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Life Story with Noah Chrysler

Noah Chrysler

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Life Story with Noah Chrysler
112 min2020 SEP 24
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This is Meredith! I met Meredith in college when we starred in an experimental student film together. We played a 1950’s married couple. It was a very weird film. Meredith was born and raised in Kenesaw, GA. Meredith recently contacted her elementary school to receive her report cards from when she was a kid. Her teachers wrote that she was “very sweet, but distracted” as a kid. Meredith went to a christain prep school until she was in the 8th grade. She remembers her home life being very conservative, and she was always jealous of her friends that seemed to have tight-knit families. Meredith says she often felt like “the weird girl” and that she always wanted to be popular. As a kid she would play soccer, do theater, sing, and dance. In middle school Meredith remembers writing a boy a poem and putting it in his locker. When she returned the next day there was a group crowded around the locker taking turns reading her poem and laughing. She didn’t love that. Meredith was always friends with people older than her. When those friends went off to college, Meredith remembers feeling like an outcast. When Meredith entered highschool she experienced severe culture shock going from private school to public school. She absolutely loved being apart of color guard. Meredith remembers being in a relationship so toxic that she wasn’t allowed to say the word “sneakers.” Meredith took ASL in highschool. Her background in acting and theater made her a natural at ASL, which ultimately led her to go to the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at RIT. While she was at RIT, Meredith began to reassess her values. She discovered that a lot of what she thought and believed was a product of her upbringing. For the first time Meredith began to decide her own values. Currently Meredith lives in Kennesaw, GA and teaches preschool online for deaf children. We talked a lot about the unique challenges that come with that role. Meredith’s final piece of advice was to “stop apologizing. Stop shrinking yourself to fit the mold of somebody else.” It was great sitting down with her.