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Future Ecologies

Future Ecologies

12
Followers
101
Plays
Future Ecologies

Future Ecologies

Future Ecologies

12
Followers
101
Plays
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About Us

Made for audiophiles and nature lovers alike, Future Ecologies is a podcast about the many ways we relate to our living planet. Every episode weaves together narrative storytelling, informative interviews, and science communication, supported by evocative soundscapes and music. Join us each month for a bold inquiry of how our attitude towards nature shapes every aspect of who we are.

Latest Episodes

Decolonize this Podcast

Future Ecologies is recorded on the unceded territories of the Musqueam (xwməθkwəy̓əm) Squamish (Skwxwú7mesh), and Tsleil- Waututh (Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh) Nations - otherwise known as Vancouver, British Columbia. But what does that mean? Find show notes for this episode at www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-1-decolonize-this-podcast

24 min2018 JUL 18
Comments
Decolonize this Podcast

This is Where it Begins

The story of modern-day North America begins with the systematic genocide and displacement of indigenous peoples. The social and ecological consequences of this founding trauma have become clearer over time, but so far relatively little has been done to address this at the federal, state, and provincial levels. In this episode, we zero in on two violently displaced tribes in California - the Wiyot and the Amah Mutsun - and tell the stories of their respective journeys to return to the spiritual centers of their worlds. Along the way, we ask a simple question: can the wrongs of the past be addressed, at least in part, by the return of stolen lands? Find show notes for this episode at www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-2-this-is-where-it-begins

56 min2018 JUL 20
Comments
This is Where it Begins

The Loneliest Plants

What do you do when you find the last individual of a species previously thought to be extinct? The two rarest plants on earth both live in the Presidio of San Francisco, they’re both in the same genus, and there’s only one left of each. Is there a future for these species, and if so, what does it look like? And what can species on the brink tell us about ourselves and the future of our ecosystems? Find show notes for this episode at www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-3-the-loneliest-plants

47 min2018 AUG 2
Comments
The Loneliest Plants

Luces en el Cielo

During the devastating September 9, 2017 earthquake off the coast of southern Mexico, residents of Mexico City and Quetzaltenango, Guatemala witnessed mysterious bursts of light in the sky. These lights, however, were not UFOs, exploding transformers, or evidence of a mysterious government conspiracy - instead, they were examples of a long-documented phenomenon known as “earthquake lights.” Can these mysterious lights in the sky help us learn to anticipate earthquakes? Can physicsexplain the strange animal behaviour linked to seismic activity? We unravel the science – and controversy – of a new interpretation of geophysics, and we talk to two groups developing very different technologies with the same goal: saving lives from earthquake disaster.

53 min2018 AUG 16
Comments
Luces en el Cielo

On Fire pt. 1 "Camas, Cores, and Spores"

The past two years have been the worst fire years on record across the west coast of North America, with whole communities being engulfed in flames and smoke enveloping major cities for weeks. But as the airways fill once again with stories of valiant fire-fighters and people who’ve lost their homes, we answer some burning questions that seem to always fly under the radar. For example: how long have fires been burning on this planet? Have our ecologies always been adapted to fire? What role did indigenous peoples play in lighting fires in the past? And how can we return prescribed burns to sensitive ecosystems? To answer these questions, we talk to regional experts, including internationally renowned ethnobotanist Dr. Nancy Turner, in this first part of our two-part series, On Fire. Find shownotes, sources, and musical credits at https://www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-5-on-fire-pt-1

50 min2018 AUG 31
Comments
On Fire pt. 1 "Camas, Cores, and Spores"

On Fire pt. 2 "Combustible Communities"

In this second part of our two-episode series, On Fire, we look at ways to move our civilization forward – without continuing to deny the role of fire in our landscapes. We discuss how prescribed burns are currently conducted, radical new (and old) perspectives on land management policy, and practical techniques for everyone in fire country to protect their homes, their communities, and their forests. Find shownotes, sources, and musical credits at https://www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-6-on-fire-pt-2

54 min2018 SEP 13
Comments
On Fire pt. 2 "Combustible Communities"

Help Not Helping

Almost exactly one year ago, a series of devastating earthquakes rocked southern Mexico. But what if it’s not the earthquakes themselves that pose the greatest threat to these communities? The conflict between institutional and grassroots disaster response in the aftermath of these earthquakes provides a powerful illustration of the tensions that have underlain the concept of development ever since President Truman’s second inaugural address in 1949. In this episode, Oaxacan deprofessionalized intellectual Gustavo Esteva guides us through his thinking on capitalism, disaster response, and what lies beyond development. Find shownotes, sources, and musical credits at https://www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-7-help-not-helping

52 min2018 SEP 28
Comments
Help Not Helping

Jellyfishing for Answers

How are human activities changing our oceans, and why do these changes all seem to support a new age of jellyfish? What are these ancient, diverse beings: harbingers of doom, or simply the most well-adapted form of life in the sea? In this episode we go jellyfishing for answers with preeminent jellyfish researchers Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin and Dr. Lucas Brotz. If you’d like to dive into more detail about a number of fascinating jellyfish species, we have a series of mini-episodes featuring Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin – available only to our Patreon supporters at www.patreon.com/futureecologies

51 min2018 OCT 25
Comments
Jellyfishing for Answers

Swimming Upstream

Dams remain one of the ultimate demonstrations of human power over nature. Wild rivers can be tamed to deliver energy for industry, lakes for recreation, and water for agriculture. But severing the link between land and sea has come with grave ecological costs. The impact of dams on salmon populations has been especially obvious and painful. This is part one of a two-part series on dam removals. In this episode, we return to the Klamath river to examine the fierce conflict (and unlikely partnerships) in pursuit of the deconstruction of 4 major dams.

47 min2018 NOV 9
Comments
Swimming Upstream

Rushing Downriver

In this conclusion to our series on dam removal, we travel from the Klamath up to the Olympic Peninsula, and the site of the former Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. What did it actually take to bring the dams down, and what lessons can we take forward to other ambitious ecosystem renewal projects? Corrections to this episode: - While salmon fry may have to contend with hungry bass in other river systems, the Elwha is not one of them. - The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife releases specifically Chinook salmon into the Elwha river.

38 min2018 NOV 22
Comments
Rushing Downriver

Latest Episodes

Decolonize this Podcast

Future Ecologies is recorded on the unceded territories of the Musqueam (xwməθkwəy̓əm) Squamish (Skwxwú7mesh), and Tsleil- Waututh (Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh) Nations - otherwise known as Vancouver, British Columbia. But what does that mean? Find show notes for this episode at www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-1-decolonize-this-podcast

24 min2018 JUL 18
Comments
Decolonize this Podcast

This is Where it Begins

The story of modern-day North America begins with the systematic genocide and displacement of indigenous peoples. The social and ecological consequences of this founding trauma have become clearer over time, but so far relatively little has been done to address this at the federal, state, and provincial levels. In this episode, we zero in on two violently displaced tribes in California - the Wiyot and the Amah Mutsun - and tell the stories of their respective journeys to return to the spiritual centers of their worlds. Along the way, we ask a simple question: can the wrongs of the past be addressed, at least in part, by the return of stolen lands? Find show notes for this episode at www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-2-this-is-where-it-begins

56 min2018 JUL 20
Comments
This is Where it Begins

The Loneliest Plants

What do you do when you find the last individual of a species previously thought to be extinct? The two rarest plants on earth both live in the Presidio of San Francisco, they’re both in the same genus, and there’s only one left of each. Is there a future for these species, and if so, what does it look like? And what can species on the brink tell us about ourselves and the future of our ecosystems? Find show notes for this episode at www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-3-the-loneliest-plants

47 min2018 AUG 2
Comments
The Loneliest Plants

Luces en el Cielo

During the devastating September 9, 2017 earthquake off the coast of southern Mexico, residents of Mexico City and Quetzaltenango, Guatemala witnessed mysterious bursts of light in the sky. These lights, however, were not UFOs, exploding transformers, or evidence of a mysterious government conspiracy - instead, they were examples of a long-documented phenomenon known as “earthquake lights.” Can these mysterious lights in the sky help us learn to anticipate earthquakes? Can physicsexplain the strange animal behaviour linked to seismic activity? We unravel the science – and controversy – of a new interpretation of geophysics, and we talk to two groups developing very different technologies with the same goal: saving lives from earthquake disaster.

53 min2018 AUG 16
Comments
Luces en el Cielo

On Fire pt. 1 "Camas, Cores, and Spores"

The past two years have been the worst fire years on record across the west coast of North America, with whole communities being engulfed in flames and smoke enveloping major cities for weeks. But as the airways fill once again with stories of valiant fire-fighters and people who’ve lost their homes, we answer some burning questions that seem to always fly under the radar. For example: how long have fires been burning on this planet? Have our ecologies always been adapted to fire? What role did indigenous peoples play in lighting fires in the past? And how can we return prescribed burns to sensitive ecosystems? To answer these questions, we talk to regional experts, including internationally renowned ethnobotanist Dr. Nancy Turner, in this first part of our two-part series, On Fire. Find shownotes, sources, and musical credits at https://www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-5-on-fire-pt-1

50 min2018 AUG 31
Comments
On Fire pt. 1 "Camas, Cores, and Spores"

On Fire pt. 2 "Combustible Communities"

In this second part of our two-episode series, On Fire, we look at ways to move our civilization forward – without continuing to deny the role of fire in our landscapes. We discuss how prescribed burns are currently conducted, radical new (and old) perspectives on land management policy, and practical techniques for everyone in fire country to protect their homes, their communities, and their forests. Find shownotes, sources, and musical credits at https://www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-6-on-fire-pt-2

54 min2018 SEP 13
Comments
On Fire pt. 2 "Combustible Communities"

Help Not Helping

Almost exactly one year ago, a series of devastating earthquakes rocked southern Mexico. But what if it’s not the earthquakes themselves that pose the greatest threat to these communities? The conflict between institutional and grassroots disaster response in the aftermath of these earthquakes provides a powerful illustration of the tensions that have underlain the concept of development ever since President Truman’s second inaugural address in 1949. In this episode, Oaxacan deprofessionalized intellectual Gustavo Esteva guides us through his thinking on capitalism, disaster response, and what lies beyond development. Find shownotes, sources, and musical credits at https://www.futureecologies.net/listen/fe1-7-help-not-helping

52 min2018 SEP 28
Comments
Help Not Helping

Jellyfishing for Answers

How are human activities changing our oceans, and why do these changes all seem to support a new age of jellyfish? What are these ancient, diverse beings: harbingers of doom, or simply the most well-adapted form of life in the sea? In this episode we go jellyfishing for answers with preeminent jellyfish researchers Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin and Dr. Lucas Brotz. If you’d like to dive into more detail about a number of fascinating jellyfish species, we have a series of mini-episodes featuring Dr. Lisa-ann Gershwin – available only to our Patreon supporters at www.patreon.com/futureecologies

51 min2018 OCT 25
Comments
Jellyfishing for Answers

Swimming Upstream

Dams remain one of the ultimate demonstrations of human power over nature. Wild rivers can be tamed to deliver energy for industry, lakes for recreation, and water for agriculture. But severing the link between land and sea has come with grave ecological costs. The impact of dams on salmon populations has been especially obvious and painful. This is part one of a two-part series on dam removals. In this episode, we return to the Klamath river to examine the fierce conflict (and unlikely partnerships) in pursuit of the deconstruction of 4 major dams.

47 min2018 NOV 9
Comments
Swimming Upstream

Rushing Downriver

In this conclusion to our series on dam removal, we travel from the Klamath up to the Olympic Peninsula, and the site of the former Elwha and Glines Canyon dams. What did it actually take to bring the dams down, and what lessons can we take forward to other ambitious ecosystem renewal projects? Corrections to this episode: - While salmon fry may have to contend with hungry bass in other river systems, the Elwha is not one of them. - The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife releases specifically Chinook salmon into the Elwha river.

38 min2018 NOV 22
Comments
Rushing Downriver
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