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Tenny's Tunes

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Tenny's Tunes

Tenny's Tunes

North by Northwestern

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Tenny presents you with his own renditions of soundtracks and more on the piano. Tune in for a meditative experience with music!

Latest Episodes

Tenny’s Tunes #15: Can Piano Sound Like Guitars

Episode Notes [“clavar la espada” by Shiro Sagisu] Hi guys, it’s Tenny. Welcome to episode 15 of Tenny’s Tunes. Hope everyone’s doing okay as we head into the final three months of 2020. I hope the worst times have passed, but yet I wonder if what is to come will be any better. I guess that sums up life in general. I have a question for you. Do you think pianos can sound like other instruments? We often hear people commenting on how flutes can sound like birds chirping, or clarinets at high pitches can resemble kettles with boiling water. But those are comparisons between a strictly defined musical instrument and a non-conventional instrument - because one can certainly make music out of anything in this day and age. With regards to piano, I often find it easy to emulate the sound of a choir from fugues by Bach with the distinct SATB voice lines. Step on the sustain pedal, and you have a Bach piece that sounds like it should be played in the church. More recently, I’ve started to take an interest in guitar, not in the sense that I have one and I am learning how to play it, but that I see similarities between the techniques used in guitar and piano performances. Specifically, the Spanish guitar, which is known for some of the most advanced techniques. As an example, the Spanish guitar often features picado, which is an alternate picking between the index and middle fingers as you hold your thumb onto the E string. This results in a fast-paced rhythmic repetition that goes either up or down the scale and, quite frankly, serves as the soul of a flamenco performance. Of course, there are also claps and singing that accompany a flamenco dancer, but if you only want to go with the essentials, a guitar is what matters the most from my experience. But don’t quote me on that. In this sense, piano and guitar are quite similar. Your fingers can move pretty fast up and down the keyboard, or repeat in a cycle of three notes to mimic that picado sound. There are limitations to how much a piano can try to reproduce a guitar piece, of course. For instance, traditional pianos can’t really do vibratos like guitars or violins, but I believe electric pianos can through certain functions. With that in mind, I bring to you today an attempt at interpreting a guitar/violin piece with piano. The piece is called “La Distancia Para Un Duelo” and has a Spanish feel to it. Hope you like it. You can also look up the original version on YouTube as well. I am Tenny, and this is NBN Audio. Peace. [“La distancia para un duelo” by Shiro Sagisu, performed by Tenny Tsang] This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

6 min2 w ago
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Tenny’s Tunes #15: Can Piano Sound Like Guitars

Tenny’s Tunes #14: 千本桜 (Senbonzakura)

Episode Notes [“千本桜 (Senbonzakura)”] Hi guys, welcome to Episode 14 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host, Tenny. Hope everyone is safe and healthy. This was arguably the most popular Japanese song in 2014 (by Wagakki Band, a Japanese rock band that uses traditional instruments). I was still in middle school back then, and my range of preference for music was a bit narrow. The melody didn’t appeal to me for some reason, but at least it was pleasing to the ear. One thing I didn’t get was why people were so crazy over the tempo or speed of the song, creating their own versions and remixes that were even faster than the original piece. To me, showing off skills for the sake of it didn’t do the music justice at all. Nevertheless, I decided to revisit this piece in honor of that era. If you wanna see me playing it, here is the link to the video. Hope you enjoy. This is NBN Audio. [“千本桜 (Senbonzakura)”] Music performed by Tenny Tsang. This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

4 minMAY 27
Comments
Tenny’s Tunes #14: 千本桜 (Senbonzakura)

Tenny’s Tunes #13: Clair de Lune

Episode Notes Hi guys, welcome to Episode 13 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Hope everyone is safe and healthy.Inspiration: Back in high school, I volunteered at a local senior center and played piano music for the residents there. I would take requests to play certain pieces, but there’s one that I just did not take the time to learn. That’s right, it’s Clair de Lune by Claude Debussy, not the Beethoven Moonlight Sonata that some people might confuse it with. Even my good friends in college tell me, “You know Tenny, you really should know how to play this one.” Well, quarantine time means piano time for me!Creation: It took a lot of tries to nail this one. I played at a slower tempo than usual. It’s actually harder to play classical pieces on my MIDI keyboard than on a regular piano. Message: Haha, I was a bit lazy for the past few ones. We are all different people, but I will tell you what I got from the piece. How do you feel when you look at the moon at night? Do you prefer a crescent, a gibbous, a new moon or a full moon? Maybe a combination? I have no preference. To me, the moon is as fickle and elusive as it can be, but it still abides by the pattern of the moon phases every month. Humans are too. We all have a bottom line that we will never cross over, or else we cease to be humans. Alright, enjoy! This is NBN Audio. [“Clair de Lune” performed by Tenny Tsang]Music performed by Tenny Tsang.This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

7 minMAY 1
Comments
Tenny’s Tunes #13: Clair de Lune

Tenny's Tunes #12: Tchaikovsky Nocturne Op. 19 No. 4 in D minor

Episode Notes Hi guys, welcome to Episode 12 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Hope everyone is safe and healthy. Inspiration: I was very fortunate to be able to perform a cello piano duet of Tchaikovsky’s Nocturne No. 4 with an elderly French gentleman in Aix-en-Provence, France, the summer of 2019. I was studying abroad there for six weeks. Now, I want to return to this piece for memory sake after nearly a year. Creation: I was planning on recording the common piano solo version that’s in C sharp minor, but the key just didn’t sound right to me personally, perhaps because I originally played the duet version in D minor. So I took a U-turn halfway through recording and decided to stick to D minor key. Message: Not going to spoil it. We all have our own unique interpretations of this piece. Enjoy! [“Tchaikovsky Nocturne Op. 19 No. 4 in D minor (piano solo)” performed by Tenny Tsang] _Music performed by Tenny Tsang. _ This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

6 minAPR 16
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #12: Tchaikovsky Nocturne Op. 19 No. 4 in D minor

Tenny's Tunes #11: White Night March

Episode Notes [“White Night March” performed by Tenny Tsang] Hi guys, welcome to Episode 11 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host, Tenny. Today, we are not going the fancy route. Just plain old piano with no other accompaniment. This piece is a movie soundtrack from Journey under the Midnight Sun, which came out around 2011. Original by Hirai Mamiko. Inspiration: Not much. I wanted to play this myself because I love it. Creation: This is an easy piece at first glance. But it does take effort to nail the intonation and articulation of each note and chord. Message: One cannot stare directly at the sun. Nor look directly into what’s in the heart. Original by Hirai Mamiko. Music performed by Tenny Tsang. This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

4 minFEB 18
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #11: White Night March

Tenny's Tunes #10: Stärker

Episode Notes [“Stärker” By Tenny Tsang] Hi guys, welcome to episode ten of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Before we dive in, I want to wish everyone a safe, healthy and successful 2020. For some time, I have been thinking of getting a good MIDI keyboard to make some simple music, and it just so happens that our current NBN editor-in-chief was selling one. So I got it from him and made this instrumental adaptation of “Stronger” using the piano and erhu, a Chinese string instrument. Original by Daft Punk and Kanye West. Inspiration: 2020 is not a chill year given the coronavirus season, wildfire, diplomatic tensions, etc., but it boils down to one thing that has endured the test of time: Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker (That which does not kill me, makes me stronger). Creation: At first, I just wanted to record a piano version but it turns out erhu is such a magical fit to piano, so then the rest of the elements fell in one by one. Called the piece “Stärker...

1 minJAN 30
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #10: Stärker

Tenny's Tunes #9: C-Pop 101

Episode Notes [周杰倫 - 三年二班 Backing Track, by Studio One] Hi guys, welcome to episode nine of Tenny’s Tunes! I am your host, Tenny. As promised last time, I’ll be discussing C-pop, or Chinese pop music. People all over the world are familiar with K-pop, or Korean pop music and culture. From my understanding, the worldwide K-pop phenomenon took off in the 2000s and never really died down in terms of enthusiasm from fans. On the flip side, C-pop never achieved the same level of popularity, and fervor for C-pop remains mainly within Chinese-speaking communities, occasionally resonating with people from other cultures. Indeed, at first glance, K-pop shadows over C-pop in terms of its eye-catching fashion and flashiness. Sometimes, it doesn’t take rocket science for people to see the talent that many K-pop artists display. But it often takes more time and patience to discover the true value of certain things in life. C-pop is no exception to this rule. I don’t believe that I can...

4 min2019 NOV 19
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #9: C-Pop 101

Tenny's Tunes #8: Be The King, E-Dubble

Episode Notes [“Tribute to E-Dubble,” arranged by Tenny Tsang] Hi guys, welcome back to Tenny’s Tunes! I am your host Tenny. It’s been a while but I am back! We are continuing this series this year that I started around the same time last year. When I was considering what type of music to talk next, it occurred to me that I haven’t really touched on hip hop and rap. By that, I mean the kind of music that started with The Eagles, Michael Jackson (the King!) from around the ‘70s to Outkast and Kanye West in the 2000s. Of course, we still have very talented artists continuing the genre, but music these days are usually accompanied by some kind of sci-fi sound effects and whatnot. Anyways, I grew up in China and, throughout my childhood, experienced not only the golden period of C-Pop in the 2000s (something I will touch on in the next episode), but also American and European music. To be fair, 90 percent of which were from Michael Jackson’s albums. It was only when I came to the...

4 min2019 OCT 23
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #8: Be The King, E-Dubble

Tenny's Tunes Ep 7 - Practice, Practice, Practice

Episode Notes [I. Shinji, 1997 Evangelion Symphony by the New Japan Philharmonic] Hi guys! Welcome to episode seven of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host, Tenny. For the past couple episodes, we took a look at some of the greatest pieces composed during the Romantic period in the 19th century, from Rachmaninoff’s prelude to Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade. In analyzing and learning to perform what many people like to broadly call “classical pieces,” there is a certain level of freedom for you to create your unique interpretations, but in the end, you are to pretty much obligated to follow the notations for changes in loudness or texture of the sound set forth by the composers. For me personally, I started off learning classical pieces on the piano by memorizing the music scores, so music theory didn’t occur to me as something really important until the time I took some of the music level assessments that required me to learn theory. Still, it was solely for the purpose of passing th...

10 min2019 MAY 21
Comments
Tenny's Tunes Ep 7 - Practice, Practice, Practice

Tenny's Tunes Ep 6 - Rimsky-Korsakov and the Arabian Nights

Episode Notes Hi guys! Welcome to episode six of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Last time we discussed Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in C Sharp Minor, which describes his very own funeral he dreamed of as a 19-year-old. It was said that the piece grew so much in popularity that Rachmaninoff himself grew sick of playing the piece every time someone in the audience asked him to perform it. This week, we follow the same logic by briefly exploring another piece of music so popular that anyone studying orchestral music should know. Scheherazade, composed in 1888 by the great Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov who lived from 1844 to 1908. A brief background before we introduce Scheherazade, which is playing in the background. Rimsky-Korsakov was a Russian composer and a member of The Five, a group of prominent 19th-century Russian composers who were working on creating a distinct Russian classical music genre at the time. In particular, Rimsky-Korsakov developed a nationalistic style of classical m...

8 min2019 APR 23
Comments
Tenny's Tunes Ep 6 - Rimsky-Korsakov and the Arabian Nights

Latest Episodes

Tenny’s Tunes #15: Can Piano Sound Like Guitars

Episode Notes [“clavar la espada” by Shiro Sagisu] Hi guys, it’s Tenny. Welcome to episode 15 of Tenny’s Tunes. Hope everyone’s doing okay as we head into the final three months of 2020. I hope the worst times have passed, but yet I wonder if what is to come will be any better. I guess that sums up life in general. I have a question for you. Do you think pianos can sound like other instruments? We often hear people commenting on how flutes can sound like birds chirping, or clarinets at high pitches can resemble kettles with boiling water. But those are comparisons between a strictly defined musical instrument and a non-conventional instrument - because one can certainly make music out of anything in this day and age. With regards to piano, I often find it easy to emulate the sound of a choir from fugues by Bach with the distinct SATB voice lines. Step on the sustain pedal, and you have a Bach piece that sounds like it should be played in the church. More recently, I’ve started to take an interest in guitar, not in the sense that I have one and I am learning how to play it, but that I see similarities between the techniques used in guitar and piano performances. Specifically, the Spanish guitar, which is known for some of the most advanced techniques. As an example, the Spanish guitar often features picado, which is an alternate picking between the index and middle fingers as you hold your thumb onto the E string. This results in a fast-paced rhythmic repetition that goes either up or down the scale and, quite frankly, serves as the soul of a flamenco performance. Of course, there are also claps and singing that accompany a flamenco dancer, but if you only want to go with the essentials, a guitar is what matters the most from my experience. But don’t quote me on that. In this sense, piano and guitar are quite similar. Your fingers can move pretty fast up and down the keyboard, or repeat in a cycle of three notes to mimic that picado sound. There are limitations to how much a piano can try to reproduce a guitar piece, of course. For instance, traditional pianos can’t really do vibratos like guitars or violins, but I believe electric pianos can through certain functions. With that in mind, I bring to you today an attempt at interpreting a guitar/violin piece with piano. The piece is called “La Distancia Para Un Duelo” and has a Spanish feel to it. Hope you like it. You can also look up the original version on YouTube as well. I am Tenny, and this is NBN Audio. Peace. [“La distancia para un duelo” by Shiro Sagisu, performed by Tenny Tsang] This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

6 min2 w ago
Comments
Tenny’s Tunes #15: Can Piano Sound Like Guitars

Tenny’s Tunes #14: 千本桜 (Senbonzakura)

Episode Notes [“千本桜 (Senbonzakura)”] Hi guys, welcome to Episode 14 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host, Tenny. Hope everyone is safe and healthy. This was arguably the most popular Japanese song in 2014 (by Wagakki Band, a Japanese rock band that uses traditional instruments). I was still in middle school back then, and my range of preference for music was a bit narrow. The melody didn’t appeal to me for some reason, but at least it was pleasing to the ear. One thing I didn’t get was why people were so crazy over the tempo or speed of the song, creating their own versions and remixes that were even faster than the original piece. To me, showing off skills for the sake of it didn’t do the music justice at all. Nevertheless, I decided to revisit this piece in honor of that era. If you wanna see me playing it, here is the link to the video. Hope you enjoy. This is NBN Audio. [“千本桜 (Senbonzakura)”] Music performed by Tenny Tsang. This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

4 minMAY 27
Comments
Tenny’s Tunes #14: 千本桜 (Senbonzakura)

Tenny’s Tunes #13: Clair de Lune

Episode Notes Hi guys, welcome to Episode 13 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Hope everyone is safe and healthy.Inspiration: Back in high school, I volunteered at a local senior center and played piano music for the residents there. I would take requests to play certain pieces, but there’s one that I just did not take the time to learn. That’s right, it’s Clair de Lune by Claude Debussy, not the Beethoven Moonlight Sonata that some people might confuse it with. Even my good friends in college tell me, “You know Tenny, you really should know how to play this one.” Well, quarantine time means piano time for me!Creation: It took a lot of tries to nail this one. I played at a slower tempo than usual. It’s actually harder to play classical pieces on my MIDI keyboard than on a regular piano. Message: Haha, I was a bit lazy for the past few ones. We are all different people, but I will tell you what I got from the piece. How do you feel when you look at the moon at night? Do you prefer a crescent, a gibbous, a new moon or a full moon? Maybe a combination? I have no preference. To me, the moon is as fickle and elusive as it can be, but it still abides by the pattern of the moon phases every month. Humans are too. We all have a bottom line that we will never cross over, or else we cease to be humans. Alright, enjoy! This is NBN Audio. [“Clair de Lune” performed by Tenny Tsang]Music performed by Tenny Tsang.This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

7 minMAY 1
Comments
Tenny’s Tunes #13: Clair de Lune

Tenny's Tunes #12: Tchaikovsky Nocturne Op. 19 No. 4 in D minor

Episode Notes Hi guys, welcome to Episode 12 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Hope everyone is safe and healthy. Inspiration: I was very fortunate to be able to perform a cello piano duet of Tchaikovsky’s Nocturne No. 4 with an elderly French gentleman in Aix-en-Provence, France, the summer of 2019. I was studying abroad there for six weeks. Now, I want to return to this piece for memory sake after nearly a year. Creation: I was planning on recording the common piano solo version that’s in C sharp minor, but the key just didn’t sound right to me personally, perhaps because I originally played the duet version in D minor. So I took a U-turn halfway through recording and decided to stick to D minor key. Message: Not going to spoil it. We all have our own unique interpretations of this piece. Enjoy! [“Tchaikovsky Nocturne Op. 19 No. 4 in D minor (piano solo)” performed by Tenny Tsang] _Music performed by Tenny Tsang. _ This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

6 minAPR 16
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #12: Tchaikovsky Nocturne Op. 19 No. 4 in D minor

Tenny's Tunes #11: White Night March

Episode Notes [“White Night March” performed by Tenny Tsang] Hi guys, welcome to Episode 11 of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host, Tenny. Today, we are not going the fancy route. Just plain old piano with no other accompaniment. This piece is a movie soundtrack from Journey under the Midnight Sun, which came out around 2011. Original by Hirai Mamiko. Inspiration: Not much. I wanted to play this myself because I love it. Creation: This is an easy piece at first glance. But it does take effort to nail the intonation and articulation of each note and chord. Message: One cannot stare directly at the sun. Nor look directly into what’s in the heart. Original by Hirai Mamiko. Music performed by Tenny Tsang. This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

4 minFEB 18
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #11: White Night March

Tenny's Tunes #10: Stärker

Episode Notes [“Stärker” By Tenny Tsang] Hi guys, welcome to episode ten of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Before we dive in, I want to wish everyone a safe, healthy and successful 2020. For some time, I have been thinking of getting a good MIDI keyboard to make some simple music, and it just so happens that our current NBN editor-in-chief was selling one. So I got it from him and made this instrumental adaptation of “Stronger” using the piano and erhu, a Chinese string instrument. Original by Daft Punk and Kanye West. Inspiration: 2020 is not a chill year given the coronavirus season, wildfire, diplomatic tensions, etc., but it boils down to one thing that has endured the test of time: Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mich stärker (That which does not kill me, makes me stronger). Creation: At first, I just wanted to record a piano version but it turns out erhu is such a magical fit to piano, so then the rest of the elements fell in one by one. Called the piece “Stärker...

1 minJAN 30
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #10: Stärker

Tenny's Tunes #9: C-Pop 101

Episode Notes [周杰倫 - 三年二班 Backing Track, by Studio One] Hi guys, welcome to episode nine of Tenny’s Tunes! I am your host, Tenny. As promised last time, I’ll be discussing C-pop, or Chinese pop music. People all over the world are familiar with K-pop, or Korean pop music and culture. From my understanding, the worldwide K-pop phenomenon took off in the 2000s and never really died down in terms of enthusiasm from fans. On the flip side, C-pop never achieved the same level of popularity, and fervor for C-pop remains mainly within Chinese-speaking communities, occasionally resonating with people from other cultures. Indeed, at first glance, K-pop shadows over C-pop in terms of its eye-catching fashion and flashiness. Sometimes, it doesn’t take rocket science for people to see the talent that many K-pop artists display. But it often takes more time and patience to discover the true value of certain things in life. C-pop is no exception to this rule. I don’t believe that I can...

4 min2019 NOV 19
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #9: C-Pop 101

Tenny's Tunes #8: Be The King, E-Dubble

Episode Notes [“Tribute to E-Dubble,” arranged by Tenny Tsang] Hi guys, welcome back to Tenny’s Tunes! I am your host Tenny. It’s been a while but I am back! We are continuing this series this year that I started around the same time last year. When I was considering what type of music to talk next, it occurred to me that I haven’t really touched on hip hop and rap. By that, I mean the kind of music that started with The Eagles, Michael Jackson (the King!) from around the ‘70s to Outkast and Kanye West in the 2000s. Of course, we still have very talented artists continuing the genre, but music these days are usually accompanied by some kind of sci-fi sound effects and whatnot. Anyways, I grew up in China and, throughout my childhood, experienced not only the golden period of C-Pop in the 2000s (something I will touch on in the next episode), but also American and European music. To be fair, 90 percent of which were from Michael Jackson’s albums. It was only when I came to the...

4 min2019 OCT 23
Comments
Tenny's Tunes #8: Be The King, E-Dubble

Tenny's Tunes Ep 7 - Practice, Practice, Practice

Episode Notes [I. Shinji, 1997 Evangelion Symphony by the New Japan Philharmonic] Hi guys! Welcome to episode seven of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host, Tenny. For the past couple episodes, we took a look at some of the greatest pieces composed during the Romantic period in the 19th century, from Rachmaninoff’s prelude to Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade. In analyzing and learning to perform what many people like to broadly call “classical pieces,” there is a certain level of freedom for you to create your unique interpretations, but in the end, you are to pretty much obligated to follow the notations for changes in loudness or texture of the sound set forth by the composers. For me personally, I started off learning classical pieces on the piano by memorizing the music scores, so music theory didn’t occur to me as something really important until the time I took some of the music level assessments that required me to learn theory. Still, it was solely for the purpose of passing th...

10 min2019 MAY 21
Comments
Tenny's Tunes Ep 7 - Practice, Practice, Practice

Tenny's Tunes Ep 6 - Rimsky-Korsakov and the Arabian Nights

Episode Notes Hi guys! Welcome to episode six of Tenny’s Tunes. I am your host Tenny. Last time we discussed Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in C Sharp Minor, which describes his very own funeral he dreamed of as a 19-year-old. It was said that the piece grew so much in popularity that Rachmaninoff himself grew sick of playing the piece every time someone in the audience asked him to perform it. This week, we follow the same logic by briefly exploring another piece of music so popular that anyone studying orchestral music should know. Scheherazade, composed in 1888 by the great Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov who lived from 1844 to 1908. A brief background before we introduce Scheherazade, which is playing in the background. Rimsky-Korsakov was a Russian composer and a member of The Five, a group of prominent 19th-century Russian composers who were working on creating a distinct Russian classical music genre at the time. In particular, Rimsky-Korsakov developed a nationalistic style of classical m...

8 min2019 APR 23
Comments
Tenny's Tunes Ep 6 - Rimsky-Korsakov and the Arabian Nights
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