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The American Interest

The American Interest

12
Followers
28
Plays
The American Interest

The American Interest

The American Interest

12
Followers
28
Plays
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About Us

Host Richard Aldous, contributing editor of The American Interest and professor of history at Bard College, welcomes you to TAI's books podcast.

Latest Episodes

The Right Not To Be Lonely

Relevant Reading:Being Sure of Each Other: An Essay on Social Rights and Freedoms Kimberley Brownlee, Oxford University Press, 2020, $50 What are the ethical implications of the pandemic of loneliness that has been sweeping the modern world well before the COVID pandemic made us all grapple with social isolation? Do we have a human right […]

--2 d ago
Comments
The Right Not To Be Lonely

The Life and Art of Ornette Coleman

Maria Golia speaks with guest host Matt Hanson about her new book on jazz great Ornette Coleman.

--AUG 9
Comments
The Life and Art of Ornette Coleman

The New Authoritarian Temptation

In Twilight of Democracy, Anne Applebaum offers a personal reflection on the splitting of the anti-communist coalition—and asks why so many former friends have embraced illiberal movements across the West.

--JUL 24
Comments
The New Authoritarian Temptation

Strange Rites and New Religions with Tara Isabella Burton

Is America rapidly secularizing, or is it merely channeling religious impulses in new directions? In her new book Strange Rites, out today from PublicAffairs, Tara Isabella Burton makes the latter case, with examples from SoulCycle to social justice culture.

29 minJUN 17
Comments
Strange Rites and New Religions with Tara Isabella Burton

The Rise of Britain’s Intelligence Services

How did Britain's intelligence agencies rise to prominence, from World War I to the Cold War and beyond? Simon Ball's Secret History tells the story through the agencies' own internal case histories.

26 minJUN 6
Comments
The Rise of Britain’s Intelligence Services

The Making of Henry Kissinger

As Henry Kissinger turns 97 today, Barry Gewen joins the show to discuss his new intellectual biography of America's foremost realist.

--MAY 28
Comments
The Making of Henry Kissinger

Talking China (and Coronavirus) with Sulmaan Wasif Khan

What does the coronavirus pandemic tell us about the nature of modern China—and does the United States have a coherent strategy to deal with it? Sulmaan Wasif Khan, a China expert at Tufts University, joins the podcast to discuss.

--MAY 2
Comments
Talking China (and Coronavirus) with Sulmaan Wasif Khan

Furtwängler, Shostakovich, and Music in a Time of Crisis

Joseph Horowitz discusses his recent TAI essay on the wartime performances of two musical giants—and explains how great artists can "channel the moment" in a time of crisis.

--APR 11
Comments
Furtwängler, Shostakovich, and Music in a Time of Crisis

The Wall, the Square, and the Post-Cold War Order

Kristina Spohr's new book Post Wall, Post Square offers a vivid account of the decision-making that shaped the world order after 1989—and explains why what happened in Beijing mattered just as much as Berlin.

--APR 4
Comments
The Wall, the Square, and the Post-Cold War Order

How History Shaped Brexit

Why was the Brexit campaign so dominated by analogies to WWII, and what did it reveal about how the British imagine their past and future? David Reynolds probes these questions in Island Stories, his new "unconventional history of Britain."

--MAR 26
Comments
How History Shaped Brexit
the END

Latest Episodes

The Right Not To Be Lonely

Relevant Reading:Being Sure of Each Other: An Essay on Social Rights and Freedoms Kimberley Brownlee, Oxford University Press, 2020, $50 What are the ethical implications of the pandemic of loneliness that has been sweeping the modern world well before the COVID pandemic made us all grapple with social isolation? Do we have a human right […]

--2 d ago
Comments
The Right Not To Be Lonely

The Life and Art of Ornette Coleman

Maria Golia speaks with guest host Matt Hanson about her new book on jazz great Ornette Coleman.

--AUG 9
Comments
The Life and Art of Ornette Coleman

The New Authoritarian Temptation

In Twilight of Democracy, Anne Applebaum offers a personal reflection on the splitting of the anti-communist coalition—and asks why so many former friends have embraced illiberal movements across the West.

--JUL 24
Comments
The New Authoritarian Temptation

Strange Rites and New Religions with Tara Isabella Burton

Is America rapidly secularizing, or is it merely channeling religious impulses in new directions? In her new book Strange Rites, out today from PublicAffairs, Tara Isabella Burton makes the latter case, with examples from SoulCycle to social justice culture.

29 minJUN 17
Comments
Strange Rites and New Religions with Tara Isabella Burton

The Rise of Britain’s Intelligence Services

How did Britain's intelligence agencies rise to prominence, from World War I to the Cold War and beyond? Simon Ball's Secret History tells the story through the agencies' own internal case histories.

26 minJUN 6
Comments
The Rise of Britain’s Intelligence Services

The Making of Henry Kissinger

As Henry Kissinger turns 97 today, Barry Gewen joins the show to discuss his new intellectual biography of America's foremost realist.

--MAY 28
Comments
The Making of Henry Kissinger

Talking China (and Coronavirus) with Sulmaan Wasif Khan

What does the coronavirus pandemic tell us about the nature of modern China—and does the United States have a coherent strategy to deal with it? Sulmaan Wasif Khan, a China expert at Tufts University, joins the podcast to discuss.

--MAY 2
Comments
Talking China (and Coronavirus) with Sulmaan Wasif Khan

Furtwängler, Shostakovich, and Music in a Time of Crisis

Joseph Horowitz discusses his recent TAI essay on the wartime performances of two musical giants—and explains how great artists can "channel the moment" in a time of crisis.

--APR 11
Comments
Furtwängler, Shostakovich, and Music in a Time of Crisis

The Wall, the Square, and the Post-Cold War Order

Kristina Spohr's new book Post Wall, Post Square offers a vivid account of the decision-making that shaped the world order after 1989—and explains why what happened in Beijing mattered just as much as Berlin.

--APR 4
Comments
The Wall, the Square, and the Post-Cold War Order

How History Shaped Brexit

Why was the Brexit campaign so dominated by analogies to WWII, and what did it reveal about how the British imagine their past and future? David Reynolds probes these questions in Island Stories, his new "unconventional history of Britain."

--MAR 26
Comments
How History Shaped Brexit
the END
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