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Dig: A History Podcast

Recorded History Podcast Network

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Dig: A History Podcast

Dig: A History Podcast

Recorded History Podcast Network

76
Followers
375
Plays
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About Us

Four women historians, a world of history to unearth. Can you dig it?

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Hey Listeners! We're a history podcast run by four women historians with an explicitly feminist perspective. We run a new 4-episode series every other month - basically four weekly episodes in a row, and then a month off while we research, write, record & edit new episodes. When you join our membership you'll get our episodes ad-free through Himalaya! 


Why subscribe? 


In addition to our ad-free episodes, you'll be part of the exclusive Dig Pod Squad Member Community here on Himalaya, with exclusive access to US! We'll answer your questions about episodes, take Member Community suggestions for future series, and share exclusive content in this platform. Plus, every member will receive our coveted Dig Holiday Card... and you don't want to miss that gem!

The best part? Membership is only $2.99/month. 

Latest Episodes

Sex & Soldiers: Combating Sexually Transmitted Infection in the US Military

Commemorative Sex Series. Episode 4 of 4. Wherever you have a military, you will have sex. Whether it’s an occupied city, an encampment in a theater of war, or a military base here in the United States, anywhere you have a large population of young men, stationed away from their girlfriends and wives, you will soon have a booming sex trade – and the requisite STI outbreak. So how has the United States military dealt with this particular problem facing soldier health? For this episode in our anniversary series on sex, we’re talking about sex, sexually transmitted infections, and the US military. Find transcripts and show notes at: https://digpodcast.org/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

75 MIN20 h ago
Comments
Sex & Soldiers: Combating Sexually Transmitted Infection in the US Military

Steaming the “Nefarious Sin”: Bathhouses and Homosexuality from the Victorian Era to the AIDS Epidemic

ECommemorative Sex Series: Episode 3 of 4. When and where public baths have been popular, they’ve meant different things to different cultures. They might be sites for socializing, religious purification, spiritual/bodily cleanliness, relaxation/pampering, public health/hygiene, homosocialiality, and, of course, sex, or some combination of those things. At the start of the twentieth century, single-gender communal bathhouses were central to emerging gay communities all over North America and Europe. At the end of the century, those sites of community formation were associated with the rapid and devastating spread of HIV/AIDS. In 1984, the city of San Francisco ordered the closure of bathhouses, insisting that often anonymous and unsafe sex was at the heart of the bathhouse. But the closure of the gay bathhouses in AIDS-era America echoes the closure and backlash against queer bathhouse spaces in places like early twentieth-century Russia and Mexico. The bathhouse was a contested space because of its same-sex sexual activity, with or without the threat of the looming pandemic. For a complete transcript and bibliography, visit digpodcast.org Selected Bibliography Allab Berube, My Desire for History ,(University of North Carolina Press, 2011). Ed. by Chris Bull, While the World Sleeps: Writing from the First Twenty Years of the Global AIDS Plague (Thunder’s Mouth Press, 2003). Dan Healy, Russian Homophobia: From Stalin to Sochi, (Bloomsbury Academic, 2017). Victor M. Macias-Gonzalez, Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, (University of New Mexicao, 2012). Ethan Pollock, Without the Banya we Would Perish, (Oxford University Press, 2019). Philip Tiemeyer, Plane Queer: Labor, Sexuality, and AIDS in the History of Male Flight Attendants (University of California Press, 2013). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

63 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Steaming the “Nefarious Sin”: Bathhouses and Homosexuality from the Victorian Era to the AIDS Epidemic

Recogimiento: Virginity, Enclosure, and Female Virtue in Colonial Latin America

Commemorative Sex Series: Episode 2 of 4. Today’s show is focused on the Hispanic concept of recogida and the accompanying system called recogimiento. Roughly translated into English, recogida means “pick up,” or “capture” while the word recogimiento means “recollection,” “seclusion” or “withdrawal” but, as many scholars before us have noted, these Spanish words resist translation. To early modern Spanish-speakers, they evoked a division in the worlds of the sacred and the worldly.To modern Spanish-speakers, they evoke social concepts related to honor and shame. We do know that recogimiento first came into use on the Iberian peninsula by Franciscans and Catholic mystics. Though this usage continued, the term also came to represent a system of virtue for women, one that revolved around sexual purity, honor, and physical enclosure. Eventually, this tradition-turned-social norm evolved into an institution for women with many purposes. Join us as we uncover the long and winding history of recogimiento in colonial Latin America. Find transcripts and show notes at www.digpodcast.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

92 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Recogimiento: Virginity, Enclosure, and Female Virtue in Colonial Latin America

Honeymoon in Niagara Falls: Heterosexuality and Place

ECommemorative Sex Series: Episode 1 of 4. It's our 100th EPISODE!!! Welcome to the start of another glorious SEX series. This episode on the Honeymoon in Niagara Falls is our 100th episode, and to commemorate the occasion, we're returning to one of our favorite Series themes: Sex. Thank you for supporting us, for joining us on this journey, and for listening! Niagara Falls was once known as the Honeymoon Capital of the World. Join us as we explore this unique phenomenon. Everything has a history, even honeymoons. Bibliography Cott, Nancy. Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009. Breines, Wini. “The ‘Other’ Fifties: Beats and Bad Girls,” in Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945-1960. Ed. Joann Meyerowitz. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1994. Dubinsky, Karen. The Second Greatest Disappointment: Honeymooning and Tourism at Niagara Falls. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1999. Howells, William...

56 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Honeymoon in Niagara Falls: Heterosexuality and Place

Three Years DIGGING! Live Recording

EThis is a special episode, a recording of a live Anniversary episode in which we answer questions from listeners. We hope you enjoy! Thank you for listening to and supporting our show, and to those who submitted questions and joined us for the live episode, a special thanks to you all! <3 Next week (May 10) we will be releasing our 100th episode as Dig, kicking off a Sex series like no other. Cheers! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

78 MINMAY 5
Comments
Three Years DIGGING! Live Recording

79 and Counting: Women of Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising

Violence Series #4 of 4. Though they’re rarely at the fore of the story, the women of Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising were essential to the rebellion. They carried messages and supplies, provided cover fire in battles, and served on the front lines. In this episode Averill and Sarah dive into the historical treatment of the women of the Easter Rising, and the failure of the Free State after Ireland gained its independence to adequately honor the sacrifice of those women.Get the transcript and Further Reading recommendations at digpodcast.org Bibliography Mary McAuliffe and Liz Gillis, Richmond Barracks 1916: we were there: 77 women of the Easter Rising, (Dublin City Council, 2016). Edited by Ruán O'Donnell, Mícheál Ó hAodha, Voices from the Easter Rising, (Merrion Press, 2016) Richard Grayson, Dublin's Great Wars : The First World War, the Easter Rising and the Irish Revolution, (Cambridge University Press; 2018) Caoimhe Nic Dháibhéid, “Schooling the National Orphans: The Education of the Children of the Easter Rising Leaders,” The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, 2016, Vol.9(2), pp.261-276 Marian Eide, “Maeve’s Legacy: Constance Markievicz, Eva Gore-Booth, and the Easter Rising,” Éire-Ireland, 2016, Vol.51(3), pp.80-103 Fearghal McGarry, The rising : Ireland--Easter 1916, (Oxford University Press, 2010). Constance Gore Booth Markievicz, Prison Letters of Countess Markievicz (Constance Gore-Booth), Also Poems and Articles Relating to Easter Week by Eva Gore Booth and a Biographical Sketch by Esther Roper, with a Preface by President de Valera, (Longmanns, Green, 1934) Margaret Skinnider, Doing my Bit for Ireland: A first-hand account of the Easter Rising, (Luath Press Ltd, 2017) Margaret Ward, Unmanageable revolutionaries: women and Irish Nationalism, (Pluto Press, 1995) Helen McBride, “Eirebrushed: Erasing Women from Irish History,” Nursing Clio Maria Luddy, “Women and the COntagious Diseases Acts, 1864-1886,” History Ireland (Spring 1993) Brittany Columbus, “Bean na h-Éireann: Feminism and Nationalism in an Irish Journal, 1908-1911,” Voces Novae, vol. 1, iss. 2, (2018) Cal McCarthy, Cumann na mBan and the Irish Revolution, (Cork, Ireland: Collins Press, 2007) Cumann na mBan Archives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

58 MINMAR 30
Comments
79 and Counting: Women of Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising

Blood on the Ravenstone: Judicial Torture, Penal Violence, and Capital Punishment in Early Modern Europe

Violence Series. Episode #3 of 4. This week we're delving into penal violence in early modern Europe. For most people, we suspect, their familiarity with torture, corporal punishment, and execution for capital crime is confined to some gnarly anecdotes, perhaps a few graphic movie scenes, a little Monty Python, and, if you’re cool like us, your high school history project about medieval torture devices. But everything has a history and those things barely scratch the surface. Legal historians have been uncovering, measuring, and analyzing capital punishment for decades and today we want to share some of what they’ve found. Find show notes and transcripts at www.digpodcast.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

78 MINMAR 23
Comments
Blood on the Ravenstone: Judicial Torture, Penal Violence, and Capital Punishment in Early Modern Europe

Honor, Manhood, Slavery: Political Violence from Alexander Hamilton to John Brown

Violence Series, #2 of 4. Dueling seems crazy to us today. Two men take ten paces, turn to face each other, and stand still while they shoot to kill, all the while following strict rules. But while it’s easy to think of duels as simply evidence of a more violent age, dueling and other similar forms of violence offer an important window into the political, racial, and cultural history of the late 18th and early 19th century. Duels weren’t just about shooting at a guy you disliked – they were about masculinity, slavery, race, politics, honor, class status, and the sectional crisis. We're talking about all this in this episode about dueling and political violence in America in the first half of the nineteenth century.Get the full transcript at digpodcast.org Bibliography Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Books, 2004. Earle, Jonathan. John Brown’s Raid on Harper’s Ferry: A Brief History with Documents. Boston: Bedford St. Martins, 2008. Ellis, Joseph. Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. New York: Vintage Books, 2000. Freeman, Joanne B. The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018. Freeman, Joanne B. Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001. Greenberg, Kenneth S. Honor & Slavery: Lies, Duels, Noses, Masks, Dressing as a Woman, Gifts, Strangers, Humanitarianism, Death, Slave Rebellions, The Proslavery Argument, Baseball, Hunting, and Gambling in the Old South. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. Hoffer, Williamjames Hull. The Caning of Charles Sumner: Honor, Idealism, and the Origins of the Civil War. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 2010. Letters from Alexander Hamilton to Aaron Burr, Founders Online, National Archives Online. Charles Sumner, “The Crime Against Kansas” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

58 MINMAR 17
Comments
Honor, Manhood, Slavery: Political Violence from Alexander Hamilton to John Brown

Anti-Mexican Mob Violence in the Borderlands: A Lynching in Rocksprings, Texas

Violence Series. Episode # 1 of 4. Today we are examining violence and lynching towards ethnic Mexican people along the Texas Mexico border during the early twentieth century. Particularly we are discussing the mob violence, or lynching, against Antionio Rodriguez in Rocksprings Texas in November of 1910. Typically when lynching in America is discussed it is in reference to the obscene amount of lynchings against Black people in the United States between Reconstruction and the mid-twentieth century. However, anti-Mexican violence was also a harsh reality of racial violence throughout the American Southwest. Find show notes and transcripts at: www.digpodcast.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

39 MINMAR 9
Comments
Anti-Mexican Mob Violence in the Borderlands: A Lynching in Rocksprings, Texas

Slave, Contraband, Refugee: The Complicated Story of the End of Slavery in the United States

2020 Series #4 of 4. Just over one month after the first shots of the Civil War were fired, three enslaved black men got into a row boat and paddled across the James River from mainland Virginia to the Union-occupied Fortress Monroe. Whether they knew it or not, the three young men – named Frank Baker, Shepard Mallory, and James Townsend – sparked the unraveling of the institution of slavery in the United States. In today’s installment of our ‘do-over’ series, we’re revisiting the complicated legal category of contraband, the term applied to enslaved people who fled to Union lines during the American Civil War. Find transcripts and show notes at: https://digpodcast.org/2020/01/26/slave-contraband-refugee-the-end-of-slavery-in-the-united-states Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

86 MINJAN 27
Comments
Slave, Contraband, Refugee: The Complicated Story of the End of Slavery in the United States

Latest Episodes

Sex & Soldiers: Combating Sexually Transmitted Infection in the US Military

Commemorative Sex Series. Episode 4 of 4. Wherever you have a military, you will have sex. Whether it’s an occupied city, an encampment in a theater of war, or a military base here in the United States, anywhere you have a large population of young men, stationed away from their girlfriends and wives, you will soon have a booming sex trade – and the requisite STI outbreak. So how has the United States military dealt with this particular problem facing soldier health? For this episode in our anniversary series on sex, we’re talking about sex, sexually transmitted infections, and the US military. Find transcripts and show notes at: https://digpodcast.org/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

75 MIN20 h ago
Comments
Sex & Soldiers: Combating Sexually Transmitted Infection in the US Military

Steaming the “Nefarious Sin”: Bathhouses and Homosexuality from the Victorian Era to the AIDS Epidemic

ECommemorative Sex Series: Episode 3 of 4. When and where public baths have been popular, they’ve meant different things to different cultures. They might be sites for socializing, religious purification, spiritual/bodily cleanliness, relaxation/pampering, public health/hygiene, homosocialiality, and, of course, sex, or some combination of those things. At the start of the twentieth century, single-gender communal bathhouses were central to emerging gay communities all over North America and Europe. At the end of the century, those sites of community formation were associated with the rapid and devastating spread of HIV/AIDS. In 1984, the city of San Francisco ordered the closure of bathhouses, insisting that often anonymous and unsafe sex was at the heart of the bathhouse. But the closure of the gay bathhouses in AIDS-era America echoes the closure and backlash against queer bathhouse spaces in places like early twentieth-century Russia and Mexico. The bathhouse was a contested space because of its same-sex sexual activity, with or without the threat of the looming pandemic. For a complete transcript and bibliography, visit digpodcast.org Selected Bibliography Allab Berube, My Desire for History ,(University of North Carolina Press, 2011). Ed. by Chris Bull, While the World Sleeps: Writing from the First Twenty Years of the Global AIDS Plague (Thunder’s Mouth Press, 2003). Dan Healy, Russian Homophobia: From Stalin to Sochi, (Bloomsbury Academic, 2017). Victor M. Macias-Gonzalez, Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, (University of New Mexicao, 2012). Ethan Pollock, Without the Banya we Would Perish, (Oxford University Press, 2019). Philip Tiemeyer, Plane Queer: Labor, Sexuality, and AIDS in the History of Male Flight Attendants (University of California Press, 2013). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

63 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Steaming the “Nefarious Sin”: Bathhouses and Homosexuality from the Victorian Era to the AIDS Epidemic

Recogimiento: Virginity, Enclosure, and Female Virtue in Colonial Latin America

Commemorative Sex Series: Episode 2 of 4. Today’s show is focused on the Hispanic concept of recogida and the accompanying system called recogimiento. Roughly translated into English, recogida means “pick up,” or “capture” while the word recogimiento means “recollection,” “seclusion” or “withdrawal” but, as many scholars before us have noted, these Spanish words resist translation. To early modern Spanish-speakers, they evoked a division in the worlds of the sacred and the worldly.To modern Spanish-speakers, they evoke social concepts related to honor and shame. We do know that recogimiento first came into use on the Iberian peninsula by Franciscans and Catholic mystics. Though this usage continued, the term also came to represent a system of virtue for women, one that revolved around sexual purity, honor, and physical enclosure. Eventually, this tradition-turned-social norm evolved into an institution for women with many purposes. Join us as we uncover the long and winding history of recogimiento in colonial Latin America. Find transcripts and show notes at www.digpodcast.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

92 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Recogimiento: Virginity, Enclosure, and Female Virtue in Colonial Latin America

Honeymoon in Niagara Falls: Heterosexuality and Place

ECommemorative Sex Series: Episode 1 of 4. It's our 100th EPISODE!!! Welcome to the start of another glorious SEX series. This episode on the Honeymoon in Niagara Falls is our 100th episode, and to commemorate the occasion, we're returning to one of our favorite Series themes: Sex. Thank you for supporting us, for joining us on this journey, and for listening! Niagara Falls was once known as the Honeymoon Capital of the World. Join us as we explore this unique phenomenon. Everything has a history, even honeymoons. Bibliography Cott, Nancy. Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009. Breines, Wini. “The ‘Other’ Fifties: Beats and Bad Girls,” in Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945-1960. Ed. Joann Meyerowitz. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1994. Dubinsky, Karen. The Second Greatest Disappointment: Honeymooning and Tourism at Niagara Falls. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1999. Howells, William...

56 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Honeymoon in Niagara Falls: Heterosexuality and Place

Three Years DIGGING! Live Recording

EThis is a special episode, a recording of a live Anniversary episode in which we answer questions from listeners. We hope you enjoy! Thank you for listening to and supporting our show, and to those who submitted questions and joined us for the live episode, a special thanks to you all! <3 Next week (May 10) we will be releasing our 100th episode as Dig, kicking off a Sex series like no other. Cheers! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

78 MINMAY 5
Comments
Three Years DIGGING! Live Recording

79 and Counting: Women of Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising

Violence Series #4 of 4. Though they’re rarely at the fore of the story, the women of Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising were essential to the rebellion. They carried messages and supplies, provided cover fire in battles, and served on the front lines. In this episode Averill and Sarah dive into the historical treatment of the women of the Easter Rising, and the failure of the Free State after Ireland gained its independence to adequately honor the sacrifice of those women.Get the transcript and Further Reading recommendations at digpodcast.org Bibliography Mary McAuliffe and Liz Gillis, Richmond Barracks 1916: we were there: 77 women of the Easter Rising, (Dublin City Council, 2016). Edited by Ruán O'Donnell, Mícheál Ó hAodha, Voices from the Easter Rising, (Merrion Press, 2016) Richard Grayson, Dublin's Great Wars : The First World War, the Easter Rising and the Irish Revolution, (Cambridge University Press; 2018) Caoimhe Nic Dháibhéid, “Schooling the National Orphans: The Education of the Children of the Easter Rising Leaders,” The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, 2016, Vol.9(2), pp.261-276 Marian Eide, “Maeve’s Legacy: Constance Markievicz, Eva Gore-Booth, and the Easter Rising,” Éire-Ireland, 2016, Vol.51(3), pp.80-103 Fearghal McGarry, The rising : Ireland--Easter 1916, (Oxford University Press, 2010). Constance Gore Booth Markievicz, Prison Letters of Countess Markievicz (Constance Gore-Booth), Also Poems and Articles Relating to Easter Week by Eva Gore Booth and a Biographical Sketch by Esther Roper, with a Preface by President de Valera, (Longmanns, Green, 1934) Margaret Skinnider, Doing my Bit for Ireland: A first-hand account of the Easter Rising, (Luath Press Ltd, 2017) Margaret Ward, Unmanageable revolutionaries: women and Irish Nationalism, (Pluto Press, 1995) Helen McBride, “Eirebrushed: Erasing Women from Irish History,” Nursing Clio Maria Luddy, “Women and the COntagious Diseases Acts, 1864-1886,” History Ireland (Spring 1993) Brittany Columbus, “Bean na h-Éireann: Feminism and Nationalism in an Irish Journal, 1908-1911,” Voces Novae, vol. 1, iss. 2, (2018) Cal McCarthy, Cumann na mBan and the Irish Revolution, (Cork, Ireland: Collins Press, 2007) Cumann na mBan Archives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

58 MINMAR 30
Comments
79 and Counting: Women of Ireland’s 1916 Easter Rising

Blood on the Ravenstone: Judicial Torture, Penal Violence, and Capital Punishment in Early Modern Europe

Violence Series. Episode #3 of 4. This week we're delving into penal violence in early modern Europe. For most people, we suspect, their familiarity with torture, corporal punishment, and execution for capital crime is confined to some gnarly anecdotes, perhaps a few graphic movie scenes, a little Monty Python, and, if you’re cool like us, your high school history project about medieval torture devices. But everything has a history and those things barely scratch the surface. Legal historians have been uncovering, measuring, and analyzing capital punishment for decades and today we want to share some of what they’ve found. Find show notes and transcripts at www.digpodcast.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

78 MINMAR 23
Comments
Blood on the Ravenstone: Judicial Torture, Penal Violence, and Capital Punishment in Early Modern Europe

Honor, Manhood, Slavery: Political Violence from Alexander Hamilton to John Brown

Violence Series, #2 of 4. Dueling seems crazy to us today. Two men take ten paces, turn to face each other, and stand still while they shoot to kill, all the while following strict rules. But while it’s easy to think of duels as simply evidence of a more violent age, dueling and other similar forms of violence offer an important window into the political, racial, and cultural history of the late 18th and early 19th century. Duels weren’t just about shooting at a guy you disliked – they were about masculinity, slavery, race, politics, honor, class status, and the sectional crisis. We're talking about all this in this episode about dueling and political violence in America in the first half of the nineteenth century.Get the full transcript at digpodcast.org Bibliography Chernow, Ron. Alexander Hamilton. New York: Penguin Books, 2004. Earle, Jonathan. John Brown’s Raid on Harper’s Ferry: A Brief History with Documents. Boston: Bedford St. Martins, 2008. Ellis, Joseph. Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation. New York: Vintage Books, 2000. Freeman, Joanne B. The Field of Blood: Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2018. Freeman, Joanne B. Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001. Greenberg, Kenneth S. Honor & Slavery: Lies, Duels, Noses, Masks, Dressing as a Woman, Gifts, Strangers, Humanitarianism, Death, Slave Rebellions, The Proslavery Argument, Baseball, Hunting, and Gambling in the Old South. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. Hoffer, Williamjames Hull. The Caning of Charles Sumner: Honor, Idealism, and the Origins of the Civil War. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 2010. Letters from Alexander Hamilton to Aaron Burr, Founders Online, National Archives Online. Charles Sumner, “The Crime Against Kansas” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

58 MINMAR 17
Comments
Honor, Manhood, Slavery: Political Violence from Alexander Hamilton to John Brown

Anti-Mexican Mob Violence in the Borderlands: A Lynching in Rocksprings, Texas

Violence Series. Episode # 1 of 4. Today we are examining violence and lynching towards ethnic Mexican people along the Texas Mexico border during the early twentieth century. Particularly we are discussing the mob violence, or lynching, against Antionio Rodriguez in Rocksprings Texas in November of 1910. Typically when lynching in America is discussed it is in reference to the obscene amount of lynchings against Black people in the United States between Reconstruction and the mid-twentieth century. However, anti-Mexican violence was also a harsh reality of racial violence throughout the American Southwest. Find show notes and transcripts at: www.digpodcast.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

39 MINMAR 9
Comments
Anti-Mexican Mob Violence in the Borderlands: A Lynching in Rocksprings, Texas

Slave, Contraband, Refugee: The Complicated Story of the End of Slavery in the United States

2020 Series #4 of 4. Just over one month after the first shots of the Civil War were fired, three enslaved black men got into a row boat and paddled across the James River from mainland Virginia to the Union-occupied Fortress Monroe. Whether they knew it or not, the three young men – named Frank Baker, Shepard Mallory, and James Townsend – sparked the unraveling of the institution of slavery in the United States. In today’s installment of our ‘do-over’ series, we’re revisiting the complicated legal category of contraband, the term applied to enslaved people who fled to Union lines during the American Civil War. Find transcripts and show notes at: https://digpodcast.org/2020/01/26/slave-contraband-refugee-the-end-of-slavery-in-the-united-states Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

86 MINJAN 27
Comments
Slave, Contraband, Refugee: The Complicated Story of the End of Slavery in the United States
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