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Research Horizons

Cambridge University

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Research Horizons

Research Horizons

Cambridge University

2
Followers
0
Plays
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About Us

Welcome to Cambridge University's research collection, where you can find out about some of the research, discoveries and innovations that take place here. Whether you are at Cambridge, thinking about applying, or just curious about what happens at this famous University, this collection gives you a chance to find out something you didn't already know about the world around you!

Latest Episodes

Welcome to dataworld

Carrying out fieldwork in high-security subterranean data centres, Alex Taylor explores fears of technological failure in our data-dependent society. Alex is a PhD student in the Division of Social Anthropology at the University of Cambridge.

15 MIN2017 MAR 31
Comments
Welcome to dataworld

Avian flu viruses which are transmissible between humans could evolve in nature

Research provides insight into feasibility of virus becoming airborne transmissible. It might be possible for human-to-human airborne transmissible avian H5N1 influenza viruses to evolve in nature, new research has found. Currently, avian H5N1 influenza, also known as bird flu, can be transmitted from birds to humans, but not (or only very rarely) from human to human. However, two recent papers by Herfst, Fouchier and colleagues in Science and Imai, Kawaoka and colleagues in Nature reveal that potentially with as few as five mutations (amino acid substitutions), or four mutations plus reassortment, avian H5N1 can become airborne transmissible between mammals, and thus potentially among humans. However, until now, it was not known whether these mutations might evolve in nature. The Cambridge researchers first analysed all of the surveillance data available on avian H5N1 influenza viruses from the last 15 years, focusing on birds and humans. They discovered that two of the five mutati...

19 MIN2015 NOV 12
Comments
Avian flu viruses which are transmissible between humans could evolve in nature

Anti-fraud lasers

An anti-fraud laser detector could be used to identify counterfeit banknotes, pharmaceuticals and luxury goods. The prototype was developed with support from the Cambridge Innovation and Knowledge Centre http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/anti-fraud-lasers-and-inks-for-transparent-electronics

1 MIN2014 JUL 30
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Anti-fraud lasers

Graphene-based ink

Graphene-based electronic ink paves the way for wearable, printed electronics and sensors, such as heart monitors. The prototype in this film was developed with support from the Cambridge Innovation and Knowledge Centre. http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/anti-fraud-lasers-and-inks-for-transparent-electronics

1 MIN2014 JUL 30
Comments
Graphene-based ink

Living with the Inugguit

In 2010, Dr Stephen Leonard embarked on a year-long trip to live with the Inugguit of north-west Greenland, the northernmost settled people on Earth. His aim was to record the language, stories and songs of these communities. The traditional life of the community and its future is potentially threatened by a number of factors, one of which is climate change. Dr Leonard lived as a member of those communities, travelled on hunts, and recorded and filmed as he went. Here he talks about some of his experiences and reflects on a year spent in the midst of a fading culture.

4 MIN2013 APR 17
Comments
Living with the Inugguit

Stephen Leonard Lecture at Trinity Hall

In 2010, Dr Stephen Leonard embarked on a year-long trip to live with the Inughuit of north-west Greenland who live in the northernmost permanently inhabited settlement in the world. His aim was to record the marginal language, stories and songs of these communities - all of which are potentially threatened by a range of factors, one of which is climate change. Dr Leonard lived as a member of those communities, travelled on hunts, and recorded and filmed as he went. Here is lecture he gave at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, in October 2011. Dr Leonard's research was funded by the British Academy and the World Oral Literature Project

54 MIN2011 OCT 14
Comments
Stephen Leonard Lecture at Trinity Hall
the END

Latest Episodes

Welcome to dataworld

Carrying out fieldwork in high-security subterranean data centres, Alex Taylor explores fears of technological failure in our data-dependent society. Alex is a PhD student in the Division of Social Anthropology at the University of Cambridge.

15 MIN2017 MAR 31
Comments
Welcome to dataworld

Avian flu viruses which are transmissible between humans could evolve in nature

Research provides insight into feasibility of virus becoming airborne transmissible. It might be possible for human-to-human airborne transmissible avian H5N1 influenza viruses to evolve in nature, new research has found. Currently, avian H5N1 influenza, also known as bird flu, can be transmitted from birds to humans, but not (or only very rarely) from human to human. However, two recent papers by Herfst, Fouchier and colleagues in Science and Imai, Kawaoka and colleagues in Nature reveal that potentially with as few as five mutations (amino acid substitutions), or four mutations plus reassortment, avian H5N1 can become airborne transmissible between mammals, and thus potentially among humans. However, until now, it was not known whether these mutations might evolve in nature. The Cambridge researchers first analysed all of the surveillance data available on avian H5N1 influenza viruses from the last 15 years, focusing on birds and humans. They discovered that two of the five mutati...

19 MIN2015 NOV 12
Comments
Avian flu viruses which are transmissible between humans could evolve in nature

Anti-fraud lasers

An anti-fraud laser detector could be used to identify counterfeit banknotes, pharmaceuticals and luxury goods. The prototype was developed with support from the Cambridge Innovation and Knowledge Centre http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/anti-fraud-lasers-and-inks-for-transparent-electronics

1 MIN2014 JUL 30
Comments
Anti-fraud lasers

Graphene-based ink

Graphene-based electronic ink paves the way for wearable, printed electronics and sensors, such as heart monitors. The prototype in this film was developed with support from the Cambridge Innovation and Knowledge Centre. http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/anti-fraud-lasers-and-inks-for-transparent-electronics

1 MIN2014 JUL 30
Comments
Graphene-based ink

Living with the Inugguit

In 2010, Dr Stephen Leonard embarked on a year-long trip to live with the Inugguit of north-west Greenland, the northernmost settled people on Earth. His aim was to record the language, stories and songs of these communities. The traditional life of the community and its future is potentially threatened by a number of factors, one of which is climate change. Dr Leonard lived as a member of those communities, travelled on hunts, and recorded and filmed as he went. Here he talks about some of his experiences and reflects on a year spent in the midst of a fading culture.

4 MIN2013 APR 17
Comments
Living with the Inugguit

Stephen Leonard Lecture at Trinity Hall

In 2010, Dr Stephen Leonard embarked on a year-long trip to live with the Inughuit of north-west Greenland who live in the northernmost permanently inhabited settlement in the world. His aim was to record the marginal language, stories and songs of these communities - all of which are potentially threatened by a range of factors, one of which is climate change. Dr Leonard lived as a member of those communities, travelled on hunts, and recorded and filmed as he went. Here is lecture he gave at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, in October 2011. Dr Leonard's research was funded by the British Academy and the World Oral Literature Project

54 MIN2011 OCT 14
Comments
Stephen Leonard Lecture at Trinity Hall
the END
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