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Maine Historical Society - Programs Podcast

Maine Historical Society

2
Followers
15
Plays
Maine Historical Society - Programs Podcast

Maine Historical Society - Programs Podcast

Maine Historical Society

2
Followers
15
Plays
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Listen to recordings of lectures, book talks, panels, and other programs on Maine, New England, American history from Maine Historical Society. These podcasts allow everyone to enjoy, learn from, and reflect on history and its relevance today.

Latest Episodes

Wabanaki Place: Language and Landscape

Recorded November 16, 2019 - Listen to historian James E. Francis Sr. (Penobscot) who shared stories about the origin and meaning of geographic place names in what is now known as Maine, from a Wabanaki perspective. Wabanaki, part of the Algonkian language group, is the first language of Maine, and each tribe has a distinct language that expresses worldview. The original words of this land â Casco, Katahdin, Kennebec, Androscoggin, Pemaquid â surround us. As settlers colonized Maine with a dominant English language system, they named towns after their founding fathers or English homelands, resulting in a situation where Wabanaki people are now living in a deeply familiar place populated with foreign words.

80 MIN2019 NOV 19
Comments
Wabanaki Place: Language and Landscape

The Insurgent Delegate - book launch

Recorded November 7, 2019 - Listen to editor William C. "Chuck" diGiacomantonio as discuss a fascinating book that features a selection of letters, writings, and remarkable anti-slavery speeches by George Thatcher (1754-1824). Many of the letters are drawn from Maine Historical Society's manuscript collections. Copies of the book are available for purchase in our Museum Store. George Thatcher served as a U.S. representative from the Maine District of Massachusetts throughout the Federalist Era (1789-1801) which was the most critical and formative period of American constitutional history. A moderate on most political issues, he was a maverick in matters relating to education, the expansion of the slave interest, the rise of Unitarianism, and the separation of church and state. Following Thatcher's journey as a New England Federalist, abolitionist, religious dissenter, and pedagogical innovator can add depth to our understanding of the early American Republic. Written over his 40-year career as a country lawyer, national legislator, and state supreme court justice, selections in The Insurgent Delegate serve as an encyclopedic resource on the Founding Generation as it was lived and experienced in Maine, Boston, and the three capitals where Thatcher served (New York City, Philadelphia, and Washington D.C.). Historians, lawyers, legal scholars, teachers, and genealogists will find this book compelling, as will all readers who are captivated by the dramatic immediacy and authenticity of Thatcher's personal letters. About the Author: William C. diGiacomantonio, Chief Historian of the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, spent most of his career on the editorial team that recently completed the twenty-two-volume Documentary History of the First Federal Congress.

53 MIN2019 NOV 12
Comments
The Insurgent Delegate - book launch

The Role & Purpose of Historical Commemoration in the 21st Century

Recorded October 2, 2019 - There's something irresistible about an anniversary. Maine's Bicentennial, the Centennial of women's suffrage, the upcoming 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence -- all invite public commemoration. But what are we doing when we mark these anniversaries? Celebrating our past? Interrogating it? Something else entirely? Listen to National Endowment for the Humanities Chairman Jon Parrish Peede, on the purpose of historical commemoration in our current age. Presented in partnership by the Maine Humanities Council, Maine Suffrage Centennial, and Maine Historical Society.

52 MIN2019 OCT 4
Comments
The Role & Purpose of Historical Commemoration in the 21st Century

Talk & Pop-Up Exhibition: Capt. William G. Kair and The Scandinavians of Maine

Recorded July 26, 2019 - A gift to MHS, donated through the Grime family descendants of Capt. William G. Kair (Kjar) and his wife Rebecca Orde, offers a glimpse of Scandinavian families new to Maine during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The Kair gift includes a sublime painting by Portland artist George M. Hathaway of The Bark Alice , Capt. Kair's vessel. Created by one of Maine's foremost marine artists, the painting speaks to both her Danish-born captain and his family life in Portland. The Kair collection is one of many fine examples of Scandinavian heritage within the MHS collections. This talk by MHS Research Historian William Barry featured exhibited highlights within a companion mini-exhibit "Recreating Hygge: Scandinavians in the Pine Tree State."

42 MIN2019 JUL 30
Comments
Talk & Pop-Up Exhibition: Capt. William G. Kair and The Scandinavians of Maine

Precious and Adored: The Love Letters of Rose Cleveland and Evangeline Simpson Whipple

Tilly Laskey;Recorded May 16, 2019 - Listen to Tilly Laskey for a fascinating talk of her book PRECIOUS AND ADORED: The Love Letters of Rose Cleveland and Evangeline Simpson Whipple, 1890â1918. Co-edited with Lizzie Ehrenhalt, with a Foreword by Lillian Faderman, the book presents captivating letters, published in their entirety, that document nearly 30 years of love between two women of the Gilded Age. In 1890, Rose Cleveland, sister of President Grover Cleveland, began writing to Evangeline Simpson, a wealthy widow who would become the second wife of Henry Whipple, Minnesota's Episcopal bishop. The women corresponded across states and continents, discussing their advocacy and humanitarian workâand demonstrating their sexual attraction, romance, and partnership. In 1910, after Evangeline Whipple was again widowed, the two women sailed to Italy and began a life together. After Rose Cleveland's death, Evangeline Whipple described her as "my precious and adored life-long friend." This collection, rare in its portrayal of nineteenth-century LGBTQ history, brings their poignant story back to life.

42 MIN2019 JUN 11
Comments
Precious and Adored: The Love Letters of Rose Cleveland and Evangeline Simpson Whipple

Involuntary Americans: Scottish Prisoners in Early Colonial Maine

Carol Gardner;Recorded May 23, 2019 - Author Carol Gardner will discussed the lives of some of Maine's earliest European settlers: prisoners of war who were sent to Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts against their wills, in 1650 to 1651. As forced laborers and later, as free men, these soldiers left their marks on early New England society, and evidence of their existence is with us today. Dr. Gardner's latest historical narrative, THE INVOLUNTARY AMERICAN: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World , chronicles the life and times of Scottish foot soldier Thomas Doughty. Captured at the Battle of Dunbar, Doughty was shipped to Boston, sold to a Puritan industrialist in New Hampshire, and eventually established his own milling operation on the Saco River in Maine.

51 MIN2019 JUN 4
Comments
Involuntary Americans: Scottish Prisoners in Early Colonial Maine

The Land that Sustains Us: Stories from the Field

with Maine Farmland Trust;Recorded November 15, 2018 - No matter how many seasons they have been with their soil, farmers develop a strong connection with their land. For each farmer, this relationship is unique and therefore, manifests differently into the food we eat and the communities we live in. Maine Farmland Trust hosted three farmers for a live storytelling night at the Maine Historical Society to explore these relationships.

55 MIN2018 NOV 18
Comments
The Land that Sustains Us: Stories from the Field

Child Hunger in Maine: Moving Towards a Solution

Recorded September 13, 2018 - In conjunction with MHS's yearlong Maine Eats exhibition and in recognition of National Hunger Awareness month, we are pleased to partner with Full Plates Full Potential to present a forum exploring pathways out of Maine's unsavory history of childhood food insecurity. The discussion was moderated by MHS's Executive Director, Steve Bromage and panelists included Jean LaPointe, School Food Service Director for RSU 10, David Turin, Chef at David's Restaurant and hunger advocate, Mike Norton, Director of Community Relations at Hannaford and Justin Alfond, Former President of the Maine State Senate and Co-Founder of Full Plates Full Potential.

68 MIN2018 SEP 18
Comments
Child Hunger in Maine: Moving Towards a Solution

Book Talk: Maine Roads to Gettysburg

Tom Huntington;Recorded July 12, 2018 - The story of Colonel Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry on Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg has entered into legend. But there's much more to Maine at Gettysburg than that one regiment. The state's soldiers made their presence felt all over the Pennsylvania battlefield during three days of fighting in July 1863âand during the two years of war before that. In a talk about his book, Maine Roads to Gettysburg , author Tom Huntington tells stories about soldiers from the Pine Tree State who made their presence felt during the Civil War's biggest battle.

59 MIN2018 JUL 17
Comments
Book Talk: Maine Roads to Gettysburg

Book Talk: Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip's War by Lisa Brooks

Lisa Brooks;Recorded March 22, 2018 - In Our Beloved Kin , Lisa Brooks recovers a complex picture of war, captivity, and Native resistance during the "First Indian War" (later named King Philip's War) by relaying the stories of Weetamoo, a female Wampanoag leader, and James Printer, a Nipmuc scholar, whose stories converge in the captivity of Mary Rowlandson. Through both a narrow focus on Weetamoo, Printer, and their network of relations, and a far broader scope that includes vast Indigenous geographies, Brooks leads us to a new understanding of the history of colonial New England and of American origins. Brooksâs pathbreaking scholarship is grounded not just in extensive archival research but also in the land and communities of Native New England, reading the actions of actors during the seventeenth century alongside an analysis of the landscape and interpretations informed by tribal history.

50 MIN2018 MAR 27
Comments
Book Talk: Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip's War by Lisa Brooks

Latest Episodes

Wabanaki Place: Language and Landscape

Recorded November 16, 2019 - Listen to historian James E. Francis Sr. (Penobscot) who shared stories about the origin and meaning of geographic place names in what is now known as Maine, from a Wabanaki perspective. Wabanaki, part of the Algonkian language group, is the first language of Maine, and each tribe has a distinct language that expresses worldview. The original words of this land â Casco, Katahdin, Kennebec, Androscoggin, Pemaquid â surround us. As settlers colonized Maine with a dominant English language system, they named towns after their founding fathers or English homelands, resulting in a situation where Wabanaki people are now living in a deeply familiar place populated with foreign words.

80 MIN2019 NOV 19
Comments
Wabanaki Place: Language and Landscape

The Insurgent Delegate - book launch

Recorded November 7, 2019 - Listen to editor William C. "Chuck" diGiacomantonio as discuss a fascinating book that features a selection of letters, writings, and remarkable anti-slavery speeches by George Thatcher (1754-1824). Many of the letters are drawn from Maine Historical Society's manuscript collections. Copies of the book are available for purchase in our Museum Store. George Thatcher served as a U.S. representative from the Maine District of Massachusetts throughout the Federalist Era (1789-1801) which was the most critical and formative period of American constitutional history. A moderate on most political issues, he was a maverick in matters relating to education, the expansion of the slave interest, the rise of Unitarianism, and the separation of church and state. Following Thatcher's journey as a New England Federalist, abolitionist, religious dissenter, and pedagogical innovator can add depth to our understanding of the early American Republic. Written over his 40-year career as a country lawyer, national legislator, and state supreme court justice, selections in The Insurgent Delegate serve as an encyclopedic resource on the Founding Generation as it was lived and experienced in Maine, Boston, and the three capitals where Thatcher served (New York City, Philadelphia, and Washington D.C.). Historians, lawyers, legal scholars, teachers, and genealogists will find this book compelling, as will all readers who are captivated by the dramatic immediacy and authenticity of Thatcher's personal letters. About the Author: William C. diGiacomantonio, Chief Historian of the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, spent most of his career on the editorial team that recently completed the twenty-two-volume Documentary History of the First Federal Congress.

53 MIN2019 NOV 12
Comments
The Insurgent Delegate - book launch

The Role & Purpose of Historical Commemoration in the 21st Century

Recorded October 2, 2019 - There's something irresistible about an anniversary. Maine's Bicentennial, the Centennial of women's suffrage, the upcoming 250th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence -- all invite public commemoration. But what are we doing when we mark these anniversaries? Celebrating our past? Interrogating it? Something else entirely? Listen to National Endowment for the Humanities Chairman Jon Parrish Peede, on the purpose of historical commemoration in our current age. Presented in partnership by the Maine Humanities Council, Maine Suffrage Centennial, and Maine Historical Society.

52 MIN2019 OCT 4
Comments
The Role & Purpose of Historical Commemoration in the 21st Century

Talk & Pop-Up Exhibition: Capt. William G. Kair and The Scandinavians of Maine

Recorded July 26, 2019 - A gift to MHS, donated through the Grime family descendants of Capt. William G. Kair (Kjar) and his wife Rebecca Orde, offers a glimpse of Scandinavian families new to Maine during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The Kair gift includes a sublime painting by Portland artist George M. Hathaway of The Bark Alice , Capt. Kair's vessel. Created by one of Maine's foremost marine artists, the painting speaks to both her Danish-born captain and his family life in Portland. The Kair collection is one of many fine examples of Scandinavian heritage within the MHS collections. This talk by MHS Research Historian William Barry featured exhibited highlights within a companion mini-exhibit "Recreating Hygge: Scandinavians in the Pine Tree State."

42 MIN2019 JUL 30
Comments
Talk & Pop-Up Exhibition: Capt. William G. Kair and The Scandinavians of Maine

Precious and Adored: The Love Letters of Rose Cleveland and Evangeline Simpson Whipple

Tilly Laskey;Recorded May 16, 2019 - Listen to Tilly Laskey for a fascinating talk of her book PRECIOUS AND ADORED: The Love Letters of Rose Cleveland and Evangeline Simpson Whipple, 1890â1918. Co-edited with Lizzie Ehrenhalt, with a Foreword by Lillian Faderman, the book presents captivating letters, published in their entirety, that document nearly 30 years of love between two women of the Gilded Age. In 1890, Rose Cleveland, sister of President Grover Cleveland, began writing to Evangeline Simpson, a wealthy widow who would become the second wife of Henry Whipple, Minnesota's Episcopal bishop. The women corresponded across states and continents, discussing their advocacy and humanitarian workâand demonstrating their sexual attraction, romance, and partnership. In 1910, after Evangeline Whipple was again widowed, the two women sailed to Italy and began a life together. After Rose Cleveland's death, Evangeline Whipple described her as "my precious and adored life-long friend." This collection, rare in its portrayal of nineteenth-century LGBTQ history, brings their poignant story back to life.

42 MIN2019 JUN 11
Comments
Precious and Adored: The Love Letters of Rose Cleveland and Evangeline Simpson Whipple

Involuntary Americans: Scottish Prisoners in Early Colonial Maine

Carol Gardner;Recorded May 23, 2019 - Author Carol Gardner will discussed the lives of some of Maine's earliest European settlers: prisoners of war who were sent to Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts against their wills, in 1650 to 1651. As forced laborers and later, as free men, these soldiers left their marks on early New England society, and evidence of their existence is with us today. Dr. Gardner's latest historical narrative, THE INVOLUNTARY AMERICAN: A Scottish Prisoner's Journey to the New World , chronicles the life and times of Scottish foot soldier Thomas Doughty. Captured at the Battle of Dunbar, Doughty was shipped to Boston, sold to a Puritan industrialist in New Hampshire, and eventually established his own milling operation on the Saco River in Maine.

51 MIN2019 JUN 4
Comments
Involuntary Americans: Scottish Prisoners in Early Colonial Maine

The Land that Sustains Us: Stories from the Field

with Maine Farmland Trust;Recorded November 15, 2018 - No matter how many seasons they have been with their soil, farmers develop a strong connection with their land. For each farmer, this relationship is unique and therefore, manifests differently into the food we eat and the communities we live in. Maine Farmland Trust hosted three farmers for a live storytelling night at the Maine Historical Society to explore these relationships.

55 MIN2018 NOV 18
Comments
The Land that Sustains Us: Stories from the Field

Child Hunger in Maine: Moving Towards a Solution

Recorded September 13, 2018 - In conjunction with MHS's yearlong Maine Eats exhibition and in recognition of National Hunger Awareness month, we are pleased to partner with Full Plates Full Potential to present a forum exploring pathways out of Maine's unsavory history of childhood food insecurity. The discussion was moderated by MHS's Executive Director, Steve Bromage and panelists included Jean LaPointe, School Food Service Director for RSU 10, David Turin, Chef at David's Restaurant and hunger advocate, Mike Norton, Director of Community Relations at Hannaford and Justin Alfond, Former President of the Maine State Senate and Co-Founder of Full Plates Full Potential.

68 MIN2018 SEP 18
Comments
Child Hunger in Maine: Moving Towards a Solution

Book Talk: Maine Roads to Gettysburg

Tom Huntington;Recorded July 12, 2018 - The story of Colonel Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry on Little Round Top during the Battle of Gettysburg has entered into legend. But there's much more to Maine at Gettysburg than that one regiment. The state's soldiers made their presence felt all over the Pennsylvania battlefield during three days of fighting in July 1863âand during the two years of war before that. In a talk about his book, Maine Roads to Gettysburg , author Tom Huntington tells stories about soldiers from the Pine Tree State who made their presence felt during the Civil War's biggest battle.

59 MIN2018 JUL 17
Comments
Book Talk: Maine Roads to Gettysburg

Book Talk: Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip's War by Lisa Brooks

Lisa Brooks;Recorded March 22, 2018 - In Our Beloved Kin , Lisa Brooks recovers a complex picture of war, captivity, and Native resistance during the "First Indian War" (later named King Philip's War) by relaying the stories of Weetamoo, a female Wampanoag leader, and James Printer, a Nipmuc scholar, whose stories converge in the captivity of Mary Rowlandson. Through both a narrow focus on Weetamoo, Printer, and their network of relations, and a far broader scope that includes vast Indigenous geographies, Brooks leads us to a new understanding of the history of colonial New England and of American origins. Brooksâs pathbreaking scholarship is grounded not just in extensive archival research but also in the land and communities of Native New England, reading the actions of actors during the seventeenth century alongside an analysis of the landscape and interpretations informed by tribal history.

50 MIN2018 MAR 27
Comments
Book Talk: Our Beloved Kin: A New History of King Philip's War by Lisa Brooks
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