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Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

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Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

Centre for Advanced Study (CAS) at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters

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Get a glimpse of outstanding fundamental research! In this podcast, scholars from all over the world talk about everything from the relationships between dogs and humans to the unforeseen consequences of glaciers’ retreat. CAS (Senter for grunnforskning / Centre for Advanced Study) hosts three international and interdisciplinary research groups each year. 799785

Latest Episodes

John Comaroff: Conflict and (Dis)order Among Tswana in Colonial and Postcolonial South Africa

John Comaroff, one of the world's leading anthropologists, gives a lecture on the Tswana people in Southern Africa in this CAS seminar. Read more about this seminar on the CAS website: https://cas.oslo.no/listen/john-comaroff-conflict-and-dis-order-among-tswana-in-colonial-and-postcolonial-south-africa-article2849-1169.html

67 MIN2017 DEC 8
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John Comaroff: Conflict and (Dis)order Among Tswana in Colonial and Postcolonial South Africa

Forskningsdagene 2017: Dag O. Hessen om naturens verdi.

Under Forskningsdagene 2017 avholdt Senter for grunnforskning (CAS Oslo) forskerstafett, hvor 6 forskere fikk 12 minutter hver til å snakke om forskning og verdier. I dette innslaget snakker biolog Dag O. Hessen om de mangfoldige verdiene av natur. (Grunnet tekniske problemer har vi dessverre ikke opptak av de andre innslagene)

11 MIN2017 OCT 12
Comments
Forskningsdagene 2017: Dag O. Hessen om naturens verdi.

Levi Bryant: a critique of object-oriented philosophy

In the talk “Object and fold: a critique of object-oriented philosophy”, given at Litteraturhuset in Oslo June 9 2017, philosopher Levi R. Bryant talks about the history of speculative realism and object-oriented ontology. He then moves into a brief discussion of Graham Harman’s object-oriented philosophy, and he lays out an alternative vision he would like to propose. Levi R. Bryant is Professor of Philosophy at Collin College, Texas, and author of several books and articles focusing on object-oriented ontology. He has also written extensively about post-structural and cultural theory. His first book Difference and Givenness: Deleuze’s Transcendental Empiricism and the Ontology of Immanence was published in 2008, and is based on his doctoral research. He has since published The Democracry of Objects (2011), and his latest book Onto-Cartography: An Ontology of Machines and Media (2014). He is co-editor of The Speculative Turn together with Nick Srnicek and Graham Harman. In her ...

38 MIN2017 JUN 30
Comments
Levi Bryant: a critique of object-oriented philosophy

Robert Macfarlane: – We are the Generation Anthropocene

– We are Generation Anthropocene, Robert Macfarlane says, but argues that our need for change seems to greatly exceed our capacity to exert it. April 6 2017 writer and scholar Robert Macfarlane gave the talk Deep Time, Thin Place And Thick Speech in the Anthropocene at Litteraturhuset in Oslo. Macfarlane was invited, and the talk was organised by, the CAS research group After Discourse: Things, Archaeology, and Heritage in the 21st Century. Extracts from the "Polar Day" sonification are used by kind permission of its creators, Mark Ballora and Matthew Kenny, using data collected by the paleoclimate scientist David Pollard. http://music.psu.edu/faculty/mark-ballora

54 MIN2017 APR 26
Comments
Robert Macfarlane: – We are the Generation Anthropocene

Glaciers retreat: - The mountain is sad

Glaciers are found on every continent, and they are all changing in the same way: they are retreating, melting. Social anthropologist Professor Ben Orlove calls glaciers “magnificent and extraordinary”, and their retreat a tragedy. We have talked with him about why glaciers are so great, and the central role they play in humans lives all over the world, from energy to religion. Professor Orlove once took part in a pilgrimage in the Peruvian Andes. - I’ve actually heard conversations between some of the pilgrims about whether the mountain is angry or sad, and they pretty much agreed that the mountain is sad: it’s sad about the state of the world. Audio: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen Music: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen/Shutterstock Photo: Shutterstock

22 MIN2016 AUG 31
Comments
Glaciers retreat: - The mountain is sad

What dog skeletons tell us about the long-lasting relationship between humans and dogs

In CAS’ second podcast we talk with CAS-fellow and archaeologist Professor Robert Losey about his research in Siberia on dog skeletons that are thousands of years old, how and why humans and dogs get along so well, and his personal relationship with his dog Guinness. - Dogs and wolves have the capacities for these relationships on a genetic basis, but these early dogs may have initiated associating and living among humans on their own, Professor Losey says. Audio: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen Music: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen Photo: Robert Losey

22 MIN2016 JUN 15
Comments
What dog skeletons tell us about the long-lasting relationship between humans and dogs

Sense a different Arctic: a guided tour of the exhibition NyArktis (in Norwegian)

In the exhibition NyArktis, CAS researchers challenge portrayals of the Arctic as bare and without human’s presence, and experiment in new ways of presenting the region. In the Centre´s first podcast project leader Gro Ween guides us through the exhibition NyArktis- an exhibition by researchers in the CAS project Artic Domestication in the era of the Anthropocene.

21 MIN2016 JUN 10
Comments
Sense a different Arctic: a guided tour of the exhibition NyArktis (in Norwegian)
the END

Latest Episodes

John Comaroff: Conflict and (Dis)order Among Tswana in Colonial and Postcolonial South Africa

John Comaroff, one of the world's leading anthropologists, gives a lecture on the Tswana people in Southern Africa in this CAS seminar. Read more about this seminar on the CAS website: https://cas.oslo.no/listen/john-comaroff-conflict-and-dis-order-among-tswana-in-colonial-and-postcolonial-south-africa-article2849-1169.html

67 MIN2017 DEC 8
Comments
John Comaroff: Conflict and (Dis)order Among Tswana in Colonial and Postcolonial South Africa

Forskningsdagene 2017: Dag O. Hessen om naturens verdi.

Under Forskningsdagene 2017 avholdt Senter for grunnforskning (CAS Oslo) forskerstafett, hvor 6 forskere fikk 12 minutter hver til å snakke om forskning og verdier. I dette innslaget snakker biolog Dag O. Hessen om de mangfoldige verdiene av natur. (Grunnet tekniske problemer har vi dessverre ikke opptak av de andre innslagene)

11 MIN2017 OCT 12
Comments
Forskningsdagene 2017: Dag O. Hessen om naturens verdi.

Levi Bryant: a critique of object-oriented philosophy

In the talk “Object and fold: a critique of object-oriented philosophy”, given at Litteraturhuset in Oslo June 9 2017, philosopher Levi R. Bryant talks about the history of speculative realism and object-oriented ontology. He then moves into a brief discussion of Graham Harman’s object-oriented philosophy, and he lays out an alternative vision he would like to propose. Levi R. Bryant is Professor of Philosophy at Collin College, Texas, and author of several books and articles focusing on object-oriented ontology. He has also written extensively about post-structural and cultural theory. His first book Difference and Givenness: Deleuze’s Transcendental Empiricism and the Ontology of Immanence was published in 2008, and is based on his doctoral research. He has since published The Democracry of Objects (2011), and his latest book Onto-Cartography: An Ontology of Machines and Media (2014). He is co-editor of The Speculative Turn together with Nick Srnicek and Graham Harman. In her ...

38 MIN2017 JUN 30
Comments
Levi Bryant: a critique of object-oriented philosophy

Robert Macfarlane: – We are the Generation Anthropocene

– We are Generation Anthropocene, Robert Macfarlane says, but argues that our need for change seems to greatly exceed our capacity to exert it. April 6 2017 writer and scholar Robert Macfarlane gave the talk Deep Time, Thin Place And Thick Speech in the Anthropocene at Litteraturhuset in Oslo. Macfarlane was invited, and the talk was organised by, the CAS research group After Discourse: Things, Archaeology, and Heritage in the 21st Century. Extracts from the "Polar Day" sonification are used by kind permission of its creators, Mark Ballora and Matthew Kenny, using data collected by the paleoclimate scientist David Pollard. http://music.psu.edu/faculty/mark-ballora

54 MIN2017 APR 26
Comments
Robert Macfarlane: – We are the Generation Anthropocene

Glaciers retreat: - The mountain is sad

Glaciers are found on every continent, and they are all changing in the same way: they are retreating, melting. Social anthropologist Professor Ben Orlove calls glaciers “magnificent and extraordinary”, and their retreat a tragedy. We have talked with him about why glaciers are so great, and the central role they play in humans lives all over the world, from energy to religion. Professor Orlove once took part in a pilgrimage in the Peruvian Andes. - I’ve actually heard conversations between some of the pilgrims about whether the mountain is angry or sad, and they pretty much agreed that the mountain is sad: it’s sad about the state of the world. Audio: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen Music: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen/Shutterstock Photo: Shutterstock

22 MIN2016 AUG 31
Comments
Glaciers retreat: - The mountain is sad

What dog skeletons tell us about the long-lasting relationship between humans and dogs

In CAS’ second podcast we talk with CAS-fellow and archaeologist Professor Robert Losey about his research in Siberia on dog skeletons that are thousands of years old, how and why humans and dogs get along so well, and his personal relationship with his dog Guinness. - Dogs and wolves have the capacities for these relationships on a genetic basis, but these early dogs may have initiated associating and living among humans on their own, Professor Losey says. Audio: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen Music: Karoline Kvellestad Isaksen Photo: Robert Losey

22 MIN2016 JUN 15
Comments
What dog skeletons tell us about the long-lasting relationship between humans and dogs

Sense a different Arctic: a guided tour of the exhibition NyArktis (in Norwegian)

In the exhibition NyArktis, CAS researchers challenge portrayals of the Arctic as bare and without human’s presence, and experiment in new ways of presenting the region. In the Centre´s first podcast project leader Gro Ween guides us through the exhibition NyArktis- an exhibition by researchers in the CAS project Artic Domestication in the era of the Anthropocene.

21 MIN2016 JUN 10
Comments
Sense a different Arctic: a guided tour of the exhibition NyArktis (in Norwegian)
the END

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