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Level Up Learning

Hampton City Schools

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Level Up Learning

Level Up Learning

Hampton City Schools

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About Us

The Level Up Learning Podcast is designed for K-12 educators and aims to explain, dispel, or clear up misconceptions about current topics in education.

Latest Episodes

The Cure for the Common PD: How to Hold an EdCamp

Want to hold a PD that’s entirely participant-driven, relevant, and potentially life-changing? Kate and Dave explore the EdCamp model, including the basics of how to hold an EdCamp, tips and strategies, and provide you with resources for holding your first EdCamp. EdCamp Hampton Roads website: bit.ly/EdCampHREdCamp foundation: http://www.edcamp.org/

19 min2016 MAR 23
Comments
The Cure for the Common PD: How to Hold an EdCamp

Get Smart With More Art!

Kate and Dave talk to Kelly Dee, music teacher specialist, about ways that every teacher can incorporate more arts into their classroom, both to help motivate students and increase student achievement. Baker, M. (2007). “Music moves brain to pay attention, Stanford study finds.” Stanford Medicine: News Center. Retrieved from https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2007/07/music-moves-brain-to-pay-attention-stanford-study-finds.html Marzano, R.J. (2007). The Art and science of teaching. Alexandra, VA: ASCD. Music:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KK23BhEQVyU

12 min2016 MAR 16
Comments
Get Smart With More Art!

No Child Left Behind vs. Every Student Succeeds Act: What do we need to know?

Whether you loved or hated NCLB, certain changes are coming as we move into teaching and learning under the Every Students Succeeds Act. Kate and Dave summarize the two acts and outline what’s different, and what’s going to stay the same. A must-listen for all educators and parents. Korte, G. (2015). “The Every Student Succeeds Act vs. No Child Left Behind: What’s changed?” USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2015/12/10/every-student-succeeds-act-vs-no-child-left-behind-whats-changed/77088780/ “Every Student Succeeds Act: Comparison of the No Child Left Behind Act to the Every Student Succeeds Act.” (2015). ASCD. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/siteASCD/policy/ESEA_ComparisonChart_FINAL.pdf

11 min2016 MAR 12
Comments
No Child Left Behind vs. Every Student Succeeds Act: What do we need to know?

Do you have to be bitten by radioactive curriculum to have Power Standards?

There is a finite amount of time we have with students, and yet an ever-increasing expanse of curriculum. Dave and Kate look at how we can use the idea of Power Standards to determine which standards get the majority of our emphasis using the work of several prominent curriculum theorists: Doug Reeves, Larry Ainsworth, Fenwick English, Grant Wiggins, and Jay McTighe. Ainsworth, L. (2003). Power standards: Identifying the standards that matter the most. Engelwood, CO: Lead + Learn Press. Ainsworth, L. (2010). Rigorous curriculum design: How to create curricular units of study that align standards, instruction, and assessment. Englewood, Colorado: Lead + Learn Press. English, F.W. (2010). Deciding what to teach and what to test: Developing, aligning, and leading the curriculum. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin. Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

12 min2016 MAR 4
Comments
Do you have to be bitten by radioactive curriculum to have Power Standards?

Is it time to ditch the classroom desk?

Sitting all day isn’t good for anyone--and it can have serious impacts for our students. Dave and Kate explore the consequences of too much sitting for young people, and how more people are turning to standing desks or stability balls--but are these things actually correlated with greater student achievement? Research: Armstrong, T. (2012). “New evidence that standing is better than sitting in classroom.” Peninsula Press. Retrieved from http://institute4learning.com/blog/2012/09/21/new-evidence-that-standing-is-better-than-sitting-in-the-classroom/ Davis, E. (2015). “Want kids to pay attention in class? Give them standing desks.” VITAL RECORD: News from Texas A&M Health Science Center. Retrieved from https://vitalrecord.tamhsc.edu/want-kids-to-pay-attention-in-class-give-them-standing-desks/ Fedewa, A.L., & Erwin, H.E. (2011). “Stability balls and students with attention and hyperactivity concerns: Implications for on-task and in-seat behavior.” The American Journal of Occupa...

12 min2016 FEB 17
Comments
Is it time to ditch the classroom desk?

What’s formative assessment for, anyway?

Join us as Kate and Dave explore what makes formative assessment a powerful strategy, how we involve students in their own formative assessment, and how to use formative assessment to actually drive instruction. Dr. Caggiano, co-authorof the book Formative Assessment Leadership, joins us to tackle this topic. Research: Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement. New York: Routledge. Sanzo, K.L., Myran, S., & Caggiano, J. (2015). Formative assessment leadership. New York: Routledge. Music Credit:Nicolai Heidlas Musichttps://soundcloud.com/nicolai-heidlaswww.facebook.com/pages/Nicolai-He…/524209294358693

14 min2016 FEB 10
Comments
What’s formative assessment for, anyway?

The Best Test: How do we define a “good” assessment?

We worry about our students failing their assessments--but are our assessments failing our students? Kate and Dave discuss the importance of valid and reliable formative and summative assessments with Dr. Cynthia Cooper, Executive Director of Research, Planning, and Evaluation--who points out why we need better tests in education. Research: Gareis, C.R. & Grant, L.W. (2008). Teacher-made assessments: How to connect curriculum, instruction, and student learning. Larchmont, NY: Eye on Education.

13 min2016 JAN 13
Comments
The Best Test: How do we define a “good” assessment?

PD That Works: Guskey’s 5 Levels of PD Evaluation

There are so many factors to professional development...how do we know if it’s been successful? Happy participants? More knowledgeable participants? How about the effect the PD actually has on students? In this podcast, Kate and Dave look at Guskey’s five critical levels of professional development evaluation. Guskey, T.R. (2000). Evaluating professional development. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press, Inc.

12 min2015 DEC 17
Comments
PD That Works: Guskey’s 5 Levels of PD Evaluation

PD that WORKS, Part I: Principles of Andragogy

Tired of professional development that doesn’t seem to make a difference in instruction? Join Kate and Dave as they discuss how the principles of andragogy, or adult-learning, can be used to create PD that actually makes changes for our schools and students. Research: “The mirage: Confronting the hard truth about our quest for teacher development” (2015). Retrieved from http://tntp.org/assets/documents/TNTP_Mirage_Executive_Summary_2015.pdf Sinek, S. (2009). “How great leaders inspire action.” TEDxPuget Sound. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action?language=enPappas, C. (2013). “The adult learning theory--andragogy.” eLearning Industry. Retrieved from http://elearningindustry.com/the-adult-learning-theory-andragogy-of-malcolm-knowles.

11 min2015 DEC 9
Comments
PD that WORKS, Part I: Principles of Andragogy

Save the Bacon! Teach More Math!

If you’re on social media at all, then you probably saw news summaries claiming that a recent World Health Organization reports says bacon and red meat cause cancer. Kate and Dave use number sense to look at the validity of this claim, as well as discuss the concrete-representational-abstract model of mathematics pedagogy that can lead to greater mathematical understandings for our students. Research: Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). “Colorectal cancer risk by age.” Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/statistics/age.htm “Bruner’s stages of representation” (2015). Retrieved from http://bruners-stages.wikispaces.com/Bruner%27s+Stages+of+Representation

12 min2015 DEC 2
Comments
Save the Bacon! Teach More Math!

Latest Episodes

The Cure for the Common PD: How to Hold an EdCamp

Want to hold a PD that’s entirely participant-driven, relevant, and potentially life-changing? Kate and Dave explore the EdCamp model, including the basics of how to hold an EdCamp, tips and strategies, and provide you with resources for holding your first EdCamp. EdCamp Hampton Roads website: bit.ly/EdCampHREdCamp foundation: http://www.edcamp.org/

19 min2016 MAR 23
Comments
The Cure for the Common PD: How to Hold an EdCamp

Get Smart With More Art!

Kate and Dave talk to Kelly Dee, music teacher specialist, about ways that every teacher can incorporate more arts into their classroom, both to help motivate students and increase student achievement. Baker, M. (2007). “Music moves brain to pay attention, Stanford study finds.” Stanford Medicine: News Center. Retrieved from https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2007/07/music-moves-brain-to-pay-attention-stanford-study-finds.html Marzano, R.J. (2007). The Art and science of teaching. Alexandra, VA: ASCD. Music:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KK23BhEQVyU

12 min2016 MAR 16
Comments
Get Smart With More Art!

No Child Left Behind vs. Every Student Succeeds Act: What do we need to know?

Whether you loved or hated NCLB, certain changes are coming as we move into teaching and learning under the Every Students Succeeds Act. Kate and Dave summarize the two acts and outline what’s different, and what’s going to stay the same. A must-listen for all educators and parents. Korte, G. (2015). “The Every Student Succeeds Act vs. No Child Left Behind: What’s changed?” USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2015/12/10/every-student-succeeds-act-vs-no-child-left-behind-whats-changed/77088780/ “Every Student Succeeds Act: Comparison of the No Child Left Behind Act to the Every Student Succeeds Act.” (2015). ASCD. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/siteASCD/policy/ESEA_ComparisonChart_FINAL.pdf

11 min2016 MAR 12
Comments
No Child Left Behind vs. Every Student Succeeds Act: What do we need to know?

Do you have to be bitten by radioactive curriculum to have Power Standards?

There is a finite amount of time we have with students, and yet an ever-increasing expanse of curriculum. Dave and Kate look at how we can use the idea of Power Standards to determine which standards get the majority of our emphasis using the work of several prominent curriculum theorists: Doug Reeves, Larry Ainsworth, Fenwick English, Grant Wiggins, and Jay McTighe. Ainsworth, L. (2003). Power standards: Identifying the standards that matter the most. Engelwood, CO: Lead + Learn Press. Ainsworth, L. (2010). Rigorous curriculum design: How to create curricular units of study that align standards, instruction, and assessment. Englewood, Colorado: Lead + Learn Press. English, F.W. (2010). Deciding what to teach and what to test: Developing, aligning, and leading the curriculum. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin. Wiggins, G. & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

12 min2016 MAR 4
Comments
Do you have to be bitten by radioactive curriculum to have Power Standards?

Is it time to ditch the classroom desk?

Sitting all day isn’t good for anyone--and it can have serious impacts for our students. Dave and Kate explore the consequences of too much sitting for young people, and how more people are turning to standing desks or stability balls--but are these things actually correlated with greater student achievement? Research: Armstrong, T. (2012). “New evidence that standing is better than sitting in classroom.” Peninsula Press. Retrieved from http://institute4learning.com/blog/2012/09/21/new-evidence-that-standing-is-better-than-sitting-in-the-classroom/ Davis, E. (2015). “Want kids to pay attention in class? Give them standing desks.” VITAL RECORD: News from Texas A&M Health Science Center. Retrieved from https://vitalrecord.tamhsc.edu/want-kids-to-pay-attention-in-class-give-them-standing-desks/ Fedewa, A.L., & Erwin, H.E. (2011). “Stability balls and students with attention and hyperactivity concerns: Implications for on-task and in-seat behavior.” The American Journal of Occupa...

12 min2016 FEB 17
Comments
Is it time to ditch the classroom desk?

What’s formative assessment for, anyway?

Join us as Kate and Dave explore what makes formative assessment a powerful strategy, how we involve students in their own formative assessment, and how to use formative assessment to actually drive instruction. Dr. Caggiano, co-authorof the book Formative Assessment Leadership, joins us to tackle this topic. Research: Hattie, J. (2009). Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement. New York: Routledge. Sanzo, K.L., Myran, S., & Caggiano, J. (2015). Formative assessment leadership. New York: Routledge. Music Credit:Nicolai Heidlas Musichttps://soundcloud.com/nicolai-heidlaswww.facebook.com/pages/Nicolai-He…/524209294358693

14 min2016 FEB 10
Comments
What’s formative assessment for, anyway?

The Best Test: How do we define a “good” assessment?

We worry about our students failing their assessments--but are our assessments failing our students? Kate and Dave discuss the importance of valid and reliable formative and summative assessments with Dr. Cynthia Cooper, Executive Director of Research, Planning, and Evaluation--who points out why we need better tests in education. Research: Gareis, C.R. & Grant, L.W. (2008). Teacher-made assessments: How to connect curriculum, instruction, and student learning. Larchmont, NY: Eye on Education.

13 min2016 JAN 13
Comments
The Best Test: How do we define a “good” assessment?

PD That Works: Guskey’s 5 Levels of PD Evaluation

There are so many factors to professional development...how do we know if it’s been successful? Happy participants? More knowledgeable participants? How about the effect the PD actually has on students? In this podcast, Kate and Dave look at Guskey’s five critical levels of professional development evaluation. Guskey, T.R. (2000). Evaluating professional development. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press, Inc.

12 min2015 DEC 17
Comments
PD That Works: Guskey’s 5 Levels of PD Evaluation

PD that WORKS, Part I: Principles of Andragogy

Tired of professional development that doesn’t seem to make a difference in instruction? Join Kate and Dave as they discuss how the principles of andragogy, or adult-learning, can be used to create PD that actually makes changes for our schools and students. Research: “The mirage: Confronting the hard truth about our quest for teacher development” (2015). Retrieved from http://tntp.org/assets/documents/TNTP_Mirage_Executive_Summary_2015.pdf Sinek, S. (2009). “How great leaders inspire action.” TEDxPuget Sound. Retrieved from https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action?language=enPappas, C. (2013). “The adult learning theory--andragogy.” eLearning Industry. Retrieved from http://elearningindustry.com/the-adult-learning-theory-andragogy-of-malcolm-knowles.

11 min2015 DEC 9
Comments
PD that WORKS, Part I: Principles of Andragogy

Save the Bacon! Teach More Math!

If you’re on social media at all, then you probably saw news summaries claiming that a recent World Health Organization reports says bacon and red meat cause cancer. Kate and Dave use number sense to look at the validity of this claim, as well as discuss the concrete-representational-abstract model of mathematics pedagogy that can lead to greater mathematical understandings for our students. Research: Center for Disease Control and Prevention (2014). “Colorectal cancer risk by age.” Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/statistics/age.htm “Bruner’s stages of representation” (2015). Retrieved from http://bruners-stages.wikispaces.com/Bruner%27s+Stages+of+Representation

12 min2015 DEC 2
Comments
Save the Bacon! Teach More Math!
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