become detached, people then scatter, and eventually people die.” Scott Beebe Worst investment ever Success as he knew it comes tumbling down in an instant One snowy Friday morning in February 2015, Scott walked into work and walked back home unemployed. He went home, ready to count his losses and figure out how to bounce back. Married with three kids, Scott needed to find his footing again and fast. Taking his side hustle more seriously At...

30 MIN3 w ago
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Scott Beebe – Write It Down to Gain Clarity and Business Results

Daniel Gomez – Forgiveness Is Your Key to Success in Life and Business

Daniel Gomez is an Award-Winning Business Strategist, Corporate Trainer, and Confidence Architect and is the President/Founder of Daniel Gomez Enterprises. Daniel speaks and coaches at events all over the world! His passion is to elevate businesses and entrepreneurs to achieve their true potential through their training and coaching programs. Daniel has empowered his clients to build epic success in their personal and professional lives. He is the international best-selling author of “You Were Born to Fly,” a book written to inspire and give people the high-performance habits and confidence needed to be the leaders of their destiny. “The quality of your life is determined by the quality of the questions you ask yourself.” Daniel Gomez Worst investment ever When anger impedes your success in life Daniel had been living with a lot of anger. This anger saw him sabotage himself and his business. He was full of hate and would barely bring himself to trust anyone, including his client...

19 MINMAY 4
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Daniel Gomez – Forgiveness Is Your Key to Success in Life and Business

Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Giacomo Arcaro, Johnny FD & Nicolas Rabener

Three more of our past podcast guests graciously shared some words of advice to help us cope and make the most out of the COVID-19 epidemic. Giacomo Arcaro from Ep113 Don’t Chase the Money Giacomo Arcaro is one of the most important European growth hackers, with more than 140,000 “crypto-followers” and has been featured in the Financial Times, Forbes, Wired, and the Los Angeles Times. He’s had 2-million-euro exits with two start-ups, CercaClienti.it and SocialAutomation.online, and is the founder of Black Marketing Guru. We need to understand that during the COVID-19 crisis, we are going to face a low touch economy where you have to consider a lot of factors. If you have a business based in a small area with a lot of people, you need to reconsider reinventing your business so that it remains standing if this crisis goes for a year or two. One way of reinventing your business, for example, is running it on social media platforms such as Instagram or Facebook Live. COVID-19 has no...

14 MINAPR 30
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Inspiration in Times of Crisis from Giacomo Arcaro, Johnny FD & Nicolas Rabener
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