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LCIL International Law Seminar Series

Cambridge University

14
Followers
8
Plays
LCIL International Law Seminar Series

LCIL International Law Seminar Series

Cambridge University

14
Followers
8
Plays
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About Us

The Lauterpacht Centre for International Law is the scholarly home of International law at the University of Cambridge. The Centre, founded by Sir Elihu Lauterpacht QC in 1983, serves as a forum for the discussion and development of international law and is one of the specialist law centres of the Faculty of Law. The Centre holds weekly lectures on topical issues of international law by leading practitioners and academics.For more information see the LCIL website at http://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/

Latest Episodes

CILJ-LCIL Annual Lecture 2020-2021: 'Brexit and Fisheries: International Law Dimensions of the 2018 White Paper and Current Fisheries Bill' - Prof Andrew Serdy, University of Southampton

Lecture summary: With the EU demand for continued access to the UK's exclusive economic zone for its fishing vessels seemingly the main outstanding condition for a trade agreement with the UK, this presentation first extracts from the eponymous White Paper and Bill [Act] a number of international legal issues that they raise, before moving on to further matters given only sketchy treatment in, or omitted altogether from, those documents, on which a firmer position ought to have been taken. Lastly, a new problem apparent for the first time in the Bill is discussed: navigational freedom of foreign fishing vessels in the UK EEZ, and a missed opportunity to legislate a related evidential presumption that would assist future prosecutions for illegal fishing. Professor Andrew Serdy is Professor of the Public International Law of the Sea at the University of Southampton.

59 min1 w ago
Comments
CILJ-LCIL Annual Lecture 2020-2021: 'Brexit and Fisheries: International Law Dimensions of the 2018 White Paper and Current Fisheries Bill' - Prof Andrew Serdy, University of Southampton

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Two Visions of the International Rule of Law' - Monica Hakimi, University of Michigan Law School

Lecture summary: Two Visions of the International Rule of Law: When we speak of the rule of law, we generally mean to describe the attributes that make law, as an enterprise, worthwhile--the qualities that lead us to aspire to live in a society governed by law. Though international lawyers commonly invoke the concept, we have devoted little attention to explaining what it entails or how it translates to the international plane. This lecture will begin to fill that gap by presenting two distinct visions of the international rule of law. Each captures something important about law, but they are in certain respects incompatible. And while one already informs much of the thinking on international law, the second, which has largely been overlooked, might actually provide a more suitable framework for evaluating when and why international law is worthwhile.

34 minNOV 2
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Two Visions of the International Rule of Law' - Monica Hakimi, University of Michigan Law School

LCIL Friday lecture: 'Emptied Lands: Bedouin rights, dispossession and resistance in the Negev' - Prof Alexandre Kedar, University of Haifa

Professor Kedar will present his book Emptied Lands (co-authored with Amara and Yiftachel). Emptied Lands investigates the protracted legal, planning, and territorial conflict between the settler Israeli state and indigenous Bedouin citizens over traditional lands in southern Israel/Palestine. The authors place this dispute in historical, legal, geographical, and international- comparative perspectives, providing the first legal geographic analysis of the “dead Negev doctrine” used by Israel to dispossess and forcefully displace Bedouin inhabitants in order to Judaize the region. The authors reveal that through manipulative use of Ottoman, British and Israeli laws, the state has constructed its own version of terra nullius. Yet, the indigenous property and settlement system still functions, creating an ongoing resistance to the Jewish state. Emptied Lands critically examines several key land claims, court rulings, planning policies and development strategies, offering alternative local, regional, and international routes for justice.

44 minOCT 19
Comments
LCIL Friday lecture: 'Emptied Lands: Bedouin rights, dispossession and resistance in the Negev' - Prof Alexandre Kedar, University of Haifa

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Reforming the International Criminal Court' - Dr Douglas Guilfoyle, UNSW

Lecture summary: Over the last two years the court has faced a series of unprecedented challenges. We have seen a run of acquittals, case collapses, and greater and lesser scandals involving judges and the Office of the Prosecutor. While the Court has been buoyed by a number of significant convictions of rebellion leaders, momentum for an inquiry into the Court’s functioning and serious reform is gathering in the Assembly of States Parties. How has it come to this and what are the options going forward?

33 minJUN 2
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Reforming the International Criminal Court' - Dr Douglas Guilfoyle, UNSW

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law' - Dr Mohammad Shahabuddin, University of Birmingham

Lecture summary: While the Rohingya genocide is one of the worst incidents against minorities in recent times, ethno-nationalism and minority oppression in various forms and intensities are defining features of postcolonial states in general. Whereas most states, including Western liberal democracies, are not completely immune from ethno-nationalism and the minority ‘problem’, question remains, why are postcolonial states more vulnerable to this phenomenon? Also, why do postcolonial states respond to ethnic tensions in the manner in which they do? And, what role does international law play in all these? Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2021) analyses the geneses of ethno-nationalism in postcolonial states, and articulates how the postcolonial state operates as an ideology to address the ‘minority problem’. The ideological function of the postcolonial ‘national’, ‘liberal’, and ‘developmental’ state inflicts various forms of marginalisation on minorities but simultaneously justify the oppression in the name of national unity, equality and non-discrimination, and economic development. International law plays a central role in the ideological making of the postcolonial state in relation to postcolonial boundaries, liberal-individualist architecture of rights, and neoliberal economic vision of development. In the process, international law subjugates minority interests and in turn aggravates the problem of ethno-nationalism in postcolonial states. With these arguments, the book thus offers an ideology critique of the postcolonial state and examines the role of international law therein. Dr Mohammad Shahabuddin is a Reader in International Law and Human Rights at Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham. He is also a Faculty Member for Harvard Law School’s Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP). He holds a PhD in international law from SOAS, University of London. Shahab is the author of Ethnicity and International Law: Histories, Politics and Practices (Cambridge University Press, 2016). He has recently been awarded the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship (2018-2020) for writing his new monograph – Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2021).

40 minFEB 17
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law' - Dr Mohammad Shahabuddin, University of Birmingham

LCIL Panel Discussion: 'Business and Human Rights in Domestic Courts - Contemporary Developments and Future Prospects'

Richard Hermer QC, Barrister, Matrix Chambers and counsel for the Respondents in the Vedanta Resources case before the UK Supreme Court Richard Hermer QC’s practice spans public and private law litigation within both the domestic and international spheres. He has been instructed in many of the most high-profile cases heard by the English Courts over the past decade. He was called to the Bar in 1993 and took silk in 2009. He is recognised in the major legal directories as a leading practitioner in all his practice areas. Richard’s public international law cases include Al Jedda v Secretary of State for Defence, Jones v Saudi Arabia, Reyes v Al Maliki, Al Skeini v Secretary of State for Defence, Al Waheed v Secretary of State for Defence and Serdar Mohammed v Secretary of State for Defence. Richard was counsel for the Respondents in Vedanta Resources before the UK Supreme Court, and Okpabi v Royal Dutch Shell and AAA v Unilever before the Court of Appeal. He also represented the claimants in the ‘Trafigura Litigation’, one of the largest group actions in ever brought in England and in Bodo Community v Shell, a £55million settlement for environmental damage caused by pollution in the Niger Delta. Further information: https://www.matrixlaw.co.uk/member/richard-hermer/ Julianne Hughes-Jennett, Partner, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Julianne Hughes-Jennett is a partner in Quinn Emanuel's London office and a leading expert in the field of Business and Human Rights. Before joining the firm, Julianne was the head of the Hogan Lovells' Business and Human Rights Group and a member of the firm's, International Arbitration and Class Actions and Group Litigation Groups. Julianne is a solicitor advocate with full rights of audience for civil matters at all levels of the English Courts. She is recognized by Chambers and Partners Global as a "passionate and driven practitioner" known for her "great deal of work in dispute resolution and human rights due diligence". Further information: https://www.quinnemanuel.com/attorneys/hughes-jennett-julianne/ Dr Axel Marx, University of Leuven, Deputy Director of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies Founded in 2007, the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies is an interdisciplinary research centre of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the KU Leuven (University of Leuven). Axel has been involved as a research manager and senior researcher since its foundation. It was set up to promote, support and carry out high-quality international, innovative and interdisciplinary research on global governance. In addition to its fundamental research activities the Centre carries out independent applied research and offers innovative policy advice and solutions to policymakers on multilateral governance and global public policy issues. Since 2010, the Centre has been recognized as a KU Leuven Centre of Excellence and since 2016 as a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence. Axel was one of the principal authors of the Report Access to Legal Remedies for Victims of Corporate Human Rights Abuses in Third Countries (2019) produced for the European Parliament and requested by the European Parliament's Subcommittee on Human Rights. Further information: https://ghum.kuleuven.be/ggs/people/00008787 Dr Tara Van Ho, University of Essex, Lecturer and Leader of the Business and Human Rights Project at Essex, and Co-President of the Global Business and Human Rights Scholars Association Tara joined the School of Law and Human Rights Centre in January 2018. Her main research interests are business and human rights, investment law and human rights, economic, social and cultural rights, and transitional justice. She is the co-President of the Global Business and Human Rights Scholars Association and sits on the Editorial Board of the Business and Human Rights Journal. She is one of the leaders of the Essex Business and Human Rights Project, through which she advises states, intergovernmental organisations

55 min2019 DEC 9
Comments
LCIL Panel Discussion: 'Business and Human Rights in Domestic Courts - Contemporary Developments and Future Prospects'

LCIL Friday lecture: 'Legal Humanitarianism: the Restorative Turn in International Criminal Law' by Dr Sara Kendall, University of Kent

https://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/press/events/2019/11/lcil-friday-lecture-legal-humanitarianism-restorative-turn-international-criminal-law-dr-sara

43 min2019 NOV 15
Comments
LCIL Friday lecture: 'Legal Humanitarianism: the Restorative Turn in International Criminal Law' by Dr Sara Kendall, University of Kent

Evening Lecture: 'Law and Politics in the UN Climate Regime: A Preview of the Santiago Climate Conference' - Professor Daniel Bodansky, Arizona State University

Professor Daniel Bodansky will speak about ‘Law and Politics in the UN Climate Regime: A Preview of the Santiago Climate Conference.’ Followed by a Q&A. Is implementation of the Paris Agreement on track? What are the Agreement's prospects for success? The talk will review developments in the international climate change regime, including the recently concluded UN Climate Change Summit, analyze the state of play in the UNFCCC regime, and preview the upcoming conference of the parties (COP25) in Santiago in December. Professor Daniel Bodansky is Regents’ Professor at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. He served as Climate Change Coordinator at the U.S. State Department from 1999-2001. His book, The Art and Craft of International Environmental Law, received the 2011 Sprout Award from the International Studies Association as the best book that year in the field of international environmental studies. His latest book, International Climate Change Law, co-authored with Jutta Brunnée and Lavanya Rajamani, was published by Oxford University Press in June 2017, and received the 2018 Certificate of Merit from the American Society of International Law as the best book in a specialized area of international law published the previous year. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a graduate of Harvard (A.B.), Cambridge (M.Phil.) and Yale (J.D.).

89 min2019 NOV 8
Comments
Evening Lecture: 'Law and Politics in the UN Climate Regime: A Preview of the Santiago Climate Conference' - Professor Daniel Bodansky, Arizona State University

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'From Joining to Leaving: Domestic Law’s Role in the International Legal Validity of Treaty Withdrawal ' by Dr Hannah Woolaver, University of Capetown

Lecture Summary: If a state withdraws from a treaty in a manner that violates its own domestic law, will this withdrawal take effect in international law? The decisions to join and withdraw from treaties are both aspects of the state’s treaty-making capacity. However, while international law provides a role for domestic legal requirements in the international validity of a state’s consent when joining a treaty, it is silent on this question in relation to treaty withdrawal. This lecture will consider this issue in light of recent controversies concerning treaty withdrawal – including the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union, South Africa’s possible withdrawal from the International Criminal Court, and the threatened US denunciation of the Paris Agreement - and will propose that the law of treaties should be interpreted so as to develop international legal recognition for domestic rules on treaty withdrawal equivalent to that when states join treaties, such that a manifest violation of domestic law may invalidate a state’s treaty withdrawal in international law. Dr Hannah Woolaver is an Associate Professor in International Law at the Public Law Department of the University of Cape Town. She is also a Visiting Fellow at the University of New South Wales, Australia. Prior to coming to UCT, Hannah was awarded an LLB (First Class) at the University of Durham, BCL (Distinction) at the University of Oxford, and PhD at St. John’s College, University of Cambridge. Her doctoral thesis examined the principles of equality of States and non-intervention in relation to failed, rogue, and undemocratic States in international law. She teaches public international law and international criminal law at undergraduate and postgraduate level, and also supervises postgraduate research in these areas. Hannah is a visiting scholar at the Lauterpacht Centre for the Michaelmas Term 2019.

38 min2019 OCT 25
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'From Joining to Leaving: Domestic Law’s Role in the International Legal Validity of Treaty Withdrawal ' by Dr Hannah Woolaver, University of Capetown

International LCIL Workshop: The Future of Multilateralism: Panel III - Professor Catherine Barnard

Tuesday, 30 April 2019 - 9.00am Location: Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, Finley Library All-day workshop: 09:00 - 17:00 hrs Conveners: Eyal Benvenisti, Harold Hongju Koh, and Tomohiro Mikanagi In 2019 three major treaty withdrawals will reach important watersheds. Sometime in spring, the United Kingdom is scheduled to withdraw from the European Union under the withdrawal notice it gave under Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon. On November 4, 2019, the United States (under the administration of Donald Trump) is set to give notice that it will withdraw from the Paris Climate Change Accord one year later. In November 2019 the dispute resolution mechanism of the WTO will terminate effectively unless the US agrees to re-appoint a judge of the Appellate Body. These events may be seen as signaling a decline in leading states’ commitment to multilateralism and a growing preference to bilateralism. The Trump administration has clearly asserted its preference for bilateral deals w...

23 min2019 MAY 3
Comments
International LCIL Workshop: The Future of Multilateralism: Panel III - Professor Catherine Barnard

Latest Episodes

CILJ-LCIL Annual Lecture 2020-2021: 'Brexit and Fisheries: International Law Dimensions of the 2018 White Paper and Current Fisheries Bill' - Prof Andrew Serdy, University of Southampton

Lecture summary: With the EU demand for continued access to the UK's exclusive economic zone for its fishing vessels seemingly the main outstanding condition for a trade agreement with the UK, this presentation first extracts from the eponymous White Paper and Bill [Act] a number of international legal issues that they raise, before moving on to further matters given only sketchy treatment in, or omitted altogether from, those documents, on which a firmer position ought to have been taken. Lastly, a new problem apparent for the first time in the Bill is discussed: navigational freedom of foreign fishing vessels in the UK EEZ, and a missed opportunity to legislate a related evidential presumption that would assist future prosecutions for illegal fishing. Professor Andrew Serdy is Professor of the Public International Law of the Sea at the University of Southampton.

59 min1 w ago
Comments
CILJ-LCIL Annual Lecture 2020-2021: 'Brexit and Fisheries: International Law Dimensions of the 2018 White Paper and Current Fisheries Bill' - Prof Andrew Serdy, University of Southampton

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Two Visions of the International Rule of Law' - Monica Hakimi, University of Michigan Law School

Lecture summary: Two Visions of the International Rule of Law: When we speak of the rule of law, we generally mean to describe the attributes that make law, as an enterprise, worthwhile--the qualities that lead us to aspire to live in a society governed by law. Though international lawyers commonly invoke the concept, we have devoted little attention to explaining what it entails or how it translates to the international plane. This lecture will begin to fill that gap by presenting two distinct visions of the international rule of law. Each captures something important about law, but they are in certain respects incompatible. And while one already informs much of the thinking on international law, the second, which has largely been overlooked, might actually provide a more suitable framework for evaluating when and why international law is worthwhile.

34 minNOV 2
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Two Visions of the International Rule of Law' - Monica Hakimi, University of Michigan Law School

LCIL Friday lecture: 'Emptied Lands: Bedouin rights, dispossession and resistance in the Negev' - Prof Alexandre Kedar, University of Haifa

Professor Kedar will present his book Emptied Lands (co-authored with Amara and Yiftachel). Emptied Lands investigates the protracted legal, planning, and territorial conflict between the settler Israeli state and indigenous Bedouin citizens over traditional lands in southern Israel/Palestine. The authors place this dispute in historical, legal, geographical, and international- comparative perspectives, providing the first legal geographic analysis of the “dead Negev doctrine” used by Israel to dispossess and forcefully displace Bedouin inhabitants in order to Judaize the region. The authors reveal that through manipulative use of Ottoman, British and Israeli laws, the state has constructed its own version of terra nullius. Yet, the indigenous property and settlement system still functions, creating an ongoing resistance to the Jewish state. Emptied Lands critically examines several key land claims, court rulings, planning policies and development strategies, offering alternative local, regional, and international routes for justice.

44 minOCT 19
Comments
LCIL Friday lecture: 'Emptied Lands: Bedouin rights, dispossession and resistance in the Negev' - Prof Alexandre Kedar, University of Haifa

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Reforming the International Criminal Court' - Dr Douglas Guilfoyle, UNSW

Lecture summary: Over the last two years the court has faced a series of unprecedented challenges. We have seen a run of acquittals, case collapses, and greater and lesser scandals involving judges and the Office of the Prosecutor. While the Court has been buoyed by a number of significant convictions of rebellion leaders, momentum for an inquiry into the Court’s functioning and serious reform is gathering in the Assembly of States Parties. How has it come to this and what are the options going forward?

33 minJUN 2
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Reforming the International Criminal Court' - Dr Douglas Guilfoyle, UNSW

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law' - Dr Mohammad Shahabuddin, University of Birmingham

Lecture summary: While the Rohingya genocide is one of the worst incidents against minorities in recent times, ethno-nationalism and minority oppression in various forms and intensities are defining features of postcolonial states in general. Whereas most states, including Western liberal democracies, are not completely immune from ethno-nationalism and the minority ‘problem’, question remains, why are postcolonial states more vulnerable to this phenomenon? Also, why do postcolonial states respond to ethnic tensions in the manner in which they do? And, what role does international law play in all these? Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2021) analyses the geneses of ethno-nationalism in postcolonial states, and articulates how the postcolonial state operates as an ideology to address the ‘minority problem’. The ideological function of the postcolonial ‘national’, ‘liberal’, and ‘developmental’ state inflicts various forms of marginalisation on minorities but simultaneously justify the oppression in the name of national unity, equality and non-discrimination, and economic development. International law plays a central role in the ideological making of the postcolonial state in relation to postcolonial boundaries, liberal-individualist architecture of rights, and neoliberal economic vision of development. In the process, international law subjugates minority interests and in turn aggravates the problem of ethno-nationalism in postcolonial states. With these arguments, the book thus offers an ideology critique of the postcolonial state and examines the role of international law therein. Dr Mohammad Shahabuddin is a Reader in International Law and Human Rights at Birmingham Law School, University of Birmingham. He is also a Faculty Member for Harvard Law School’s Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP). He holds a PhD in international law from SOAS, University of London. Shahab is the author of Ethnicity and International Law: Histories, Politics and Practices (Cambridge University Press, 2016). He has recently been awarded the prestigious Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship (2018-2020) for writing his new monograph – Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2021).

40 minFEB 17
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'Minorities and the Making of Postcolonial States in International Law' - Dr Mohammad Shahabuddin, University of Birmingham

LCIL Panel Discussion: 'Business and Human Rights in Domestic Courts - Contemporary Developments and Future Prospects'

Richard Hermer QC, Barrister, Matrix Chambers and counsel for the Respondents in the Vedanta Resources case before the UK Supreme Court Richard Hermer QC’s practice spans public and private law litigation within both the domestic and international spheres. He has been instructed in many of the most high-profile cases heard by the English Courts over the past decade. He was called to the Bar in 1993 and took silk in 2009. He is recognised in the major legal directories as a leading practitioner in all his practice areas. Richard’s public international law cases include Al Jedda v Secretary of State for Defence, Jones v Saudi Arabia, Reyes v Al Maliki, Al Skeini v Secretary of State for Defence, Al Waheed v Secretary of State for Defence and Serdar Mohammed v Secretary of State for Defence. Richard was counsel for the Respondents in Vedanta Resources before the UK Supreme Court, and Okpabi v Royal Dutch Shell and AAA v Unilever before the Court of Appeal. He also represented the claimants in the ‘Trafigura Litigation’, one of the largest group actions in ever brought in England and in Bodo Community v Shell, a £55million settlement for environmental damage caused by pollution in the Niger Delta. Further information: https://www.matrixlaw.co.uk/member/richard-hermer/ Julianne Hughes-Jennett, Partner, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP Julianne Hughes-Jennett is a partner in Quinn Emanuel's London office and a leading expert in the field of Business and Human Rights. Before joining the firm, Julianne was the head of the Hogan Lovells' Business and Human Rights Group and a member of the firm's, International Arbitration and Class Actions and Group Litigation Groups. Julianne is a solicitor advocate with full rights of audience for civil matters at all levels of the English Courts. She is recognized by Chambers and Partners Global as a "passionate and driven practitioner" known for her "great deal of work in dispute resolution and human rights due diligence". Further information: https://www.quinnemanuel.com/attorneys/hughes-jennett-julianne/ Dr Axel Marx, University of Leuven, Deputy Director of the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies Founded in 2007, the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies is an interdisciplinary research centre of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the KU Leuven (University of Leuven). Axel has been involved as a research manager and senior researcher since its foundation. It was set up to promote, support and carry out high-quality international, innovative and interdisciplinary research on global governance. In addition to its fundamental research activities the Centre carries out independent applied research and offers innovative policy advice and solutions to policymakers on multilateral governance and global public policy issues. Since 2010, the Centre has been recognized as a KU Leuven Centre of Excellence and since 2016 as a Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence. Axel was one of the principal authors of the Report Access to Legal Remedies for Victims of Corporate Human Rights Abuses in Third Countries (2019) produced for the European Parliament and requested by the European Parliament's Subcommittee on Human Rights. Further information: https://ghum.kuleuven.be/ggs/people/00008787 Dr Tara Van Ho, University of Essex, Lecturer and Leader of the Business and Human Rights Project at Essex, and Co-President of the Global Business and Human Rights Scholars Association Tara joined the School of Law and Human Rights Centre in January 2018. Her main research interests are business and human rights, investment law and human rights, economic, social and cultural rights, and transitional justice. She is the co-President of the Global Business and Human Rights Scholars Association and sits on the Editorial Board of the Business and Human Rights Journal. She is one of the leaders of the Essex Business and Human Rights Project, through which she advises states, intergovernmental organisations

55 min2019 DEC 9
Comments
LCIL Panel Discussion: 'Business and Human Rights in Domestic Courts - Contemporary Developments and Future Prospects'

LCIL Friday lecture: 'Legal Humanitarianism: the Restorative Turn in International Criminal Law' by Dr Sara Kendall, University of Kent

https://www.lcil.cam.ac.uk/press/events/2019/11/lcil-friday-lecture-legal-humanitarianism-restorative-turn-international-criminal-law-dr-sara

43 min2019 NOV 15
Comments
LCIL Friday lecture: 'Legal Humanitarianism: the Restorative Turn in International Criminal Law' by Dr Sara Kendall, University of Kent

Evening Lecture: 'Law and Politics in the UN Climate Regime: A Preview of the Santiago Climate Conference' - Professor Daniel Bodansky, Arizona State University

Professor Daniel Bodansky will speak about ‘Law and Politics in the UN Climate Regime: A Preview of the Santiago Climate Conference.’ Followed by a Q&A. Is implementation of the Paris Agreement on track? What are the Agreement's prospects for success? The talk will review developments in the international climate change regime, including the recently concluded UN Climate Change Summit, analyze the state of play in the UNFCCC regime, and preview the upcoming conference of the parties (COP25) in Santiago in December. Professor Daniel Bodansky is Regents’ Professor at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. He served as Climate Change Coordinator at the U.S. State Department from 1999-2001. His book, The Art and Craft of International Environmental Law, received the 2011 Sprout Award from the International Studies Association as the best book that year in the field of international environmental studies. His latest book, International Climate Change Law, co-authored with Jutta Brunnée and Lavanya Rajamani, was published by Oxford University Press in June 2017, and received the 2018 Certificate of Merit from the American Society of International Law as the best book in a specialized area of international law published the previous year. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a graduate of Harvard (A.B.), Cambridge (M.Phil.) and Yale (J.D.).

89 min2019 NOV 8
Comments
Evening Lecture: 'Law and Politics in the UN Climate Regime: A Preview of the Santiago Climate Conference' - Professor Daniel Bodansky, Arizona State University

LCIL Friday Lecture: 'From Joining to Leaving: Domestic Law’s Role in the International Legal Validity of Treaty Withdrawal ' by Dr Hannah Woolaver, University of Capetown

Lecture Summary: If a state withdraws from a treaty in a manner that violates its own domestic law, will this withdrawal take effect in international law? The decisions to join and withdraw from treaties are both aspects of the state’s treaty-making capacity. However, while international law provides a role for domestic legal requirements in the international validity of a state’s consent when joining a treaty, it is silent on this question in relation to treaty withdrawal. This lecture will consider this issue in light of recent controversies concerning treaty withdrawal – including the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union, South Africa’s possible withdrawal from the International Criminal Court, and the threatened US denunciation of the Paris Agreement - and will propose that the law of treaties should be interpreted so as to develop international legal recognition for domestic rules on treaty withdrawal equivalent to that when states join treaties, such that a manifest violation of domestic law may invalidate a state’s treaty withdrawal in international law. Dr Hannah Woolaver is an Associate Professor in International Law at the Public Law Department of the University of Cape Town. She is also a Visiting Fellow at the University of New South Wales, Australia. Prior to coming to UCT, Hannah was awarded an LLB (First Class) at the University of Durham, BCL (Distinction) at the University of Oxford, and PhD at St. John’s College, University of Cambridge. Her doctoral thesis examined the principles of equality of States and non-intervention in relation to failed, rogue, and undemocratic States in international law. She teaches public international law and international criminal law at undergraduate and postgraduate level, and also supervises postgraduate research in these areas. Hannah is a visiting scholar at the Lauterpacht Centre for the Michaelmas Term 2019.

38 min2019 OCT 25
Comments
LCIL Friday Lecture: 'From Joining to Leaving: Domestic Law’s Role in the International Legal Validity of Treaty Withdrawal ' by Dr Hannah Woolaver, University of Capetown

International LCIL Workshop: The Future of Multilateralism: Panel III - Professor Catherine Barnard

Tuesday, 30 April 2019 - 9.00am Location: Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, Finley Library All-day workshop: 09:00 - 17:00 hrs Conveners: Eyal Benvenisti, Harold Hongju Koh, and Tomohiro Mikanagi In 2019 three major treaty withdrawals will reach important watersheds. Sometime in spring, the United Kingdom is scheduled to withdraw from the European Union under the withdrawal notice it gave under Article 50 of the Treaty of Lisbon. On November 4, 2019, the United States (under the administration of Donald Trump) is set to give notice that it will withdraw from the Paris Climate Change Accord one year later. In November 2019 the dispute resolution mechanism of the WTO will terminate effectively unless the US agrees to re-appoint a judge of the Appellate Body. These events may be seen as signaling a decline in leading states’ commitment to multilateralism and a growing preference to bilateralism. The Trump administration has clearly asserted its preference for bilateral deals w...

23 min2019 MAY 3
Comments
International LCIL Workshop: The Future of Multilateralism: Panel III - Professor Catherine Barnard
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