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Audio Diaries

KOSU

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Audio Diaries

Audio Diaries

KOSU

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Plays
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About Us

KOSU’s Audio Diaries are a collection of first-person oral histories recorded by Oklahomans. The project was launched during the COVID-19 pandemic as a way to create a space for communities to gather and listen while physically apart. KOSU partnered with the Oklahoma Historical Society to record and archive the audio diaries. The production is also in partnership with America Amplified, a CPB-funded initiative to use community engagement to inform local journalism.

Latest Episodes

'I Wanted Someone To Tell Me It Was Going To Be Okay'

Brittney Matlock has had a lot of big changes in the past couple months. On top of having a baby and learning her husband was immunocompromised - she and her mother, who co-own a business in Oklahoma City, have had to decide how to operate their three locations during a global pandemic. In her audio diary for KOSU - she talks about the hard costs of being open and the difficulties behind requiring a mask for all staff and visitors.

4 MIN6 d ago
Comments
'I Wanted Someone To Tell Me It Was Going To Be Okay'

'It's Difficult To Know If What We're Doing Is The Right Thing'

Michelle Smock is a small business owner in Norman. In her audio diary for KOSU, she discusses how anxious she felt when they initially closed down for two and a half months and how there wasn't a clear guide on how to open back up or what to do if an employee contracted COVID-19.

3 MIN1 w ago
Comments
'It's Difficult To Know If What We're Doing Is The Right Thing'

'I Really Hadn't Thought About Who Would Care For Me And My Well-Being Because My Mom Did That'

Jennifer Thomas is self-employed, 36-year-old black woman living in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In her audio diary for KOSU, she discusses her fears and thankfulness for those around her while waiting for her results from the COVID-19 test she had on June 26th.

4 MINJUN 30
Comments
'I Really Hadn't Thought About Who Would Care For Me And My Well-Being Because My Mom Did That'

'It Gets Tiring Trying To Carve Out A Place For Myself'

Avery Marshall is a black trans man living and working in Tulsa. In the past several months, he has gone through a lot of change - working from home with his fiancé, postponing their wedding over COVID-19 concerns and recovering from top surgery. In his audio diary, Avery talks about the worries he has even in his regular tasks – like walking his dog, Chugg - and also how he feels about this particular Pride Month.

4 MINJUN 16
Comments
'It Gets Tiring Trying To Carve Out A Place For Myself'

'It's A Constant Discipline To Stay In The Here And Now'

Liz Fletcher's husband has cystic fibrosis, so she was already being precautious when out in public before the COVID-19 pandemic. In her audio diary for KOSU, Fletcher, who is a psychotherapist, says she's worried about when she may have to return to work in-person and what that could mean for the health of her husband and her patients.

4 MINJUN 11
Comments
'It's A Constant Discipline To Stay In The Here And Now'

'Who Do You Call When It's The Police That Are Doing The Crime?'

Following the recent killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, North Tulsa resident Sondra Slade and her family are having talks about being black in America. In her audio diary for KOSU, Slade talks about her worries as a parent and how these events are affecting her kids.

4 MINJUN 9
Comments
'Who Do You Call When It's The Police That Are Doing The Crime?'

'Right Now The Only Thing I Can Do Is Hold My Breath'

RJ Young no longer considers COVID-19 as the biggest threat to his health. As a millennial black man living in Tulsa, he says racism has – yet again – become the greatest threat to his well-being. In his audio diary, Young talks about the latest Black Lives Matter protests and how he is terrified to be a black man living in the city that, nearly a century ago, was the site of one of the worst acts of racial violence.

4 MINJUN 2
Comments
'Right Now The Only Thing I Can Do Is Hold My Breath'

'Life at Home - It Was Full Before the Pandemic and It's Full Now'

Like many of us, Robert LaBorde's daily routines have been impacted by COVID-19 - but that hasn't stopped him from living a full life. In his audio diary, he talks about being a caregiver for his mother-in-law, experiencing loss during a pandemic and how joy can still be found when plans fall by the wayside.

4 MINMAY 19
Comments
'Life at Home - It Was Full Before the Pandemic and It's Full Now'

'How Am I Going to Pick Myself up and Get Back to Doing What I Had Pictured for Myself?'

Phoebe Butts has big dreams of being on a Broadway stage. The Oklahoma City-native moved to New York City in February, right before the city became an epicenter for COVID-19. In her audio diary, she talks about being diagnosed with COVID-19 and shares a moment of togetherness in the city that never sleeps.

4 MINMAY 12
Comments
'How Am I Going to Pick Myself up and Get Back to Doing What I Had Pictured for Myself?'

'I Didn't Even Get Myself Mentally and Emotionally Ready for Saying Goodbye to My Classmates'

Nathan Jacob won't have a typical graduation later this month due to COVID-19 - like many students who are in their final year of school.In his audio diary, he talks about how he works through the change of being an active student to working from home and living with his parents and his brother, Joel.

4 MINMAY 12
Comments
'I Didn't Even Get Myself Mentally and Emotionally Ready for Saying Goodbye to My Classmates'

Latest Episodes

'I Wanted Someone To Tell Me It Was Going To Be Okay'

Brittney Matlock has had a lot of big changes in the past couple months. On top of having a baby and learning her husband was immunocompromised - she and her mother, who co-own a business in Oklahoma City, have had to decide how to operate their three locations during a global pandemic. In her audio diary for KOSU - she talks about the hard costs of being open and the difficulties behind requiring a mask for all staff and visitors.

4 MIN6 d ago
Comments
'I Wanted Someone To Tell Me It Was Going To Be Okay'

'It's Difficult To Know If What We're Doing Is The Right Thing'

Michelle Smock is a small business owner in Norman. In her audio diary for KOSU, she discusses how anxious she felt when they initially closed down for two and a half months and how there wasn't a clear guide on how to open back up or what to do if an employee contracted COVID-19.

3 MIN1 w ago
Comments
'It's Difficult To Know If What We're Doing Is The Right Thing'

'I Really Hadn't Thought About Who Would Care For Me And My Well-Being Because My Mom Did That'

Jennifer Thomas is self-employed, 36-year-old black woman living in Tulsa, Oklahoma. In her audio diary for KOSU, she discusses her fears and thankfulness for those around her while waiting for her results from the COVID-19 test she had on June 26th.

4 MINJUN 30
Comments
'I Really Hadn't Thought About Who Would Care For Me And My Well-Being Because My Mom Did That'

'It Gets Tiring Trying To Carve Out A Place For Myself'

Avery Marshall is a black trans man living and working in Tulsa. In the past several months, he has gone through a lot of change - working from home with his fiancé, postponing their wedding over COVID-19 concerns and recovering from top surgery. In his audio diary, Avery talks about the worries he has even in his regular tasks – like walking his dog, Chugg - and also how he feels about this particular Pride Month.

4 MINJUN 16
Comments
'It Gets Tiring Trying To Carve Out A Place For Myself'

'It's A Constant Discipline To Stay In The Here And Now'

Liz Fletcher's husband has cystic fibrosis, so she was already being precautious when out in public before the COVID-19 pandemic. In her audio diary for KOSU, Fletcher, who is a psychotherapist, says she's worried about when she may have to return to work in-person and what that could mean for the health of her husband and her patients.

4 MINJUN 11
Comments
'It's A Constant Discipline To Stay In The Here And Now'

'Who Do You Call When It's The Police That Are Doing The Crime?'

Following the recent killings of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, North Tulsa resident Sondra Slade and her family are having talks about being black in America. In her audio diary for KOSU, Slade talks about her worries as a parent and how these events are affecting her kids.

4 MINJUN 9
Comments
'Who Do You Call When It's The Police That Are Doing The Crime?'

'Right Now The Only Thing I Can Do Is Hold My Breath'

RJ Young no longer considers COVID-19 as the biggest threat to his health. As a millennial black man living in Tulsa, he says racism has – yet again – become the greatest threat to his well-being. In his audio diary, Young talks about the latest Black Lives Matter protests and how he is terrified to be a black man living in the city that, nearly a century ago, was the site of one of the worst acts of racial violence.

4 MINJUN 2
Comments
'Right Now The Only Thing I Can Do Is Hold My Breath'

'Life at Home - It Was Full Before the Pandemic and It's Full Now'

Like many of us, Robert LaBorde's daily routines have been impacted by COVID-19 - but that hasn't stopped him from living a full life. In his audio diary, he talks about being a caregiver for his mother-in-law, experiencing loss during a pandemic and how joy can still be found when plans fall by the wayside.

4 MINMAY 19
Comments
'Life at Home - It Was Full Before the Pandemic and It's Full Now'

'How Am I Going to Pick Myself up and Get Back to Doing What I Had Pictured for Myself?'

Phoebe Butts has big dreams of being on a Broadway stage. The Oklahoma City-native moved to New York City in February, right before the city became an epicenter for COVID-19. In her audio diary, she talks about being diagnosed with COVID-19 and shares a moment of togetherness in the city that never sleeps.

4 MINMAY 12
Comments
'How Am I Going to Pick Myself up and Get Back to Doing What I Had Pictured for Myself?'

'I Didn't Even Get Myself Mentally and Emotionally Ready for Saying Goodbye to My Classmates'

Nathan Jacob won't have a typical graduation later this month due to COVID-19 - like many students who are in their final year of school.In his audio diary, he talks about how he works through the change of being an active student to working from home and living with his parents and his brother, Joel.

4 MINMAY 12
Comments
'I Didn't Even Get Myself Mentally and Emotionally Ready for Saying Goodbye to My Classmates'
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