Himalaya: Listen. Learn. Grow.

4.8K Ratings
Open In App
title

Early Modern History

The Huntington

9
Followers
64
Plays
Early Modern History

Early Modern History

The Huntington

9
Followers
64
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

The early modern era describes the period in Europe and the Americas between 1450 and 1850. The Huntington collections are particularly strong in Renaissance exploration and cartography, English politics and law in the early modern era, the English aristocracy from the later Middle Ages through the 18th century, and 18th-century British and American military history. The USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute supports advanced research and scholarship on human societies of this era, sponsoring lectures, conferences, workshops, and seminars.

Latest Episodes

Chop Suey, USA: How Americans Discovered Chinese Food

Yong Chen, professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, discusses the historical forces that turned Chinese food, a cuisine once widely rejected by Americans, into one of the most popular ethnic foods in the U.S.

77 min2018 FEB 23
Comments
Chop Suey, USA: How Americans Discovered Chinese Food

Miraculous Things: The Culture of Consumerism in the Renaissance

Martha Howell, professor of history at Columbia University and the R. Stanton Avery Distinguished Fellow, discusses the meaning attached to goods—both humble and luxurious—during the Renaissance. The era is considered by many to be the first age of commercial globalism.

44 min2018 FEB 8
Comments
Miraculous Things: The Culture of Consumerism in the Renaissance

Decoding the Book: Printing & the Birth of Secrecy

Bill Sherman, director of the Warburg Institute in London, delivers the inaugural annual lecture honoring David Zeidberg, recently retired Avery Director of the Library. In his presentation, Sherman traces the modern field of cryptography back to the Renaissance and asks what role the invention of printing played in the keeping of secrets.

54 min2018 JAN 25
Comments
Decoding the Book: Printing & the Birth of Secrecy

Christian Origins in Early Modern Europe: The Birth of a New Kind of History

In the 16th century, the unified Latin Christianity of the Middle Ages broke apart. New Protestant churches and a reformed Catholic church created new theologies, new liturgies, and new ways of imagining what early Christian life and worship were like. Anthony Grafton, professor of history at Princeton University, discusses how the new histories were ideological in inspiration and controversial in style, but nonetheless represented a vital set of innovations in western ways of thinking about and representing the past. This talk is part of the Crotty Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Dec. 7, 2017..

59 min2017 DEC 8
Comments
Christian Origins in Early Modern Europe: The Birth of a New Kind of History

The Florentine Codex and the Herbal Tradition: Unknown versus Known?

The 16th-century ethnographic study known as the Florentine Codex included a richly detailed account of natural history of the New World. In this lecture, Alain Touwaide—historian of medicine, botany, and medicinal plants—compares the Codex and contemporary European herbal traditions. He suggests that they represent the opposition between unknown and known—a dynamic force that led to many discoveries in medicine through the centuries. Recorded Dec. 5, 2017.

59 min2017 DEC 6
Comments
The Florentine Codex and the Herbal Tradition: Unknown versus Known?

Did Early-Modern Schoolmasters Foment Sedition?

Markku Peltonen, professor of history at the University of Helsinki and the Fletcher Jones Foundation Distinguished Fellow, discusses why the famous philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679) placed the blame for the English Civil War and Revolution of the 1640s at the door of schoolmasters. This talk is part of the Distinguished Fellow Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Nov. 15, 2017

49 min2017 NOV 18
Comments
Did Early-Modern Schoolmasters Foment Sedition?

The Lords Proprietors: Land and Power in 17th-Century America

If England’s King Charles II and his courtiers had had their way, most of eastern North America would have been the personal property of about a dozen men who dreamed of wielding virtually absolute power over their vast domains. Daniel K. Richter, professor of history and director of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and the Robert C. Ritchie Distinguished Fellow, explores this neglected chapter in American history and why it still matters. Recorded Nov. 8, 2017.

55 min2017 NOV 9
Comments
The Lords Proprietors: Land and Power in 17th-Century America

The Originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost”

David Loewenstein, Erle Sparks Professor of English and Humanities at Penn State, discusses the daring originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost.” This year marks the 350th anniversary of the great poem’s first publication in 1667. This talk is part of the Ridge Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Nov. 1, 2017.

50 min2017 NOV 2
Comments
The Originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost”

Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca. 1492–1859

Historian Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of the exhibition “Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin,” discusses the surprising and little-known story of the pivotal role that Latin America played in the pursuit of science and art during the first global era. This talk is part of the Wark Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Oct. 16, 2017.

57 min2017 OCT 17
Comments
Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca. 1492–1859

Potosí, Silver, and the Coming of the Modern World

John Demos, Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of History at Yale University and the Ritchie Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, presents an account of Potosí, the great South American silver mine and boomtown that galvanized imperial Spain in the 16th and 17th centuries, fueled the rise of capitalism, destroyed native peoples and cultures en masse, and changed history—for good or ill? This talk is part of the Distinguished Fellow Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded April 12, 2017.

65 min2017 APR 13
Comments
Potosí, Silver, and the Coming of the Modern World

Latest Episodes

Chop Suey, USA: How Americans Discovered Chinese Food

Yong Chen, professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, discusses the historical forces that turned Chinese food, a cuisine once widely rejected by Americans, into one of the most popular ethnic foods in the U.S.

77 min2018 FEB 23
Comments
Chop Suey, USA: How Americans Discovered Chinese Food

Miraculous Things: The Culture of Consumerism in the Renaissance

Martha Howell, professor of history at Columbia University and the R. Stanton Avery Distinguished Fellow, discusses the meaning attached to goods—both humble and luxurious—during the Renaissance. The era is considered by many to be the first age of commercial globalism.

44 min2018 FEB 8
Comments
Miraculous Things: The Culture of Consumerism in the Renaissance

Decoding the Book: Printing & the Birth of Secrecy

Bill Sherman, director of the Warburg Institute in London, delivers the inaugural annual lecture honoring David Zeidberg, recently retired Avery Director of the Library. In his presentation, Sherman traces the modern field of cryptography back to the Renaissance and asks what role the invention of printing played in the keeping of secrets.

54 min2018 JAN 25
Comments
Decoding the Book: Printing & the Birth of Secrecy

Christian Origins in Early Modern Europe: The Birth of a New Kind of History

In the 16th century, the unified Latin Christianity of the Middle Ages broke apart. New Protestant churches and a reformed Catholic church created new theologies, new liturgies, and new ways of imagining what early Christian life and worship were like. Anthony Grafton, professor of history at Princeton University, discusses how the new histories were ideological in inspiration and controversial in style, but nonetheless represented a vital set of innovations in western ways of thinking about and representing the past. This talk is part of the Crotty Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Dec. 7, 2017..

59 min2017 DEC 8
Comments
Christian Origins in Early Modern Europe: The Birth of a New Kind of History

The Florentine Codex and the Herbal Tradition: Unknown versus Known?

The 16th-century ethnographic study known as the Florentine Codex included a richly detailed account of natural history of the New World. In this lecture, Alain Touwaide—historian of medicine, botany, and medicinal plants—compares the Codex and contemporary European herbal traditions. He suggests that they represent the opposition between unknown and known—a dynamic force that led to many discoveries in medicine through the centuries. Recorded Dec. 5, 2017.

59 min2017 DEC 6
Comments
The Florentine Codex and the Herbal Tradition: Unknown versus Known?

Did Early-Modern Schoolmasters Foment Sedition?

Markku Peltonen, professor of history at the University of Helsinki and the Fletcher Jones Foundation Distinguished Fellow, discusses why the famous philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679) placed the blame for the English Civil War and Revolution of the 1640s at the door of schoolmasters. This talk is part of the Distinguished Fellow Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Nov. 15, 2017

49 min2017 NOV 18
Comments
Did Early-Modern Schoolmasters Foment Sedition?

The Lords Proprietors: Land and Power in 17th-Century America

If England’s King Charles II and his courtiers had had their way, most of eastern North America would have been the personal property of about a dozen men who dreamed of wielding virtually absolute power over their vast domains. Daniel K. Richter, professor of history and director of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania and the Robert C. Ritchie Distinguished Fellow, explores this neglected chapter in American history and why it still matters. Recorded Nov. 8, 2017.

55 min2017 NOV 9
Comments
The Lords Proprietors: Land and Power in 17th-Century America

The Originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost”

David Loewenstein, Erle Sparks Professor of English and Humanities at Penn State, discusses the daring originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost.” This year marks the 350th anniversary of the great poem’s first publication in 1667. This talk is part of the Ridge Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Nov. 1, 2017.

50 min2017 NOV 2
Comments
The Originality of Milton’s “Paradise Lost”

Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca. 1492–1859

Historian Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of the exhibition “Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin,” discusses the surprising and little-known story of the pivotal role that Latin America played in the pursuit of science and art during the first global era. This talk is part of the Wark Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Oct. 16, 2017.

57 min2017 OCT 17
Comments
Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca. 1492–1859

Potosí, Silver, and the Coming of the Modern World

John Demos, Samuel Knight Professor Emeritus of History at Yale University and the Ritchie Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, presents an account of Potosí, the great South American silver mine and boomtown that galvanized imperial Spain in the 16th and 17th centuries, fueled the rise of capitalism, destroyed native peoples and cultures en masse, and changed history—for good or ill? This talk is part of the Distinguished Fellow Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded April 12, 2017.

65 min2017 APR 13
Comments
Potosí, Silver, and the Coming of the Modern World
success toast
Welcome to Himalaya LearningClick below to download our app for better listening experience.Download App