Himalaya-The Podcast Player

4.8K Ratings
Open In App
title

Climate Solutions (Audio)

UCTV

3
Followers
5
Plays
Climate Solutions (Audio)

Climate Solutions (Audio)

UCTV

3
Followers
5
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Presenting the University of California's top research in addressing the catastrophic impacts of climate change, while aggressively pursuing best practices to achieve carbon neutrality on all ten campuses by 2025. Visit http://www.uctv.tv/climate-solutions.

Latest Episodes

How Do We Know Humans are Impacting the Health of Our Planet? - Exploring Ethics

The ocean plays a major role in regulating Earth’s temperature through exchange of chemicals and microbes with the atmosphere. When waves break, ocean-derived biological species including viruses and bacteria are transferred into the atmosphere. These species can ultimately form clouds, altering precipitation and climate. Highlights will be presented of novel experiments being conducted in a unique ocean-atmosphere simulator developed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Aerosol Impacts on Chemistry of the Environment (CAICE). Kimberly Prather, Professor of Climate, Atmospheric Science, and Physical Oceanography at UC San Diego will focus on recent CAICE studies aimed at advancing our understanding of how the oceans influence human and planetary health. New insights will be discussed as well as future studies designed to unravel human versus microbial impacts on the changing Earth’s system. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 35000]

57 MINJAN 27
Comments
How Do We Know Humans are Impacting the Health of Our Planet? - Exploring Ethics

WiFire: Technology to Predict and Prevent the Spread of Wildfires

Researchers at UC San Diego are working on cutting edge technology to combat the constant threat of wildfires in California. The WIFIRE Lab is a collaboration between the Qualcomm Institute and the San Diego Supercomputer Center. The technology uses big data from cameras, weather stations, topography and other sources to quickly predict where wildfires will spread. And, it's not just theoretical. Fire departments like LAFD are actively using WIFIRE to get ahead of blazes before they get out of control. Series: "Computing Around UC" [Science] [Show ID: 35075]

8 MIN2019 NOV 12
Comments
WiFire: Technology to Predict and Prevent the Spread of Wildfires

A Climate Change Solution Beneath Our Feet

Skyelark Ranch, owned an operated by UC Davis graduate Alexis Robertson and her husband Gillies, uses rotational grazing while raising sheep, which can benefit plant growth, drought resistance, and the climate. The grazing encourages plant growth, which through photosynthesis, captures carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and stores it in the soil, where it can create healthier soils and stay out of our atmosphere. Series: "UCTV Prime" [Science] [Agriculture] [Show ID: 34110]

1 MIN2018 OCT 8
Comments
A Climate Change Solution Beneath Our Feet

What is Geoengineering and Can It Save the Planet

Can geoengineering save the planet? Injecting particles into the atmosphere to counter the warming effects of climate change would do nothing to offset the crop damage from rising global temperatures, according to a new analysis by UC Berkeley researchers. Shading the planet keeps things cooler, which helps crops grow better. But plants also need sunlight to grow, so blocking sunlight can affect growth. Series: "UC Berkeley News" [Science] [Show ID: 33999]

2 MIN2018 AUG 22
Comments
What is Geoengineering and Can It Save the Planet

Getting the Smoke Out of Our Eyes: Ashok Gadgil

As we rethink our energy use, we focus on the highest polluters, and at a global scale. But energy use at a much finer scale seriously threatens the health and safety of hundreds of millions of people who still cook on inefficient wood stoves in developing countries. Berkeley professor Ashok Gadgil and his students launched the Berkeley Darfur Stove project to design and build efficient and inexpensive stoves. They then created a non-profit to manufacture the $20 stoves in Mumbai. The stoves’ efficiency halves the fuel wood to cook each meal, and the time needed to collect it. Women purchasing fuel wood saved about $260 per year. Series: "Cal Future Forum: Our Changing World" [Science] [Show ID: 33083]

5 MIN2018 AUG 15
Comments
Getting the Smoke Out of Our Eyes: Ashok Gadgil

Cities Adaptations to Sea Level Rise: Kristina Hill

Since we don’t yet know how fast and how high sea levels are going to rise, Berkeley urban designer Kristina Hill stresses that our strategies must be ready and be adaptive as conditions change. Rising seas pose multiple dangers. Groundwater rises on top of sea level causing inland flooding. What can we do to prepare? Kristina Hill says a fundamental principle of landscape architecture -- "dig a hole, make a mound” -- offers a time-tested strategy. Series: "Climate Solutions " [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 33070]

5 MIN2018 AUG 7
Comments
Cities Adaptations to Sea Level Rise: Kristina Hill

Stillsuit for a City: David Sedlak

At a time of uncertain water supplies, how can we get the most use of our water? By passing water through a material called a reverse osmosis membrane, adding a small amount of hydrogen peroxide and exposing it to ultraviolet light, engineers in Orange County, California have been turning what used to be considered useless wastewater into drinking water for more than 25 years. David Sedlak’s research team at Berkeley has developed technologies to improve the treatment processes. Series: "Cal Future Forum: Our Changing World" [Science] [Show ID: 33071]

5 MIN2018 AUG 1
Comments
Stillsuit for a City: David Sedlak

Down the Climate Change Escalator: Bill Collins

We are on a straight-line trajectory that connects increased emissions to a much warmer and much stranger climate. Are there pathways for escaping from the up-escalator of climate change? UC Berkeley Professor Bill Collins examines the key culprits, carbon dioxide and “black carbon” from ordinary diesel combustion. Series: "Cal Future Forum: Our Changing World" [Science] [Show ID: 33068]

5 MIN2018 JUL 31
Comments
Down the Climate Change Escalator: Bill Collins

Sustainable Energy Science and Policy: Dan Kammen

Dan Kammen’s Berkeley research group has revealed the need for a dramatic shift to electricity and away from both fossil and biofuels. Meanwhile, 1.3 billion people – 15 percent of the world population – still lack electricity, and their growing demand for it would raise – not lower – global temperatures. The solution, Kammen says, must be local. He sees great promise in efforts to bring together new technologies with best practices to electrify those who don’t have power and to “green it” for everybody else. Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 33072]

5 MIN2018 JUL 26
Comments
Sustainable Energy Science and Policy: Dan Kammen

(Re)active Resilience: How to Thrive in a Changing Climate

Drawing on personal experiences of living with the Maasai tribe in east Africa and the Inuit of Greenland – whose cultures and resilience derive from living in constantly changing environments - Jacqueline McGlade explores how mind-sets, economies and ecosystems can become (re)active and more resilient to an increasingly uncertain world. McGlade has pioneered research in the dynamics of ecosystems, citizen science and social and environmental informatics. Series: "Bren School of Environmental Science & Management" [Science] [Show ID: 33663]

58 MIN2018 JUL 9
Comments
(Re)active Resilience: How to Thrive in a Changing Climate

Latest Episodes

How Do We Know Humans are Impacting the Health of Our Planet? - Exploring Ethics

The ocean plays a major role in regulating Earth’s temperature through exchange of chemicals and microbes with the atmosphere. When waves break, ocean-derived biological species including viruses and bacteria are transferred into the atmosphere. These species can ultimately form clouds, altering precipitation and climate. Highlights will be presented of novel experiments being conducted in a unique ocean-atmosphere simulator developed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for Aerosol Impacts on Chemistry of the Environment (CAICE). Kimberly Prather, Professor of Climate, Atmospheric Science, and Physical Oceanography at UC San Diego will focus on recent CAICE studies aimed at advancing our understanding of how the oceans influence human and planetary health. New insights will be discussed as well as future studies designed to unravel human versus microbial impacts on the changing Earth’s system. Series: "Exploring Ethics" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 35000]

57 MINJAN 27
Comments
How Do We Know Humans are Impacting the Health of Our Planet? - Exploring Ethics

WiFire: Technology to Predict and Prevent the Spread of Wildfires

Researchers at UC San Diego are working on cutting edge technology to combat the constant threat of wildfires in California. The WIFIRE Lab is a collaboration between the Qualcomm Institute and the San Diego Supercomputer Center. The technology uses big data from cameras, weather stations, topography and other sources to quickly predict where wildfires will spread. And, it's not just theoretical. Fire departments like LAFD are actively using WIFIRE to get ahead of blazes before they get out of control. Series: "Computing Around UC" [Science] [Show ID: 35075]

8 MIN2019 NOV 12
Comments
WiFire: Technology to Predict and Prevent the Spread of Wildfires

A Climate Change Solution Beneath Our Feet

Skyelark Ranch, owned an operated by UC Davis graduate Alexis Robertson and her husband Gillies, uses rotational grazing while raising sheep, which can benefit plant growth, drought resistance, and the climate. The grazing encourages plant growth, which through photosynthesis, captures carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and stores it in the soil, where it can create healthier soils and stay out of our atmosphere. Series: "UCTV Prime" [Science] [Agriculture] [Show ID: 34110]

1 MIN2018 OCT 8
Comments
A Climate Change Solution Beneath Our Feet

What is Geoengineering and Can It Save the Planet

Can geoengineering save the planet? Injecting particles into the atmosphere to counter the warming effects of climate change would do nothing to offset the crop damage from rising global temperatures, according to a new analysis by UC Berkeley researchers. Shading the planet keeps things cooler, which helps crops grow better. But plants also need sunlight to grow, so blocking sunlight can affect growth. Series: "UC Berkeley News" [Science] [Show ID: 33999]

2 MIN2018 AUG 22
Comments
What is Geoengineering and Can It Save the Planet

Getting the Smoke Out of Our Eyes: Ashok Gadgil

As we rethink our energy use, we focus on the highest polluters, and at a global scale. But energy use at a much finer scale seriously threatens the health and safety of hundreds of millions of people who still cook on inefficient wood stoves in developing countries. Berkeley professor Ashok Gadgil and his students launched the Berkeley Darfur Stove project to design and build efficient and inexpensive stoves. They then created a non-profit to manufacture the $20 stoves in Mumbai. The stoves’ efficiency halves the fuel wood to cook each meal, and the time needed to collect it. Women purchasing fuel wood saved about $260 per year. Series: "Cal Future Forum: Our Changing World" [Science] [Show ID: 33083]

5 MIN2018 AUG 15
Comments
Getting the Smoke Out of Our Eyes: Ashok Gadgil

Cities Adaptations to Sea Level Rise: Kristina Hill

Since we don’t yet know how fast and how high sea levels are going to rise, Berkeley urban designer Kristina Hill stresses that our strategies must be ready and be adaptive as conditions change. Rising seas pose multiple dangers. Groundwater rises on top of sea level causing inland flooding. What can we do to prepare? Kristina Hill says a fundamental principle of landscape architecture -- "dig a hole, make a mound” -- offers a time-tested strategy. Series: "Climate Solutions " [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 33070]

5 MIN2018 AUG 7
Comments
Cities Adaptations to Sea Level Rise: Kristina Hill

Stillsuit for a City: David Sedlak

At a time of uncertain water supplies, how can we get the most use of our water? By passing water through a material called a reverse osmosis membrane, adding a small amount of hydrogen peroxide and exposing it to ultraviolet light, engineers in Orange County, California have been turning what used to be considered useless wastewater into drinking water for more than 25 years. David Sedlak’s research team at Berkeley has developed technologies to improve the treatment processes. Series: "Cal Future Forum: Our Changing World" [Science] [Show ID: 33071]

5 MIN2018 AUG 1
Comments
Stillsuit for a City: David Sedlak

Down the Climate Change Escalator: Bill Collins

We are on a straight-line trajectory that connects increased emissions to a much warmer and much stranger climate. Are there pathways for escaping from the up-escalator of climate change? UC Berkeley Professor Bill Collins examines the key culprits, carbon dioxide and “black carbon” from ordinary diesel combustion. Series: "Cal Future Forum: Our Changing World" [Science] [Show ID: 33068]

5 MIN2018 JUL 31
Comments
Down the Climate Change Escalator: Bill Collins

Sustainable Energy Science and Policy: Dan Kammen

Dan Kammen’s Berkeley research group has revealed the need for a dramatic shift to electricity and away from both fossil and biofuels. Meanwhile, 1.3 billion people – 15 percent of the world population – still lack electricity, and their growing demand for it would raise – not lower – global temperatures. The solution, Kammen says, must be local. He sees great promise in efforts to bring together new technologies with best practices to electrify those who don’t have power and to “green it” for everybody else. Series: "UC Public Policy Channel" [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 33072]

5 MIN2018 JUL 26
Comments
Sustainable Energy Science and Policy: Dan Kammen

(Re)active Resilience: How to Thrive in a Changing Climate

Drawing on personal experiences of living with the Maasai tribe in east Africa and the Inuit of Greenland – whose cultures and resilience derive from living in constantly changing environments - Jacqueline McGlade explores how mind-sets, economies and ecosystems can become (re)active and more resilient to an increasingly uncertain world. McGlade has pioneered research in the dynamics of ecosystems, citizen science and social and environmental informatics. Series: "Bren School of Environmental Science & Management" [Science] [Show ID: 33663]

58 MIN2018 JUL 9
Comments
(Re)active Resilience: How to Thrive in a Changing Climate
hmly
Welcome to Himalaya Premium