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Tiny Leaps, Big Changes

Gregg Clunis

145
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1.0K
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Tiny Leaps, Big Changes

Tiny Leaps, Big Changes

Gregg Clunis

145
Followers
1.0K
Plays
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About Us

Tiny Leaps, Big Changes is a personal development podcast focused on exploring the day-to-day behaviors we all engage in that determine the results we gain in our lives. Hosted by Gregg Clunis, the show shares simple strategies you can implement into your life to start moving the needle towards your biggest goals.

Latest Episodes

554 - Mental Health Emergencies

In this episode, look at mental health emergencies. Recognizingan Emergency: Any time a person is an immediate danger to others or themselves, experts say. Quote: "In many ways, issues related to suicide are similar to having chest pain: This is an emergency, and it should be taken seriously," Borenstein says. In other words, if someone around you is threatening violence,call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room yourself, he says. Other situations that warrant quick care include people who show signs of psychosis that affect their functioning such as delusions, paranoia or fear, Borenstein says. People who are extremely agitated, wild, overly active and unable to calm down should also raise red flags – particularly if they don't respond to verbal interventions like saying, "Hey, can we sit down and talk?" Lieberman adds. Sudden behavior changes should be taken seriously, too. "If something evolves rapidly, it's probably not psychiatric," Lieberman says.It's probably something really, really serious like poisoning, and they just need to be taken to the closest emergency room immediately."If you have a choice, head to an academic medical center, since clinicians there tend to be up-to-date on the most effective procedures and treatments, he says." When to Ask For Help if its Not an Emergency: Feeling sad, angry, or otherwise “not yourself.” Abusing drugs,alcohol, food, orsexto cope. You’ve lost someone or something important to you. Somethingtraumatichas happened. You can’t do the things you like to do. Resources: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/where-science-meets-the-steps/201303/5-signs-its-time-seek-therapy https://www.mhanational.org/finding-help-when-get-it-and-where-go https://health.usnews.com/health-news/best-hospitals/articles/2015/07/21/what-to-do-during-a-mental-health-crisis --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

17 MIN23 h ago
Comments
554 - Mental Health Emergencies

553 - The Problem With Personal Development

In this episode, we take an honest look at the personal development industry and some of it's biggest issues. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

17 MIN3 d ago
Comments
553 - The Problem With Personal Development

552 - How to Combat Decision Fatigue

In this episode, we talk about decision fatigue. Try Bllinkist: http://blinkist.com/tinyleaps What is Decision Fatigue? "As it turns out, your willpower is like a muscle. And similar to the muscles in your body, willpower can get fatigued when you use it over and over again. Every time you make a decision, it’s like doing another rep in the gym. And similar to how your muscles get tired at the end of a workout, the strength of your willpower fades as you make more decisions." - James Clear Everyone has a reserve of mental energy, and each decision draws on it The more decisions you make, the less mental energy you have Two Ways to Avoid It: Proactive: Optimizing your day to day routine to reduce unnecessary decisions (the president) Choose your outfit the night before Set out clothes for workouts Meal prep Reactive: Giving yourself space to reset and improve decision making (taking a break) Do something fun Take a break Stop for the day Key Takeaways: 1. Plan to make decisions early in the day 2. Make small decisions (like what to wear)ahead of time 3. Avoid impulse decisions Resources: https://jamesclear.com/willpower-decision-fatigue https://www.forbes.com/sites/womensmedia/2019/05/13/how-to-identify-when-youre-experiencing-decision-fatigue/#1dfea0267fb4 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

15 MIN5 d ago
Comments
552 - How to Combat Decision Fatigue

551 - How Habit Stacking Works

In this episode, we take a look at habit stacking and why it works. Join Thrive Market: http://thrivemarket.com/tinyleaps What is Habit Stacking? "Also termed 'habit chaining', the process involves grouping together small activities into a routine which you link to a habit already set in your day. This makes the routine memorable and anchors your new habits to an existing trigger. Or in simpler terms: use the things you already remember to do to remind you to do something else, like reading one chapter of a book when you get into bed." Why Does This Work? Classical Conditioning What is Classical Conditioning? "Classical conditioning involves placing a neutral signal before a naturally occurring reflex. In Pavlov's classic experiment with dogs, the neutral signal was the sound of a tone and the naturally occurring reflex was salivating in response to food. By associating the neutral stimulus with the environmental stimulus (food), the sound of the tone alone could produce the salivation response." The 5 Stages: Acquisition Extinction Spontaneous Recovery Key Takeaways: Habit Stacking is the process of pairing a new habit with an existing one This works because of classical conditioning which ties new behaviors to existing behaviors When trying to build new habits you'll gothrough periods of acquisition, extinction, and spontaneous recovery Resources: https://www.verywellmind.com/classical-conditioning-2794859 https://www.esquire.com/uk/life/fitness-wellbeing/a15489/habit-stacking-chaining/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

14 MIN6 d ago
Comments
551 - How Habit Stacking Works

550 - How to Change Yourself

In this episode, we talk about how to change yourself. Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/tinyleaps What is Reciprocal Determinism: "According to psychologistAlbert Bandura, reciprocal determinism is a model composed of three factors that influencebehavior: the environment, the individual, and the behavior itself. According to this theory, an individual's behavior influences and is influenced by both the social world and personal characteristics." Behavior "behavior is controlled or determined by the individual, through cognitive processes, and by the environment, through external social stimulus events." Environment "the physical surroundings around the individual that contain potentially reinforcing stimuli, including people who are present (or absent)." Individual "all the characteristics that have been rewarded in the past. Personality and cognitive factors play an important part in how a person behaves, including all of the individual's expectations, beliefs, andunique p...

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
550 - How to Change Yourself

549 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 2. (feat Alina Tugend)

In this episode, I sit down with Alina Tugend to discuss her book Better By Mistake. About the Guest: Alina Tugend is a long-time journalist who has worked in Southern California, London, Washington DC, Rhode Island and New York. From 2005-2015 she wrote the award-winning biweekly Shortcuts column for The New York Times business section; Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The Times, The Atlantic, O, the Oprah Magazine, Family Circle and Inc. Magazine. In 2011, Riverhead published Tugend’s first book, “Better by Mistake: The Unexpected Benefits of Being Wrong.” She also contributed a chapter to the book “Mistakes I Made at Work: 25 Influential Women Reflect on What They Got Out of Getting it Wrong.” Follow her on twitter at @atugend and see more of her work at www.alinatugend.com Her Work: On giving and receiving feedback https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/your-money/how-to-survive-performance-reviews.html Why we remember negative events more than positive...

25 MIN1 w ago
Comments
549 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 2. (feat Alina Tugend)

548 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 1. (feat Alina Tugend)

In this episode, I sit down with Alina Tugend to discuss her book Better By Mistake. About the Guest: Alina Tugend is a long-time journalist who has worked in Southern California, London, Washington DC, Rhode Island and New York. From 2005-2015 she wrote the award-winning biweekly Shortcuts column for The New York Times business section; Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The Times, The Atlantic, O, the Oprah Magazine, Family Circle and Inc. Magazine. In 2011, Riverhead published Tugend’s first book, “Better by Mistake: The Unexpected Benefits of Being Wrong.” She also contributed a chapter to the book “Mistakes I Made at Work: 25 Influential Women Reflect on What They Got Out of Getting it Wrong.” Follow her on twitter at @atugend and see more of her work at www.alinatugend.com Her Work: On giving and receiving feedback https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/your-money/how-to-survive-performance-reviews.html Why we remember negative events more than positive...

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
548 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 1. (feat Alina Tugend)

547 - How Reward Systems Work

In this episode, we talk about reward systems and why they work so dang well. Try Blinkist: http://blinkist.com/tinyleaps Common Reasons to Use Reward Systems Rewards success Punishes failure Something to look forward to What is Operant Conditioning "Operant conditioning(sometimes referred to asinstrumental conditioning) is a method of learning that occurs through rewards and punishments for behavior. Through operant conditioning, an association is made between a behavior and a consequence for that behavior" Why Does This Work? There are two types of behavior Respondent behaviorsare those that occur automatically and reflexively. Think of pulling your hand away from the stove when burned or putting your hands forward to stop yourself when falling. Operant behaviors, on the other hand, are those under ourconsciouscontrol. Some may occur spontaneously and others purposely, but it is the consequences of these actions that then influence whether or not they occur again in the future. Ke...

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
547 - How Reward Systems Work

546 - How a Plant-Based Diet Helped His Diabetes (feat. Eric Adams)

In this episode, I sit down with Eric Adams to talk about meditation, mindfulness, and how switching to a plant-based diet cured his diabetes. Try Better Help: www.betterhelp.com/tinyleaps --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

23 MIN3 w ago
Comments
546 - How a Plant-Based Diet Helped His Diabetes (feat. Eric Adams)

545 - Police Reform, Protesting, and Creating Real Change (feat. Eric Adams)

In this episode, I sit down with the current Brooklyn Borough President to discuss George Floyd, Police Reform, Protesting, and how to create real lasting change in the system. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

22 MINJUN 4
Comments
545 - Police Reform, Protesting, and Creating Real Change (feat. Eric Adams)

Latest Episodes

554 - Mental Health Emergencies

In this episode, look at mental health emergencies. Recognizingan Emergency: Any time a person is an immediate danger to others or themselves, experts say. Quote: "In many ways, issues related to suicide are similar to having chest pain: This is an emergency, and it should be taken seriously," Borenstein says. In other words, if someone around you is threatening violence,call 911 or take the person to the nearest emergency room yourself, he says. Other situations that warrant quick care include people who show signs of psychosis that affect their functioning such as delusions, paranoia or fear, Borenstein says. People who are extremely agitated, wild, overly active and unable to calm down should also raise red flags – particularly if they don't respond to verbal interventions like saying, "Hey, can we sit down and talk?" Lieberman adds. Sudden behavior changes should be taken seriously, too. "If something evolves rapidly, it's probably not psychiatric," Lieberman says.It's probably something really, really serious like poisoning, and they just need to be taken to the closest emergency room immediately."If you have a choice, head to an academic medical center, since clinicians there tend to be up-to-date on the most effective procedures and treatments, he says." When to Ask For Help if its Not an Emergency: Feeling sad, angry, or otherwise “not yourself.” Abusing drugs,alcohol, food, orsexto cope. You’ve lost someone or something important to you. Somethingtraumatichas happened. You can’t do the things you like to do. Resources: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/where-science-meets-the-steps/201303/5-signs-its-time-seek-therapy https://www.mhanational.org/finding-help-when-get-it-and-where-go https://health.usnews.com/health-news/best-hospitals/articles/2015/07/21/what-to-do-during-a-mental-health-crisis --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

17 MIN23 h ago
Comments
554 - Mental Health Emergencies

553 - The Problem With Personal Development

In this episode, we take an honest look at the personal development industry and some of it's biggest issues. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

17 MIN3 d ago
Comments
553 - The Problem With Personal Development

552 - How to Combat Decision Fatigue

In this episode, we talk about decision fatigue. Try Bllinkist: http://blinkist.com/tinyleaps What is Decision Fatigue? "As it turns out, your willpower is like a muscle. And similar to the muscles in your body, willpower can get fatigued when you use it over and over again. Every time you make a decision, it’s like doing another rep in the gym. And similar to how your muscles get tired at the end of a workout, the strength of your willpower fades as you make more decisions." - James Clear Everyone has a reserve of mental energy, and each decision draws on it The more decisions you make, the less mental energy you have Two Ways to Avoid It: Proactive: Optimizing your day to day routine to reduce unnecessary decisions (the president) Choose your outfit the night before Set out clothes for workouts Meal prep Reactive: Giving yourself space to reset and improve decision making (taking a break) Do something fun Take a break Stop for the day Key Takeaways: 1. Plan to make decisions early in the day 2. Make small decisions (like what to wear)ahead of time 3. Avoid impulse decisions Resources: https://jamesclear.com/willpower-decision-fatigue https://www.forbes.com/sites/womensmedia/2019/05/13/how-to-identify-when-youre-experiencing-decision-fatigue/#1dfea0267fb4 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

15 MIN5 d ago
Comments
552 - How to Combat Decision Fatigue

551 - How Habit Stacking Works

In this episode, we take a look at habit stacking and why it works. Join Thrive Market: http://thrivemarket.com/tinyleaps What is Habit Stacking? "Also termed 'habit chaining', the process involves grouping together small activities into a routine which you link to a habit already set in your day. This makes the routine memorable and anchors your new habits to an existing trigger. Or in simpler terms: use the things you already remember to do to remind you to do something else, like reading one chapter of a book when you get into bed." Why Does This Work? Classical Conditioning What is Classical Conditioning? "Classical conditioning involves placing a neutral signal before a naturally occurring reflex. In Pavlov's classic experiment with dogs, the neutral signal was the sound of a tone and the naturally occurring reflex was salivating in response to food. By associating the neutral stimulus with the environmental stimulus (food), the sound of the tone alone could produce the salivation response." The 5 Stages: Acquisition Extinction Spontaneous Recovery Key Takeaways: Habit Stacking is the process of pairing a new habit with an existing one This works because of classical conditioning which ties new behaviors to existing behaviors When trying to build new habits you'll gothrough periods of acquisition, extinction, and spontaneous recovery Resources: https://www.verywellmind.com/classical-conditioning-2794859 https://www.esquire.com/uk/life/fitness-wellbeing/a15489/habit-stacking-chaining/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

14 MIN6 d ago
Comments
551 - How Habit Stacking Works

550 - How to Change Yourself

In this episode, we talk about how to change yourself. Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/tinyleaps What is Reciprocal Determinism: "According to psychologistAlbert Bandura, reciprocal determinism is a model composed of three factors that influencebehavior: the environment, the individual, and the behavior itself. According to this theory, an individual's behavior influences and is influenced by both the social world and personal characteristics." Behavior "behavior is controlled or determined by the individual, through cognitive processes, and by the environment, through external social stimulus events." Environment "the physical surroundings around the individual that contain potentially reinforcing stimuli, including people who are present (or absent)." Individual "all the characteristics that have been rewarded in the past. Personality and cognitive factors play an important part in how a person behaves, including all of the individual's expectations, beliefs, andunique p...

15 MIN1 w ago
Comments
550 - How to Change Yourself

549 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 2. (feat Alina Tugend)

In this episode, I sit down with Alina Tugend to discuss her book Better By Mistake. About the Guest: Alina Tugend is a long-time journalist who has worked in Southern California, London, Washington DC, Rhode Island and New York. From 2005-2015 she wrote the award-winning biweekly Shortcuts column for The New York Times business section; Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The Times, The Atlantic, O, the Oprah Magazine, Family Circle and Inc. Magazine. In 2011, Riverhead published Tugend’s first book, “Better by Mistake: The Unexpected Benefits of Being Wrong.” She also contributed a chapter to the book “Mistakes I Made at Work: 25 Influential Women Reflect on What They Got Out of Getting it Wrong.” Follow her on twitter at @atugend and see more of her work at www.alinatugend.com Her Work: On giving and receiving feedback https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/your-money/how-to-survive-performance-reviews.html Why we remember negative events more than positive...

25 MIN1 w ago
Comments
549 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 2. (feat Alina Tugend)

548 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 1. (feat Alina Tugend)

In this episode, I sit down with Alina Tugend to discuss her book Better By Mistake. About the Guest: Alina Tugend is a long-time journalist who has worked in Southern California, London, Washington DC, Rhode Island and New York. From 2005-2015 she wrote the award-winning biweekly Shortcuts column for The New York Times business section; Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including The Times, The Atlantic, O, the Oprah Magazine, Family Circle and Inc. Magazine. In 2011, Riverhead published Tugend’s first book, “Better by Mistake: The Unexpected Benefits of Being Wrong.” She also contributed a chapter to the book “Mistakes I Made at Work: 25 Influential Women Reflect on What They Got Out of Getting it Wrong.” Follow her on twitter at @atugend and see more of her work at www.alinatugend.com Her Work: On giving and receiving feedback https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/your-money/how-to-survive-performance-reviews.html Why we remember negative events more than positive...

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
548 - How to Be Better By Mistake Pt 1. (feat Alina Tugend)

547 - How Reward Systems Work

In this episode, we talk about reward systems and why they work so dang well. Try Blinkist: http://blinkist.com/tinyleaps Common Reasons to Use Reward Systems Rewards success Punishes failure Something to look forward to What is Operant Conditioning "Operant conditioning(sometimes referred to asinstrumental conditioning) is a method of learning that occurs through rewards and punishments for behavior. Through operant conditioning, an association is made between a behavior and a consequence for that behavior" Why Does This Work? There are two types of behavior Respondent behaviorsare those that occur automatically and reflexively. Think of pulling your hand away from the stove when burned or putting your hands forward to stop yourself when falling. Operant behaviors, on the other hand, are those under ourconsciouscontrol. Some may occur spontaneously and others purposely, but it is the consequences of these actions that then influence whether or not they occur again in the future. Ke...

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
547 - How Reward Systems Work

546 - How a Plant-Based Diet Helped His Diabetes (feat. Eric Adams)

In this episode, I sit down with Eric Adams to talk about meditation, mindfulness, and how switching to a plant-based diet cured his diabetes. Try Better Help: www.betterhelp.com/tinyleaps --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

23 MIN3 w ago
Comments
546 - How a Plant-Based Diet Helped His Diabetes (feat. Eric Adams)

545 - Police Reform, Protesting, and Creating Real Change (feat. Eric Adams)

In this episode, I sit down with the current Brooklyn Borough President to discuss George Floyd, Police Reform, Protesting, and how to create real lasting change in the system. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

22 MINJUN 4
Comments
545 - Police Reform, Protesting, and Creating Real Change (feat. Eric Adams)

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