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Phantom Power

Mack Hagood

4
Followers
39
Plays
Phantom Power

Phantom Power

Mack Hagood

4
Followers
39
Plays
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A podcast on sound art, sound studies, and the sonic humanities

Latest Episodes

Ep. 20: What is Radio Art (Colin Black)

What is radio art? It’s a rather unfamiliar term in the United States, but in other countries, it’s a something of an artistic tradition. Today’s guest,Dr. Colin Black is an internationally acclaimed and award-winning radio artist and composer. He speaks to us about his practice as a radio artist and the influence the Australian radio programThe Listening Roomhad on Australia’s sonic avant garde. We then listen to his pieceOut Of Thin Air: Radio Art Essay #1, which both explores and exemplifies the possibilities of radio art. It’s both informative and a total treat for the ears! The piece was originally commissioned by the Dreamlands commissions for Radio Arts, funded by the Arts Council England and Kent County Council. Out Of Thin Air: Radio Art Essay #1is a meta-referencing poetic reflection and meditation onradio art underpinned by an artistic treatment of dislocation, transmission, reception and placeas a thematic underscore. The work is in the form of an abstract song cycle that chieflyoscillates between “songs” originating from High Frequency (HR) radio static/broadcastsbetween 3 and 30 MHz and those from interviewees replying to questions relating to radio art.Location recordings, sound effect and musical composition weave this originating materialtogether to form a sonic confluence and juxtaposition of elements to stimulate the listener’simagination while offering an insight into the work’s subject matter. Interviewees (in order of appearance): Armeno Alberts, Tom Roe, Jean-Philippe Renoult,Gregory Whitehead, Götz Naleppa, Andrew McLennan, Elisabeth Zimmermann, HeidiGrundmann, Andreas Hagelüken, Teri Rueb and Kaye Mortley Producer and Composer: Colin Black High Frequency (HR) radio receiver operator: Dimitri Papagianakis Duration: 00:25:10 Music for this episode is by Blue the Fifth.We also hear a brief excerpt ofThings Change,Things Stay the SamebyRik Rue.

40 minMAR 13
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Ep. 20: What is Radio Art (Colin Black)

Ep. 19: Under Construction

It's been a minute, so in this short episode, we update you on what's happening with Phantom Power and what's coming in 2020. The big (and sad) news is that co-host cris cheek is departing. After two years of lending his unique voice, ideas, and turns of phrase to the show--not to mention producing fantastic episodes like his interview with This Heat's Charles Hayward--cris has decided to refocus on his many other creative endeavors. We will miss cris, but the show will go on. And he's been kind enough to let us continue using his golden intro! Check out the pod to hear about some of our upcoming 2020 episodes, with guests including Colin Black, Harriet Ottenheimer, Jonathan Sterne, and Siavash Amini.

7 minFEB 22
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Ep. 19: Under Construction

Ep. 18: Screwed and Chopped (Re-cast)

Today we re-cast one of our favorite episodes, an interview with folklorist and Houston native Langston Collin Wilkins, who studies "slab" culture and the "screwed and chopped" hip hop that rattles the slabs and serves as the culture's soundtrack. Since the 1990s, many of Houston’s African American residents have customized cars and customized the sound of hip hop. Cars called “slabs” swerve a slow path through the city streets, banging out a distinctive local music that paid tribute to those very same streets and neighborhoods. Wilkinsshows us how sonic creativity turns a space—a collection of buildings and streets—into a place that is known, respected, and loved. In this show we hear the slow, muddy, psychedelic sounds of DJ Screw and The Screwed Up Click, including rappers such as Lil Keke, Fat Pat, Big Hawk, andUGK--as well as songs by Geto Boys, Willie Dee, Swishahouse,Point Blank, Biggie Smalls, and MC T Tucker & DJ Irv. Photos by Langston Collin Wilkins. Transcript [low humming and static playing] [CRIS CHEEK] This…is…Phantom Power. [Tamborine beat blends in] Episode 7: Screwed and Chopped. [Hip hop music with vocals cuts in] Parental discretion is advised. Welcome to Phantom Power. I’m cris cheek. Today on the seventh and final episode of our first season, my co-host Mack Hagood converses with Langston Collin Wilkins. Langston is a folklorist an ethnomusicologist active in both academia and the public sector. Working as a traditional art specialist at the Tennessee Arts Commission. Mack spoke with Langston recently about his research into Houston’s unique slab, car culture. The city’s relationship to hip hop and hip hop’s to community. Enjoy. [Different hip hop music plays] [MACK HAGOOD] So before we get into the research of Langston Collin Wilkins, maybe we should get one question out of the way. Why would a folklorist be studying hip hop? Don’t they study things like folk tales or traditional music or quilting? Well, in fact the folklorist I know study things like bodybuilding and fashion and internet memes. Folklorists study everyday creativity. One contemporary definition of folklore is “artistic communication in small groups.” As Langston shows, it’s the way a town like Houston gets a look and a sound all its own, but folklore didn’t lead Langston to hip hop. In fact, it was quite the other way around. [Hip hop music cuts out] [LANGSTON COLLINS WILKINS] Back when I was a kid, around 12 years old, I received my first hip hop record, which was the “Ghetto Boys Resurrection Album” in 1996. [A song from the album plays] Born and raised in Houston, Texas, the south side, where Scarface is from that same area. The Ghetto Boys in my hometown heroes as they are for everyone growing up in Houston in those communities.

35 min2019 DEC 21
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Ep. 18: Screwed and Chopped (Re-cast)

Ep. 17: The Sounds of Silents

What did going to the movies sound like back in the “silent film” era? The answer takes us on a strange journey through Vaudeville, roaming Chautauqua lectures, penny arcades, nickelodeons, and grand movie palaces. As our guest In today’s episode, pioneering scholar of film sound, Rick Altman, tells us, the silent era has a lot to teach us about why sound works the way it does at the movies today. And as our other guest, sound and film historian Eric Dienstfrey tells us, “What we think of today as standard practice is far from inevitable.” In fact, some of the practices we’ll hear about are downright wacky. Audiences today give little thought to the relationship between sound and images at the movies. When we hear a character's footsteps or inner thoughts or hear a rousing orchestral score that the charactercan’thear, it all seems natural. Yet these are all conventions that had to be developed by filmmakers and accepted by audiences. And as Altman and Dienstfrey show us, the ...

43 min2019 NOV 1
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Ep. 17: The Sounds of Silents

Ep. 16: Soar and Chill (Robin James)

Why do certain musical sounds move us while others leave us cold? Are musical trends simply that—or do they contain insights into the culture at large? Our guest is a musicologist who studies pop and electronic dance music. She’s fascinated by the way EDM privileges timbral and rhythmic complexity over the chord changes and harmonic complexities of the blues-based rock and pop music of yore. However, Robin James is also a philosopher and she connects these musical structures to social and economic structures, not to mention structural racism and sexism. Robin James In this episode, cris and Mack have a lengthy, freeform interview and listening session with Robin in which she breaks down the sounds of EDM, pop, hip hop, “chill” playlists, and industrial techno, conceiving them as varied responses to neoliberalism’s intensification of capitalism. Her analysis includes lyrical content, but her main focus is the soars, stutters, breaks, and drops that mimic the socio-economic envir...

60 min2019 SEP 27
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Ep. 16: Soar and Chill (Robin James)

Ep. 15: Goth Diss (Anna M. Williams)

WithMy Gothic Dissertation,University of Iowa PhD Anna M. Williams has transformed the dreary diss into aThis American Life-style podcast. Williams’ witty writing and compelling audio production allow her the double move of making a critical intervention into the study of the gothic novel, while also making an entertaining and thought-provoking series for non-experts. Williams uses famed novels by authors such as Anne Radcliffe and Mary Shelly as an entry point for a critique of graduate school itself—a Medieval institution of shadowy corners, arcane rituals, and a feudal power structure. The result is a first-of-its-kind work that serves as a model for doing literary scholarship in sound. Anna M. Williams This episode ofPhantomPoweroffers you an exclusive preview ofMy Gothic Dissertation. First, Mack Hagood interviews Williams about creating the project, then we listen to a full chapter—a unique reading ofFrankensteinthat explores how the university tradition canrestrictaccess t...

58 min2019 JUL 2
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Ep. 15: Goth Diss (Anna M. Williams)

Ep. 14: Resonant Grains (Craig Eley on Carleen Hutchins)

In the 1950s, a schoolteacher named Carleen Hutchins attempted a revolution in how concert violins are made. In this episode, Craig Eley of the Field Noise podcast tells us how this amateur outsider used 18th century science to disrupt the all-male guild tradition of violin luthiers. Would the myth of the never-equaled Stradivarius violin prove to be true or could a science teacher with a woodshop use an old idea to make new violins better than ever? We also learn about the mysterious beauty of Chladni patterns, the 18th century technique of using tiny particles to reveal how sound moves through resonant objects--the key to Hutchins' merger of art and science.In this episode, we hear the voices of:* Quincy Whitney, Carleen Hutchins biographer and a former arts reporter for the BostonGlobe.* Myles Jackson, a professor of the history of science at Princeton.* Joseph Curtin, a MacArthur-award winning violin maker.* Sam Zygmuntowicz, an extremely renowned violin maker and creator of Strad3D.* Carleen Hutchins herself.You can subscribe to Craig Eley's Field Noise podcast to hear the original version of this story.This episode was edited by Craig Eley and Mack Hagood. Music is by Blue Dot Sessions and Marc Bianchi. The archival interview clips of Carleen Hutchins were provided by filmmaker James Schneider. The interview with Quincy Whitney was recorded by Andrew Parrella at New Hampshire Public Radio. Transcript [ominous music plays][CRIS CHEEK]This…is…Phantom Power.[MACK HAGOOD]Episode 14.[CRIS]Resident grains.[a whirring sound plays, then a string being plucked][CARLEEN HUTCHINS]What I’m interested in now is to see what the waves that are traveling through the woods are like. And those are the things that I think are making a lot of difference in the way, energy and the waves of energy can go through the wood itself. And wood is all sorts of sort of discontinuity, if you will, that will make the energy have to slow down or go around something, it’s a little bit like a river flowing. And if you put some rocks on the edge of a river, you’ll change the whole flow of the river downstream. Think that’s what’s happening in violins. There are certain ways that those blockages, the discontinuity can be worked out. And that’s the kind of thing I’m looking for us to see what happens. Because some of the beautiful issues that I’ve been w...

40 min2019 MAY 24
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Ep. 14: Resonant Grains (Craig Eley on Carleen Hutchins)

Ep 13: Jams Bond (cris cheek)

In an unusual episode, we listen back to field recordings that co-host cris cheek made in 1987 and 1993 on the island of Madagascar. It's a rich sonic travelogue, with incredible musicians appearing at seemingly every stop along the way. Mack interviews cris, who discusses the strangeness and surprises of listening back to the sounds of that other time and place--and listening to the voice of an earlier version of himself. The BBC broadcast some of this material on Radio 3 as ‘The Music of Madagascar,” produced by John Thornley. It won the Sony gold radio award for ‘specialist music program of the year in 1995. A longer version aired as"Mountain, River, Rail and Reef," produced by PhilEngland and Tom Wallace for Resonance FM, the world’s first radio art station as part of 1998'sMeltdown Festivalat theSouth Bank Centre, curated byJohn Peel. This episode takes its name from a boat cris traveled on in Madagascar. Transcript [ominous music plays][CRIS CHEEK]This…is…Phantom Power.[sound of glass being smashed][MACK HAGOOD]Episode 13. [CRIS]James Bond. [MACK]Welcome to another episode of Phantom Power, the podcast about sound in the arts and humanities.[CRIS]Who are you?[MACK]*laughs* I’m Mac Hagood. [CRIS]I’m cris cheek. [MACK]And today we have a very unusual episode because I get to interview cris.[CRIS]Yay![MACK]cris has brought in a program that he produced for the legendary community radio station in London, Resonance FM. Based on your travels in Madagascar, actually two trips you took right?[CRIS]That’s right 1987, 1993, yeah. [MACK]cris, why don’t you tell us a little bit about this show?[CRIS]It was originally broadcast on the BBC. And there was some format things that got in the way of it being a longer show on the BBC. And I wanted to let some of the recordings play a little bit more than they could do in the original.[MACK]In resonance, it was much more of a sort of freeform kind of space where you could let something like that stretch out right?[CRIS]It was pretty emergent as a station at that point, but also yeah, the BBC wanted to cut me distinctly to just under half an hour. [MACK]And why Madagascar? Maybe we should start off with where is Madagascar? [CRIS]Madagascar is off the east coast of Africa. It’s in the Indian Ocean. Fourth largest island on the planet. 90% unique in flora and fauna. Really extraordinary mixtures of people who came fromFrom Polynesia, down the Amoni Arab coast from particularly Southwest India, pirates. Did I mentioned pirates yet? [MACK]No, you didn’t.[CRIS]There were several pirate bases in Madagascar. [MACK]Yeah, and the musical traditions that resulted from that mix are really, really incredible. [CRIS]They are, and the people are really incredible. [MACK]So what we’re going to hear, I’ve heard a little bit of it already. It’s gorgeous music and really some delicious sounds recorded, just delectively. I just really love these recordings and sort of what interests me beyond this sonic travel log that you’re presenting to us, is just the fact that I’m going to hear the you that I didn’t know from 20 years ago, and then you’re also going to sort of hear yourself, the person that you used to be back then.[CRIS]Yeah, that’s why I brought this. I mean, I brought it because we’ve been talking in so many different ways about listening about paying attention to the sounds that are around you, the things that are at the edges of our attention, and really concentrating on those.

55 min2019 MAY 3
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Ep 13: Jams Bond (cris cheek)

Ep. 12: A Book Unbound (Jacob Smith)

What would it be like if scholars presented their research in sound rather than in print? Better yet, what if we could hear them in the act of their research and analysis, pulling different historical sounds from the archives and rubbing them against one another in an audio editor?In today's episode, we get to find out what such an innovative scholarly audiobook would sound like--because our guest has created the first one! Jacob Smith'sESC(University of Michigan Press) is a fascinating sonic exploration of postwar radio drama and contemporary sound art, as well as a meditation on how humans have reshaped the ecological fate of the planet. Before we listen to an excerpt of ESC, Mack interviews Jake about how his skills as a former musician came in handy for his work as an audio academic.You can listen toESC: Sonic Adventure in the Anthropocenein its entirety for free courtesy of the University of Michigan Press.You can also watch Jake's 90s band The Mysteries of Life perform in the"bad music video" Jake mentions oron Conan O'Brien.Jacob Smith is founder and director of the Master of Arts in Sound Arts and Industries, and professor in the Department of Radio/Television/Film at Northwestern University. He is the author of three print-based books on sound:Vocal Tracks: Performance and Sound Media (University of California Press 2008); Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures(University of California Press 2011);and Eco-Sonic Media (University of California Press, 2015). He writes and teaches about the cultural history of media, with a focus on sound and performance.Today's show was edited by Craig Eley and featured music by Blue Dot Sessions. Our intern is Gina Moravec. Transcript [ethereal music plays][CRIS CHEEK]This…is…Phantom Power.[MACK HAGOOD]Episode 12.[CRIS]A book unbound.[MAN ANNOUNCER]Tired of the everyday grind? Ever dream of a life of romantic adventure? Want to get away from it all? We offer you escape. Escape, designed to free you from the four walls of today. For a half hour of high adventure.[old, dramatic music plays. In between are people listing off natural disasters.][MACK]Hey everyone. Welcome back to another episode. This is Mack Hagood. My partner chris cheek is out, so you just got me today. What you just heard is an excerpt from ESC. A fascinating project that’s one part podcast, one part audiobook. And it’s produced by my guest today, Jacob Smith. Jake is the founder and director of the Master of Arts in Sound Arts and Industries program at Northwestern University, where he’s also a professor in the Department of Radio, Television, and Film. So, for those of you who are regular listeners to the show, you know that I work in this disciplinary space that gets called sound studies. So we have all these folks working in this space of sound studies. And yet, how do we publish all of this research that we generate? We publish it in print, or in pixels on the screen, right? We do it via the written word. And that’s why I was so excited about having Jake Smith on today because he is challenging that paradigm, working in sound, and doing something that really could only be done in sound. His new project ESC is an audio native audiobook.[guitar music plays]So what do I mean by that? So basically, this is a book length critical reading of a CBS radio drama from the 1940s and 50s called Escape. But instead of just reading about the radio drama, we actually hear the radio drama itself. And through Jake’s excellent production techniques, we also hear his criticism,

39 min2019 MAR 28
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Ep. 12: A Book Unbound (Jacob Smith)

Ep. 11: Breathing Together (Caroline Bergvall)

Working across and among languages, media, and art forms, Caroline Bergvall’s writingtakes form as published poetic works and performance, frequently of sound-driven projects. Herinterests include multilingual poetics, queer feminist politics and issues of cultural belonging, commissioned and shown by such institutions as MoMA, the Tate Modern, and the Museum of Contemporary Arts in Antwerp, and won numerous awards.Ragadawnis a multimedia performance that explores ideas of multi-lingualism, migration, lost or disappearing languages, and how language and place intersect.Ragadawnis performed with two live voices and recorded elements, outdoors, at dawn, which means the start and end times are location specific.It featuressong composed by Gavin Bryars, sung by Peyee Chen.Ragadawnpremiered at the Festival de la Bâtie (Geneva)and at the Estuary Festival (Southend) in 2016.You can find more work(s) by Caroline Bergvall at:http://carolinebergvall.comAlso on Soundcloud:https://soundcloud....

41 min2019 MAR 15
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Ep. 11: Breathing Together (Caroline Bergvall)

Latest Episodes

Ep. 20: What is Radio Art (Colin Black)

What is radio art? It’s a rather unfamiliar term in the United States, but in other countries, it’s a something of an artistic tradition. Today’s guest,Dr. Colin Black is an internationally acclaimed and award-winning radio artist and composer. He speaks to us about his practice as a radio artist and the influence the Australian radio programThe Listening Roomhad on Australia’s sonic avant garde. We then listen to his pieceOut Of Thin Air: Radio Art Essay #1, which both explores and exemplifies the possibilities of radio art. It’s both informative and a total treat for the ears! The piece was originally commissioned by the Dreamlands commissions for Radio Arts, funded by the Arts Council England and Kent County Council. Out Of Thin Air: Radio Art Essay #1is a meta-referencing poetic reflection and meditation onradio art underpinned by an artistic treatment of dislocation, transmission, reception and placeas a thematic underscore. The work is in the form of an abstract song cycle that chieflyoscillates between “songs” originating from High Frequency (HR) radio static/broadcastsbetween 3 and 30 MHz and those from interviewees replying to questions relating to radio art.Location recordings, sound effect and musical composition weave this originating materialtogether to form a sonic confluence and juxtaposition of elements to stimulate the listener’simagination while offering an insight into the work’s subject matter. Interviewees (in order of appearance): Armeno Alberts, Tom Roe, Jean-Philippe Renoult,Gregory Whitehead, Götz Naleppa, Andrew McLennan, Elisabeth Zimmermann, HeidiGrundmann, Andreas Hagelüken, Teri Rueb and Kaye Mortley Producer and Composer: Colin Black High Frequency (HR) radio receiver operator: Dimitri Papagianakis Duration: 00:25:10 Music for this episode is by Blue the Fifth.We also hear a brief excerpt ofThings Change,Things Stay the SamebyRik Rue.

40 minMAR 13
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Ep. 20: What is Radio Art (Colin Black)

Ep. 19: Under Construction

It's been a minute, so in this short episode, we update you on what's happening with Phantom Power and what's coming in 2020. The big (and sad) news is that co-host cris cheek is departing. After two years of lending his unique voice, ideas, and turns of phrase to the show--not to mention producing fantastic episodes like his interview with This Heat's Charles Hayward--cris has decided to refocus on his many other creative endeavors. We will miss cris, but the show will go on. And he's been kind enough to let us continue using his golden intro! Check out the pod to hear about some of our upcoming 2020 episodes, with guests including Colin Black, Harriet Ottenheimer, Jonathan Sterne, and Siavash Amini.

7 minFEB 22
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Ep. 19: Under Construction

Ep. 18: Screwed and Chopped (Re-cast)

Today we re-cast one of our favorite episodes, an interview with folklorist and Houston native Langston Collin Wilkins, who studies "slab" culture and the "screwed and chopped" hip hop that rattles the slabs and serves as the culture's soundtrack. Since the 1990s, many of Houston’s African American residents have customized cars and customized the sound of hip hop. Cars called “slabs” swerve a slow path through the city streets, banging out a distinctive local music that paid tribute to those very same streets and neighborhoods. Wilkinsshows us how sonic creativity turns a space—a collection of buildings and streets—into a place that is known, respected, and loved. In this show we hear the slow, muddy, psychedelic sounds of DJ Screw and The Screwed Up Click, including rappers such as Lil Keke, Fat Pat, Big Hawk, andUGK--as well as songs by Geto Boys, Willie Dee, Swishahouse,Point Blank, Biggie Smalls, and MC T Tucker & DJ Irv. Photos by Langston Collin Wilkins. Transcript [low humming and static playing] [CRIS CHEEK] This…is…Phantom Power. [Tamborine beat blends in] Episode 7: Screwed and Chopped. [Hip hop music with vocals cuts in] Parental discretion is advised. Welcome to Phantom Power. I’m cris cheek. Today on the seventh and final episode of our first season, my co-host Mack Hagood converses with Langston Collin Wilkins. Langston is a folklorist an ethnomusicologist active in both academia and the public sector. Working as a traditional art specialist at the Tennessee Arts Commission. Mack spoke with Langston recently about his research into Houston’s unique slab, car culture. The city’s relationship to hip hop and hip hop’s to community. Enjoy. [Different hip hop music plays] [MACK HAGOOD] So before we get into the research of Langston Collin Wilkins, maybe we should get one question out of the way. Why would a folklorist be studying hip hop? Don’t they study things like folk tales or traditional music or quilting? Well, in fact the folklorist I know study things like bodybuilding and fashion and internet memes. Folklorists study everyday creativity. One contemporary definition of folklore is “artistic communication in small groups.” As Langston shows, it’s the way a town like Houston gets a look and a sound all its own, but folklore didn’t lead Langston to hip hop. In fact, it was quite the other way around. [Hip hop music cuts out] [LANGSTON COLLINS WILKINS] Back when I was a kid, around 12 years old, I received my first hip hop record, which was the “Ghetto Boys Resurrection Album” in 1996. [A song from the album plays] Born and raised in Houston, Texas, the south side, where Scarface is from that same area. The Ghetto Boys in my hometown heroes as they are for everyone growing up in Houston in those communities.

35 min2019 DEC 21
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Ep. 18: Screwed and Chopped (Re-cast)

Ep. 17: The Sounds of Silents

What did going to the movies sound like back in the “silent film” era? The answer takes us on a strange journey through Vaudeville, roaming Chautauqua lectures, penny arcades, nickelodeons, and grand movie palaces. As our guest In today’s episode, pioneering scholar of film sound, Rick Altman, tells us, the silent era has a lot to teach us about why sound works the way it does at the movies today. And as our other guest, sound and film historian Eric Dienstfrey tells us, “What we think of today as standard practice is far from inevitable.” In fact, some of the practices we’ll hear about are downright wacky. Audiences today give little thought to the relationship between sound and images at the movies. When we hear a character's footsteps or inner thoughts or hear a rousing orchestral score that the charactercan’thear, it all seems natural. Yet these are all conventions that had to be developed by filmmakers and accepted by audiences. And as Altman and Dienstfrey show us, the ...

43 min2019 NOV 1
Comments
Ep. 17: The Sounds of Silents

Ep. 16: Soar and Chill (Robin James)

Why do certain musical sounds move us while others leave us cold? Are musical trends simply that—or do they contain insights into the culture at large? Our guest is a musicologist who studies pop and electronic dance music. She’s fascinated by the way EDM privileges timbral and rhythmic complexity over the chord changes and harmonic complexities of the blues-based rock and pop music of yore. However, Robin James is also a philosopher and she connects these musical structures to social and economic structures, not to mention structural racism and sexism. Robin James In this episode, cris and Mack have a lengthy, freeform interview and listening session with Robin in which she breaks down the sounds of EDM, pop, hip hop, “chill” playlists, and industrial techno, conceiving them as varied responses to neoliberalism’s intensification of capitalism. Her analysis includes lyrical content, but her main focus is the soars, stutters, breaks, and drops that mimic the socio-economic envir...

60 min2019 SEP 27
Comments
Ep. 16: Soar and Chill (Robin James)

Ep. 15: Goth Diss (Anna M. Williams)

WithMy Gothic Dissertation,University of Iowa PhD Anna M. Williams has transformed the dreary diss into aThis American Life-style podcast. Williams’ witty writing and compelling audio production allow her the double move of making a critical intervention into the study of the gothic novel, while also making an entertaining and thought-provoking series for non-experts. Williams uses famed novels by authors such as Anne Radcliffe and Mary Shelly as an entry point for a critique of graduate school itself—a Medieval institution of shadowy corners, arcane rituals, and a feudal power structure. The result is a first-of-its-kind work that serves as a model for doing literary scholarship in sound. Anna M. Williams This episode ofPhantomPoweroffers you an exclusive preview ofMy Gothic Dissertation. First, Mack Hagood interviews Williams about creating the project, then we listen to a full chapter—a unique reading ofFrankensteinthat explores how the university tradition canrestrictaccess t...

58 min2019 JUL 2
Comments
Ep. 15: Goth Diss (Anna M. Williams)

Ep. 14: Resonant Grains (Craig Eley on Carleen Hutchins)

In the 1950s, a schoolteacher named Carleen Hutchins attempted a revolution in how concert violins are made. In this episode, Craig Eley of the Field Noise podcast tells us how this amateur outsider used 18th century science to disrupt the all-male guild tradition of violin luthiers. Would the myth of the never-equaled Stradivarius violin prove to be true or could a science teacher with a woodshop use an old idea to make new violins better than ever? We also learn about the mysterious beauty of Chladni patterns, the 18th century technique of using tiny particles to reveal how sound moves through resonant objects--the key to Hutchins' merger of art and science.In this episode, we hear the voices of:* Quincy Whitney, Carleen Hutchins biographer and a former arts reporter for the BostonGlobe.* Myles Jackson, a professor of the history of science at Princeton.* Joseph Curtin, a MacArthur-award winning violin maker.* Sam Zygmuntowicz, an extremely renowned violin maker and creator of Strad3D.* Carleen Hutchins herself.You can subscribe to Craig Eley's Field Noise podcast to hear the original version of this story.This episode was edited by Craig Eley and Mack Hagood. Music is by Blue Dot Sessions and Marc Bianchi. The archival interview clips of Carleen Hutchins were provided by filmmaker James Schneider. The interview with Quincy Whitney was recorded by Andrew Parrella at New Hampshire Public Radio. Transcript [ominous music plays][CRIS CHEEK]This…is…Phantom Power.[MACK HAGOOD]Episode 14.[CRIS]Resident grains.[a whirring sound plays, then a string being plucked][CARLEEN HUTCHINS]What I’m interested in now is to see what the waves that are traveling through the woods are like. And those are the things that I think are making a lot of difference in the way, energy and the waves of energy can go through the wood itself. And wood is all sorts of sort of discontinuity, if you will, that will make the energy have to slow down or go around something, it’s a little bit like a river flowing. And if you put some rocks on the edge of a river, you’ll change the whole flow of the river downstream. Think that’s what’s happening in violins. There are certain ways that those blockages, the discontinuity can be worked out. And that’s the kind of thing I’m looking for us to see what happens. Because some of the beautiful issues that I’ve been w...

40 min2019 MAY 24
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Ep. 14: Resonant Grains (Craig Eley on Carleen Hutchins)

Ep 13: Jams Bond (cris cheek)

In an unusual episode, we listen back to field recordings that co-host cris cheek made in 1987 and 1993 on the island of Madagascar. It's a rich sonic travelogue, with incredible musicians appearing at seemingly every stop along the way. Mack interviews cris, who discusses the strangeness and surprises of listening back to the sounds of that other time and place--and listening to the voice of an earlier version of himself. The BBC broadcast some of this material on Radio 3 as ‘The Music of Madagascar,” produced by John Thornley. It won the Sony gold radio award for ‘specialist music program of the year in 1995. A longer version aired as"Mountain, River, Rail and Reef," produced by PhilEngland and Tom Wallace for Resonance FM, the world’s first radio art station as part of 1998'sMeltdown Festivalat theSouth Bank Centre, curated byJohn Peel. This episode takes its name from a boat cris traveled on in Madagascar. Transcript [ominous music plays][CRIS CHEEK]This…is…Phantom Power.[sound of glass being smashed][MACK HAGOOD]Episode 13. [CRIS]James Bond. [MACK]Welcome to another episode of Phantom Power, the podcast about sound in the arts and humanities.[CRIS]Who are you?[MACK]*laughs* I’m Mac Hagood. [CRIS]I’m cris cheek. [MACK]And today we have a very unusual episode because I get to interview cris.[CRIS]Yay![MACK]cris has brought in a program that he produced for the legendary community radio station in London, Resonance FM. Based on your travels in Madagascar, actually two trips you took right?[CRIS]That’s right 1987, 1993, yeah. [MACK]cris, why don’t you tell us a little bit about this show?[CRIS]It was originally broadcast on the BBC. And there was some format things that got in the way of it being a longer show on the BBC. And I wanted to let some of the recordings play a little bit more than they could do in the original.[MACK]In resonance, it was much more of a sort of freeform kind of space where you could let something like that stretch out right?[CRIS]It was pretty emergent as a station at that point, but also yeah, the BBC wanted to cut me distinctly to just under half an hour. [MACK]And why Madagascar? Maybe we should start off with where is Madagascar? [CRIS]Madagascar is off the east coast of Africa. It’s in the Indian Ocean. Fourth largest island on the planet. 90% unique in flora and fauna. Really extraordinary mixtures of people who came fromFrom Polynesia, down the Amoni Arab coast from particularly Southwest India, pirates. Did I mentioned pirates yet? [MACK]No, you didn’t.[CRIS]There were several pirate bases in Madagascar. [MACK]Yeah, and the musical traditions that resulted from that mix are really, really incredible. [CRIS]They are, and the people are really incredible. [MACK]So what we’re going to hear, I’ve heard a little bit of it already. It’s gorgeous music and really some delicious sounds recorded, just delectively. I just really love these recordings and sort of what interests me beyond this sonic travel log that you’re presenting to us, is just the fact that I’m going to hear the you that I didn’t know from 20 years ago, and then you’re also going to sort of hear yourself, the person that you used to be back then.[CRIS]Yeah, that’s why I brought this. I mean, I brought it because we’ve been talking in so many different ways about listening about paying attention to the sounds that are around you, the things that are at the edges of our attention, and really concentrating on those.

55 min2019 MAY 3
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Ep 13: Jams Bond (cris cheek)

Ep. 12: A Book Unbound (Jacob Smith)

What would it be like if scholars presented their research in sound rather than in print? Better yet, what if we could hear them in the act of their research and analysis, pulling different historical sounds from the archives and rubbing them against one another in an audio editor?In today's episode, we get to find out what such an innovative scholarly audiobook would sound like--because our guest has created the first one! Jacob Smith'sESC(University of Michigan Press) is a fascinating sonic exploration of postwar radio drama and contemporary sound art, as well as a meditation on how humans have reshaped the ecological fate of the planet. Before we listen to an excerpt of ESC, Mack interviews Jake about how his skills as a former musician came in handy for his work as an audio academic.You can listen toESC: Sonic Adventure in the Anthropocenein its entirety for free courtesy of the University of Michigan Press.You can also watch Jake's 90s band The Mysteries of Life perform in the"bad music video" Jake mentions oron Conan O'Brien.Jacob Smith is founder and director of the Master of Arts in Sound Arts and Industries, and professor in the Department of Radio/Television/Film at Northwestern University. He is the author of three print-based books on sound:Vocal Tracks: Performance and Sound Media (University of California Press 2008); Spoken Word: Postwar American Phonograph Cultures(University of California Press 2011);and Eco-Sonic Media (University of California Press, 2015). He writes and teaches about the cultural history of media, with a focus on sound and performance.Today's show was edited by Craig Eley and featured music by Blue Dot Sessions. Our intern is Gina Moravec. Transcript [ethereal music plays][CRIS CHEEK]This…is…Phantom Power.[MACK HAGOOD]Episode 12.[CRIS]A book unbound.[MAN ANNOUNCER]Tired of the everyday grind? Ever dream of a life of romantic adventure? Want to get away from it all? We offer you escape. Escape, designed to free you from the four walls of today. For a half hour of high adventure.[old, dramatic music plays. In between are people listing off natural disasters.][MACK]Hey everyone. Welcome back to another episode. This is Mack Hagood. My partner chris cheek is out, so you just got me today. What you just heard is an excerpt from ESC. A fascinating project that’s one part podcast, one part audiobook. And it’s produced by my guest today, Jacob Smith. Jake is the founder and director of the Master of Arts in Sound Arts and Industries program at Northwestern University, where he’s also a professor in the Department of Radio, Television, and Film. So, for those of you who are regular listeners to the show, you know that I work in this disciplinary space that gets called sound studies. So we have all these folks working in this space of sound studies. And yet, how do we publish all of this research that we generate? We publish it in print, or in pixels on the screen, right? We do it via the written word. And that’s why I was so excited about having Jake Smith on today because he is challenging that paradigm, working in sound, and doing something that really could only be done in sound. His new project ESC is an audio native audiobook.[guitar music plays]So what do I mean by that? So basically, this is a book length critical reading of a CBS radio drama from the 1940s and 50s called Escape. But instead of just reading about the radio drama, we actually hear the radio drama itself. And through Jake’s excellent production techniques, we also hear his criticism,

39 min2019 MAR 28
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Ep. 12: A Book Unbound (Jacob Smith)

Ep. 11: Breathing Together (Caroline Bergvall)

Working across and among languages, media, and art forms, Caroline Bergvall’s writingtakes form as published poetic works and performance, frequently of sound-driven projects. Herinterests include multilingual poetics, queer feminist politics and issues of cultural belonging, commissioned and shown by such institutions as MoMA, the Tate Modern, and the Museum of Contemporary Arts in Antwerp, and won numerous awards.Ragadawnis a multimedia performance that explores ideas of multi-lingualism, migration, lost or disappearing languages, and how language and place intersect.Ragadawnis performed with two live voices and recorded elements, outdoors, at dawn, which means the start and end times are location specific.It featuressong composed by Gavin Bryars, sung by Peyee Chen.Ragadawnpremiered at the Festival de la Bâtie (Geneva)and at the Estuary Festival (Southend) in 2016.You can find more work(s) by Caroline Bergvall at:http://carolinebergvall.comAlso on Soundcloud:https://soundcloud....

41 min2019 MAR 15
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Ep. 11: Breathing Together (Caroline Bergvall)
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