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Arizona Science

Arizona Public Media

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Arizona Science

Arizona Science

Arizona Public Media

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Followers
1
Plays
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About Us

Arizona Science explores the latest scientific research and technological innovations taking place in Southern Arizona and at the University of Arizona. Catch Arizona Science each Friday during Science Friday on NPR 89.1.

Latest Episodes

Episode 220: Understanding the positives and negatives of machine learning

University of Arizona computer scientist Carlos Scheidegger is studying how we interpret huge data sets that allow computers to improve our lives. But he warns there are perils along with the promise that machine learning brings to society. Scheidegger will be a featured speaker at the College of Science's annual public lecture series Tuesday, Feb. 25.

5 MIN23 h ago
Comments
Episode 220: Understanding the positives and negatives of machine learning

Episode 219: What the future holds for biodiversity on our planet

Biodiversity and ecosystems connect Earth's living and physical components. But from lowland tropical forests to alpine wetlands, the biosphere is changing fast. Ahead of his presentation at this year's University of Arizona College of Science lecture series, UA Ecology and Evolutionary Biology professor Brian Enquist talks about the future of the biosphere and how much time we have left to promote a sustainable earth.

5 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 219: What the future holds for biodiversity on our planet

Episode 219: Exploring virtual reality

Virtual reality is something we experience in computer gaming, but it can also be useful in other ways. University of Arizona psychology professor Arne Ekstrom is investigating how virtual reality can help workers navigate hazardous waste sites and allow doctors to perform remote surgery. He asks if moving our body is necessary for a normal experience of space.

5 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Episode 219: Exploring virtual reality

Episode 218: How extraterrestrial life could affect us on Earth

Technology used to detect life on other worlds is improving and researchers could be less than ten years away from making a discovery that will change biological science forever. University of Arizona Distinguished Professor of Astronomy Chris Impey talks about the likelihood of finding microbes in our ongoing search for life on other worlds. He is one of the presenters in this year's College of Science public lecture series on the U of A campus in February.

5 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Episode 218: How extraterrestrial life could affect us on Earth

Episode 217: Problem-solving on the Navajo Nation

University of Arizona engineering students and faculty are investigating food, energy, and water security issues affecting Native Americans.

5 MINJAN 24
Comments
Episode 217: Problem-solving on the Navajo Nation

Episode 216: Exercise, stress and the immune system

University of Arizona nutritional sciences professor Richard Simpson studies how our exercise habits connect with the body's ability to fight illness. He's looked at how short-term stress effects can be beneficial, and has also researched how exercise can help fight cancer.

5 MINJAN 17
Comments
Episode 216: Exercise, stress and the immune system

Episode 215: Conducting research on the cutting edge of particle physics

University of Arizona physics professor John Rutherfoord is working on projects at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. It is the largest and highest-energy particle collider in the world, and Rutherford says it is helping scientists make discoveries basic to our understanding of the known universe.

5 MINJAN 10
Comments
Episode 215: Conducting research on the cutting edge of particle physics

Episode 214: The origin of our moon

In 1974, Planetary Sciences Institute senior scientist emeritus Bill Hartmann and Don Davis developed the modern theory about how the moon was formed. Hartmann says the latest computer models confirm his analysis that the moon was created from the remnants of a giant object's impact with the Earth 4.5 billion years ago.

5 MINJAN 3
Comments
Episode 214: The origin of our moon

Episode 213: Creating new tools to find out how cells in the human body work

University of Arizona chemistry and biochemistry professor Craig Aspinwall is investigating the signaling pathways inside our cells. He is using novel methods for measuring molecules to make “mini-movies” of chemistry at work in important cellular functions. Prof. Aspinwall says the new measurement platforms he's developing can enable a more detailed picture of how normal cells work and how diseases evolve.

5 MIN2019 DEC 20
Comments
Episode 213: Creating new tools to find out how cells in the human body work

Episode 212: Vertical farming

As our global population grows, we must find ways to increase the production of food crops, even in the face of climate change’s complex effects on farming. University of Arizona Agricultural and Biological Engineering professor Joel Cuello is developing vertical farming methods that make efficient use of water and do not use soil or pesticides or depend on weather.

5 MIN2019 DEC 13
Comments
Episode 212: Vertical farming

Latest Episodes

Episode 220: Understanding the positives and negatives of machine learning

University of Arizona computer scientist Carlos Scheidegger is studying how we interpret huge data sets that allow computers to improve our lives. But he warns there are perils along with the promise that machine learning brings to society. Scheidegger will be a featured speaker at the College of Science's annual public lecture series Tuesday, Feb. 25.

5 MIN23 h ago
Comments
Episode 220: Understanding the positives and negatives of machine learning

Episode 219: What the future holds for biodiversity on our planet

Biodiversity and ecosystems connect Earth's living and physical components. But from lowland tropical forests to alpine wetlands, the biosphere is changing fast. Ahead of his presentation at this year's University of Arizona College of Science lecture series, UA Ecology and Evolutionary Biology professor Brian Enquist talks about the future of the biosphere and how much time we have left to promote a sustainable earth.

5 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 219: What the future holds for biodiversity on our planet

Episode 219: Exploring virtual reality

Virtual reality is something we experience in computer gaming, but it can also be useful in other ways. University of Arizona psychology professor Arne Ekstrom is investigating how virtual reality can help workers navigate hazardous waste sites and allow doctors to perform remote surgery. He asks if moving our body is necessary for a normal experience of space.

5 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Episode 219: Exploring virtual reality

Episode 218: How extraterrestrial life could affect us on Earth

Technology used to detect life on other worlds is improving and researchers could be less than ten years away from making a discovery that will change biological science forever. University of Arizona Distinguished Professor of Astronomy Chris Impey talks about the likelihood of finding microbes in our ongoing search for life on other worlds. He is one of the presenters in this year's College of Science public lecture series on the U of A campus in February.

5 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Episode 218: How extraterrestrial life could affect us on Earth

Episode 217: Problem-solving on the Navajo Nation

University of Arizona engineering students and faculty are investigating food, energy, and water security issues affecting Native Americans.

5 MINJAN 24
Comments
Episode 217: Problem-solving on the Navajo Nation

Episode 216: Exercise, stress and the immune system

University of Arizona nutritional sciences professor Richard Simpson studies how our exercise habits connect with the body's ability to fight illness. He's looked at how short-term stress effects can be beneficial, and has also researched how exercise can help fight cancer.

5 MINJAN 17
Comments
Episode 216: Exercise, stress and the immune system

Episode 215: Conducting research on the cutting edge of particle physics

University of Arizona physics professor John Rutherfoord is working on projects at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. It is the largest and highest-energy particle collider in the world, and Rutherford says it is helping scientists make discoveries basic to our understanding of the known universe.

5 MINJAN 10
Comments
Episode 215: Conducting research on the cutting edge of particle physics

Episode 214: The origin of our moon

In 1974, Planetary Sciences Institute senior scientist emeritus Bill Hartmann and Don Davis developed the modern theory about how the moon was formed. Hartmann says the latest computer models confirm his analysis that the moon was created from the remnants of a giant object's impact with the Earth 4.5 billion years ago.

5 MINJAN 3
Comments
Episode 214: The origin of our moon

Episode 213: Creating new tools to find out how cells in the human body work

University of Arizona chemistry and biochemistry professor Craig Aspinwall is investigating the signaling pathways inside our cells. He is using novel methods for measuring molecules to make “mini-movies” of chemistry at work in important cellular functions. Prof. Aspinwall says the new measurement platforms he's developing can enable a more detailed picture of how normal cells work and how diseases evolve.

5 MIN2019 DEC 20
Comments
Episode 213: Creating new tools to find out how cells in the human body work

Episode 212: Vertical farming

As our global population grows, we must find ways to increase the production of food crops, even in the face of climate change’s complex effects on farming. University of Arizona Agricultural and Biological Engineering professor Joel Cuello is developing vertical farming methods that make efficient use of water and do not use soil or pesticides or depend on weather.

5 MIN2019 DEC 13
Comments
Episode 212: Vertical farming
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