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History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The Huntington

4
Followers
3
Plays
History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The Huntington

4
Followers
3
Plays
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About Us

With the 2006 acquisition of the Burndy Library (a collection of nearly 70,000 items), The Huntington became one the top institutions in the world for the study of the history of science and technology. In November 2008, The Huntington opened Dibner Hall of the History of Science, which features the permanent exhibition “Beautiful Science: Ideas that Change the World.” It includes galleries devoted to astronomy, natural history, medicine, and light. In lectures and interviews, curators and scholars explore a variety of subjects in the history of science.

Latest Episodes

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star: Now I See You As You Are

Jennifer van Saders, Carnegie-Princeton Fellow, will discuss how the technique of astroseismology has revolutionized scientists’ view of the internal workings of stars. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded May 15, 2017.

35 MIN2017 MAY 16
Comments
Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star: Now I See You As You Are

Exoplanet Genetics

Dr. Johanna Teske, Carnegie Origins Postdoctoral Fellow, highlights new discoveries about exoplanets—planets orbiting stars other than our Sun—including how their composition is “inherited” from their host star. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded May 1, 2017.

63 MIN2017 MAY 2
Comments
Exoplanet Genetics

Unraveling the Mysteries of Exploding Stars

Tony Piro, the George Ellery Hale Distinguished Scholar in Theoretical Astrophysics at the Carnegie Observatories, discusses how scientists are combining observations with theoretical modeling to unravel the mysteries of supernovae. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded April 3, 2017.

52 MIN2017 APR 4
Comments
Unraveling the Mysteries of Exploding Stars

Simulating the Universe, One Galaxy at a Time

Andrew Wetzel, Caltech-Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories, discusses how theoretical astrophysics is now revealing how galaxies are formed, using the world’s most powerful supercomputers to simulate this complex process. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded April 17, 2017.

45 MIN2017 APR 4
Comments
Simulating the Universe, One Galaxy at a Time

PBS’s “Mercy Street” and Medical Histories of the Civil War

The Huntington presents a fascinating conversation about the practice of medicine during the U.S. Civil War and its dramatization in the popular PBS series “Mercy Street.” The panel discussion is moderated by Melissa Lo, Dibner Assistant Curator or Science and Technology at The Huntington, and includes curator Olga Tsapina, who oversees The Huntington’s Civil War collections; series executive producers Lisa Wolfinger and David Zabel; and series medical history advisor Shauna Devine. Recorded Jan. 17, 2017.

74 MIN2017 JAN 18
Comments
PBS’s “Mercy Street” and Medical Histories of the Civil War

The Value of Patents: A Historian’s Perspective

Naomi R. Lamoreaux, Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History at Yale University, discusses the important ways in which patents have contributed to technological innovation over the course of U.S. history. This talk is part of the Haaga Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Jan. 9, 2017.

63 MIN2017 JAN 10
Comments
The Value of Patents: A Historian’s Perspective

Aerospace in Southern California

The history of the aerospace industry in Southern California and its intersections with contemporary culture are the focus of this panel discussion, presented in conjunction with the exhibition of NASA’s Orbit Pavilion (on view at The Huntington from Oct. 29, 2016, to Feb. 27, 2017). Panelists are Peter Westwick, aerospace historian; William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West; and Daniel Lewis, senior curator of the history of science and technology at The Huntington. Recorded Dec. 13, 2016.

63 MIN2016 DEC 14
Comments
Aerospace in Southern California

The Cutter Incident

Neal Nathanson M.D., discusses a 1955 incident in which Cutter Laboratories of Berkeley, Calif., inadvertently released batches of polio vaccine that contained the live virus. Nathanson, who headed the unit of the Epidemic Intelligence Service that investigated cases of polio resulting from the Cutter vaccine, also provides an update on efforts toward global eradication of poliomyelitis. This program is presented by the George Dock Society for the History of Medicine. Recorded Nov. 1, 2016.

48 MIN2016 NOV 3
Comments
The Cutter Incident

The Secret Lives of Galaxies

Astronomer Katherine Alatalo will tour the Hubble sequence, from "young" to "old" galaxies, exploring three avenues to galactic transitions: the quiet, slow fade; the violent merger; and the quietly violent evolution of a galaxy, likely due to a supermassive black hole in its center. This talk is part of the Carnegie Lecture series.

45 MIN2016 MAY 17
Comments
The Secret Lives of Galaxies

Physics and “Belles Lettres”: The Arts & the Sciences in the Industrial Revolution

Jon Mee, professor of 18th-century studies at the University of York and the R. Stanton Avery Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the network of literary and philosophical societies that sprang up in response to the transformative experience of the industrial revolution in the north of England between 1780 and 1830. Recorded Sept. 21, 2016.

65 MIN2016 MAY 17
Comments
Physics and “Belles Lettres”: The Arts & the Sciences in the Industrial Revolution

Latest Episodes

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star: Now I See You As You Are

Jennifer van Saders, Carnegie-Princeton Fellow, will discuss how the technique of astroseismology has revolutionized scientists’ view of the internal workings of stars. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded May 15, 2017.

35 MIN2017 MAY 16
Comments
Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star: Now I See You As You Are

Exoplanet Genetics

Dr. Johanna Teske, Carnegie Origins Postdoctoral Fellow, highlights new discoveries about exoplanets—planets orbiting stars other than our Sun—including how their composition is “inherited” from their host star. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded May 1, 2017.

63 MIN2017 MAY 2
Comments
Exoplanet Genetics

Unraveling the Mysteries of Exploding Stars

Tony Piro, the George Ellery Hale Distinguished Scholar in Theoretical Astrophysics at the Carnegie Observatories, discusses how scientists are combining observations with theoretical modeling to unravel the mysteries of supernovae. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded April 3, 2017.

52 MIN2017 APR 4
Comments
Unraveling the Mysteries of Exploding Stars

Simulating the Universe, One Galaxy at a Time

Andrew Wetzel, Caltech-Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories, discusses how theoretical astrophysics is now revealing how galaxies are formed, using the world’s most powerful supercomputers to simulate this complex process. This talk is part of the Carnegie Astronomy Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded April 17, 2017.

45 MIN2017 APR 4
Comments
Simulating the Universe, One Galaxy at a Time

PBS’s “Mercy Street” and Medical Histories of the Civil War

The Huntington presents a fascinating conversation about the practice of medicine during the U.S. Civil War and its dramatization in the popular PBS series “Mercy Street.” The panel discussion is moderated by Melissa Lo, Dibner Assistant Curator or Science and Technology at The Huntington, and includes curator Olga Tsapina, who oversees The Huntington’s Civil War collections; series executive producers Lisa Wolfinger and David Zabel; and series medical history advisor Shauna Devine. Recorded Jan. 17, 2017.

74 MIN2017 JAN 18
Comments
PBS’s “Mercy Street” and Medical Histories of the Civil War

The Value of Patents: A Historian’s Perspective

Naomi R. Lamoreaux, Stanley B. Resor Professor of Economics and History at Yale University, discusses the important ways in which patents have contributed to technological innovation over the course of U.S. history. This talk is part of the Haaga Lecture Series at The Huntington. Recorded Jan. 9, 2017.

63 MIN2017 JAN 10
Comments
The Value of Patents: A Historian’s Perspective

Aerospace in Southern California

The history of the aerospace industry in Southern California and its intersections with contemporary culture are the focus of this panel discussion, presented in conjunction with the exhibition of NASA’s Orbit Pavilion (on view at The Huntington from Oct. 29, 2016, to Feb. 27, 2017). Panelists are Peter Westwick, aerospace historian; William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West; and Daniel Lewis, senior curator of the history of science and technology at The Huntington. Recorded Dec. 13, 2016.

63 MIN2016 DEC 14
Comments
Aerospace in Southern California

The Cutter Incident

Neal Nathanson M.D., discusses a 1955 incident in which Cutter Laboratories of Berkeley, Calif., inadvertently released batches of polio vaccine that contained the live virus. Nathanson, who headed the unit of the Epidemic Intelligence Service that investigated cases of polio resulting from the Cutter vaccine, also provides an update on efforts toward global eradication of poliomyelitis. This program is presented by the George Dock Society for the History of Medicine. Recorded Nov. 1, 2016.

48 MIN2016 NOV 3
Comments
The Cutter Incident

The Secret Lives of Galaxies

Astronomer Katherine Alatalo will tour the Hubble sequence, from "young" to "old" galaxies, exploring three avenues to galactic transitions: the quiet, slow fade; the violent merger; and the quietly violent evolution of a galaxy, likely due to a supermassive black hole in its center. This talk is part of the Carnegie Lecture series.

45 MIN2016 MAY 17
Comments
The Secret Lives of Galaxies

Physics and “Belles Lettres”: The Arts & the Sciences in the Industrial Revolution

Jon Mee, professor of 18th-century studies at the University of York and the R. Stanton Avery Distinguished Fellow at The Huntington, discusses the network of literary and philosophical societies that sprang up in response to the transformative experience of the industrial revolution in the north of England between 1780 and 1830. Recorded Sept. 21, 2016.

65 MIN2016 MAY 17
Comments
Physics and “Belles Lettres”: The Arts & the Sciences in the Industrial Revolution
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