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Shades of Green

Sadie Beaton

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Shades of Green

Shades of Green

Sadie Beaton

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About Us

Welcome to Shades of Green, a podcast exploring environmental justice from unceded Mi’kmaq territory. This series features a variety of amazing voices -- including Lincolnville resident James Desmond, MSVU Nancy’s Chair El Jones, frontline Mi’kmaq activists Barbara Low, Madonna Bernard, Paula Isaac and Michelle Paul, Order of Canada recipient Catherine Martin, Africville descendent and teacher Jaden Dixon, Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard, Sipekne’katik District War Chief Jim Maloney, archeologist and ethnographer Roger Lewis, and environmental justice researchers Dr. Cheryl Teelucksingh, Dr. Carolyn Finney, Dr. Julian Agyeman, and Dr. Ingrid Waldron, amongst others.Shades of Green was made possible by countless people engaged in thinking about and fighting for environmental justice in Mi'kma'ki, across Turtle Island and Beyond. It has been supported by Ecology Action Centre and the Community Conservation Research Network. Our theme was composed by Nick Durado. https://budi.bandcamp.com/Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you enjoy fine podcasts, and follow us on Twitter: @NSShadesofGreen

Latest Episodes

Justice in Public: Reconciliation, Reparations and the Decolonized Future

What will Mi'kma'ki look and feel like when environmental justice is achieved? Over the last couple of years, we've asked this question to dozens of people working on the front lines of these movements. Becauseit turns out that environmental justice is not just about dismantling systems of oppression like colonial and white supremacy. It definitely IS about those things, but it's also about imagining and shaping futures where we can all safely live, work and play together on these unceded lands, humans and non-humans alike. For some it was a daunting questions. After all, environmental justice can only happen when we've healed from all of the other kinds of injustice too. As Indigenous Climate Justice activist and member of Chipewan First Nation Eriel Deranger describes, "It’s not just about the environmental movement. Decolonization only works if it’s across the board. Through economics, through commerce, through trade, through the development of those resources. For me, decoloni...

70 MIN2018 MAR 15
Comments
Justice in Public: Reconciliation, Reparations and the Decolonized Future

Listen Up: Building Relationships Across Difference in the Environmental Movement

When it comes to environmental justice, are environmental organizations listening? Are we willing to change in the ways that we are being asked? Environmental justice movements define our environment more broadly than the mainstream environmental movement, recognizing the interconnectedness of the social and ecological crises we are facing. Centring the voices of Black, Indigenous and people of colour, environmental justice works to resist and reshape the ways that race, space and power intersect. These grassroots advocates have also repeatedly called on mainstream environmental organizations to address environmental racism, elitism in the movement, and lack of diverse representation on their staffs and boards. As questions around diversity, decolonization, and justice begin to gain more traction in mainstream social movements, environmental organizations are beginning to respond. But the path is messy and uncertain. As Ecology Action Centre‘s Joanna Bull describes: “We don’t act...

68 MIN2018 MAR 1
Comments
Listen Up: Building Relationships Across Difference in the Environmental Movement

Peace, Friendship and Environmental Justice: The Alton Gas Resistance

"We are all Treaty people". It's a phrase we're hearing more often these days. But what does it really mean, here in Mi'kma'ki? And what does it have to do with environmental justice? Most settlers don't think about the Treaties much. Even here in unceded Mi'kmaq territory, many of us imagine them as one-time transactions in the deep past.However, as we'll hear in this episodes of Shades of Green, many Mi'kmaq rights holders understand the Peace and Friendship Treaties as sacred, living agreements. As Sipekne’katik District Warrior Chief Jim Maloneyputs it:“I agree that we are a treaty people, and I have heard the Premier say that. His Treaty is on paper. My Treaty is on land. My tracks on my ground: that’s my signature, not on a piece of paper.” In this episode of Shades of Green, we spend time with frontline Water Protectorsresisting the Alton Gas project at the Truckhouse and Treaty Camp along the banks of the Sipekne'katik River.Alton Gas is proposing to dump massive quantit...

61 MIN2018 FEB 15
Comments
Peace, Friendship and Environmental Justice: The Alton Gas Resistance

Toxic Legacy: Setting a Context for Environmental Racism in Nova Scotia

Why are there so many garbage dumps close to African Nova Scotian communities? Why do Mi’kmaq communities experience food insecurity on their unceded territory? Who defines what counts as environmental racism? The roots of environmental racism run pretty deep in Nova Scotia. About 500 years deep. On this episode of Shades of Green, we get curious about the forces that have shaped how we relate to the land and to each other here in unceded Mi’kmaq territory. Colonization has wrapped the histories of Mi’kmaq rights holders up with communities of Acadians, Scots, Black Loyalists, Maroons, Planters, and more recent immigrant communities. These displacements and migrations set the scene for the environmental racism that we see here today. Before European colonizers arrived on these shores, Mi’kmaq communities had long been caring gently for these lands and waters. We talked to Roger Lewis about the violent disruption that colonial settlers brought with them. Roger is the Curator of E...

59 MIN2018 FEB 8
Comments
Toxic Legacy: Setting a Context for Environmental Racism in Nova Scotia

What is the Environment and Where is the Justice?

What is environmentalism? What do we mean when we talk about “the environment” here on unceded Mi'kmaq territory? Who defines what's included in that meaning, and what's left out? At Shades of Green, these juicy questions have led to... well, more questions. The Canadian Encyclopediatells us that the environmental movement got started in the early 1900s, "when conservationists aimed to slow the rapid depletion of Canadian resources in favour of more regulated management.” It sounds like a time where settlers were beginning to sense that the forests of Turtle Island weren't as endless as they'd once seemed. When we talked to Mi'kmaq rights holder and land defender Barbara Low, she described the origins of environmentalism a little differently.“When settlers started showing up we were doing our best to show them how to be human beings, like us. 'We’re the human beings and this is how the human beings interact with the trees and the rocks and the beavers and the deer and the moose'. They wouldn’t listen... they were just going to go on their way. And so they went on their way. Now a few hundred short years later, they come around and they are like, 'We need to save the environment!' 'Join us!" Environmentalism has shifted and changed over time, but as we'll hear in this episode,the movement is still shaped by colonial thinking, including unacknowledged racism and paternalism.AsDr. Carolyn Finneytold us: "A student asked me, ‘I don’t know how to say this... but it’s so interesting how in the environmental movement it seems people care so much about animals, but they don’t really care about black people. So what do we do with that?” I said, ‘wellyou just hit that on the head!’" We found that folks outside of the mainstream environmental movement tend to define “the environment” more broadly.Mi'kmaq artist and metal fabricator Tayla Paulsummed it up like this: "This is my environment too. Kjipuktuk. Halifax. This is where my ancestors are. This is where their bodies are buried in the ground. This is the environment. It’s not just about the trees and the undeveloped areas. It is definitely about those areas but it’s not just about those areas. It’s about the environment that we experience every day, and that includes the social environment." Environmental justice takes that expanded definition and works to highlight how race, space and power intersect in unjust ways across the land and in our communities. As poet and activistEl Jonesput it,"The environment isn’t unattached to police brutality, police shootings and mass incarceration of black people. For me, adding justice moves it beyond simply thinking in terms of land and environment to thinking about how space and race intersect and interact, and how poverty and space interact.” We hope you'll tune into our first Shades of Green podcast episode, "What is the Environment and Where is the Justice?" Pause, listen and get curious with us as we explore some different ways of understanding ourselves, our environment,and our work to protect it. Featuredvoices: Dr. Julian Agyeman Eriel Deranger Dr. Carolyn Finney El Jones Mark Leeming Barbara Low Catherine Martin Tayla Paul Dr. Cheryl Teelucksingh Dr. Ingrid Waldron Quotes have been condensed here for clarity and brevity. Huge thanks to every one of the ears and voices that made this episode possible. Further thanks to Joanna Brenchley, Erica Butler, Jen Graham and Christen Kong. Our theme was composed by the incredible Nick Durado. We are also grateful for permission from Lido Pimiento to excerpt from her gorgeous song Humano. This project has been supported by Ecology Action Centre and the Community Conservation Research Network Subscribe on iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or Feedburner. And follow us on Twitter! For further reading, visit the original post at ShadesofGreenweb.wordpress.com/Season2Ep1

50 MIN2018 FEB 1
Comments
What is the Environment and Where is the Justice?

Podcast Series Trailer

Shades of Green is a podcast series exploring environmental justice from unceded Mi'kmaq Territory. It is supported by Ecology Action Centre and the Community Conservation Research Network. Our theme was composed by Nick Durado. (https://budi.bandcamp.com/) Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Feedburner or Soundcloud!

3 MIN2018 JAN 24
Comments
Podcast Series Trailer

Alan Knockwood and Wallace Nevin

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to be invited to visit to elder Alan Knockwood’s house in Sipeknekatik . Alan Knockwood is an elder and pipe carrier. He is also active as a Human Rights consultant and Historian. It was a glorious, welcoming place with open doors for pets and kids and family to come and go, which explains some of the background noise you will hear. In fact, his brother Wallace Nevin just happened to drop by, who just happens to be something of an historian, and we were lucky double over because he was generous enough with his time to st down at the itchen table and join us. We had a long and free flowing conversation all afternoon. So what I have tried to do for the purposes of our show is piece together some of the highlights of our conversation to give you a sense of perspective about what Alan and Wallace feel is happening in Sipeknekatik, including the imposition of the proposed Alton Gas storage project and how that relates to the struggle to even conceive o...

29 MIN2016 AUG 29
Comments
Alan Knockwood and Wallace Nevin

Dylan Letendre and Tayla Paul

Tayla Paul and Dylan Letendre are two participants in a project exploring urban Aboriginal identity called “This is What I Wish you Knew.” Fifty community members carved and painted their personal stories onto rectangular clay tiles that are now displayed at the Mi’kmaw Native Friendship Centre in Halifax, working to build on the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The project was one of six projects across Canada approved through the Canada Council for the Arts (RE) conciliation Initiative which receives funding from the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and the Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada. Stay tuned for our conversation but I would also urge you to get yourself to the Friendship Centre on Gottingen Street in Halifax, and spend some time with these beautiful and important tiles.

44 MIN2016 AUG 22
Comments
Dylan Letendre and Tayla Paul

Sudha Nandagopal

Sudha Nandagopal oversees Seattle’s new environmental justice initiative — one of the only examples of its kind in the country. As program director, she convenes a working group that represents the interests of people of color, immigrants, refugees, and low-income and limited-English individuals in the face of environmental decision-making. Part of this work has been the creation and now, more recently, implementation of the Seattle Equity and Environment Agenda, a groundbreaking new document outlining the ways in which Seattle can begin to pair equity and environment in its work. You should definitely look it up: http://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/OSE/SeattleEquityAgenda.pdf

29 MIN2016 AUG 15
Comments
Sudha Nandagopal

Randolph Haluza-Delay

Describing himself as a father, birdwatcher, and cycle commuter, Randolph Haluza-Delay spent 15 years as a wilderness guide. As a sociology professor at The King’s University in Edmonton, Alberta (Canada) for the past twelve years, he has published over 40 academic journal articles and book chapters, and occasional items for magazines and newspapers. This includes two co-edited books: Speaking for Ourselves: Environmental Justice in Canada (The University of British Columbia Press, 2009), and the recently released How the World’s Religions are Responding to Climate Change: Social Science Investigations (Routledge, 2014). His PhD is in Education from the University of Western Ontario. He also holds a Bachelor’s degree in Zoology and Master’s in Recreation. As a social scientist, his research focuses on social movements, religion and the environment, environmental education, and the cultural politics of sustainability. As a citizen, he is active in peace and anti-racism initiative...

29 MIN2016 AUG 2
Comments
Randolph Haluza-Delay

Latest Episodes

Justice in Public: Reconciliation, Reparations and the Decolonized Future

What will Mi'kma'ki look and feel like when environmental justice is achieved? Over the last couple of years, we've asked this question to dozens of people working on the front lines of these movements. Becauseit turns out that environmental justice is not just about dismantling systems of oppression like colonial and white supremacy. It definitely IS about those things, but it's also about imagining and shaping futures where we can all safely live, work and play together on these unceded lands, humans and non-humans alike. For some it was a daunting questions. After all, environmental justice can only happen when we've healed from all of the other kinds of injustice too. As Indigenous Climate Justice activist and member of Chipewan First Nation Eriel Deranger describes, "It’s not just about the environmental movement. Decolonization only works if it’s across the board. Through economics, through commerce, through trade, through the development of those resources. For me, decoloni...

70 MIN2018 MAR 15
Comments
Justice in Public: Reconciliation, Reparations and the Decolonized Future

Listen Up: Building Relationships Across Difference in the Environmental Movement

When it comes to environmental justice, are environmental organizations listening? Are we willing to change in the ways that we are being asked? Environmental justice movements define our environment more broadly than the mainstream environmental movement, recognizing the interconnectedness of the social and ecological crises we are facing. Centring the voices of Black, Indigenous and people of colour, environmental justice works to resist and reshape the ways that race, space and power intersect. These grassroots advocates have also repeatedly called on mainstream environmental organizations to address environmental racism, elitism in the movement, and lack of diverse representation on their staffs and boards. As questions around diversity, decolonization, and justice begin to gain more traction in mainstream social movements, environmental organizations are beginning to respond. But the path is messy and uncertain. As Ecology Action Centre‘s Joanna Bull describes: “We don’t act...

68 MIN2018 MAR 1
Comments
Listen Up: Building Relationships Across Difference in the Environmental Movement

Peace, Friendship and Environmental Justice: The Alton Gas Resistance

"We are all Treaty people". It's a phrase we're hearing more often these days. But what does it really mean, here in Mi'kma'ki? And what does it have to do with environmental justice? Most settlers don't think about the Treaties much. Even here in unceded Mi'kmaq territory, many of us imagine them as one-time transactions in the deep past.However, as we'll hear in this episodes of Shades of Green, many Mi'kmaq rights holders understand the Peace and Friendship Treaties as sacred, living agreements. As Sipekne’katik District Warrior Chief Jim Maloneyputs it:“I agree that we are a treaty people, and I have heard the Premier say that. His Treaty is on paper. My Treaty is on land. My tracks on my ground: that’s my signature, not on a piece of paper.” In this episode of Shades of Green, we spend time with frontline Water Protectorsresisting the Alton Gas project at the Truckhouse and Treaty Camp along the banks of the Sipekne'katik River.Alton Gas is proposing to dump massive quantit...

61 MIN2018 FEB 15
Comments
Peace, Friendship and Environmental Justice: The Alton Gas Resistance

Toxic Legacy: Setting a Context for Environmental Racism in Nova Scotia

Why are there so many garbage dumps close to African Nova Scotian communities? Why do Mi’kmaq communities experience food insecurity on their unceded territory? Who defines what counts as environmental racism? The roots of environmental racism run pretty deep in Nova Scotia. About 500 years deep. On this episode of Shades of Green, we get curious about the forces that have shaped how we relate to the land and to each other here in unceded Mi’kmaq territory. Colonization has wrapped the histories of Mi’kmaq rights holders up with communities of Acadians, Scots, Black Loyalists, Maroons, Planters, and more recent immigrant communities. These displacements and migrations set the scene for the environmental racism that we see here today. Before European colonizers arrived on these shores, Mi’kmaq communities had long been caring gently for these lands and waters. We talked to Roger Lewis about the violent disruption that colonial settlers brought with them. Roger is the Curator of E...

59 MIN2018 FEB 8
Comments
Toxic Legacy: Setting a Context for Environmental Racism in Nova Scotia

What is the Environment and Where is the Justice?

What is environmentalism? What do we mean when we talk about “the environment” here on unceded Mi'kmaq territory? Who defines what's included in that meaning, and what's left out? At Shades of Green, these juicy questions have led to... well, more questions. The Canadian Encyclopediatells us that the environmental movement got started in the early 1900s, "when conservationists aimed to slow the rapid depletion of Canadian resources in favour of more regulated management.” It sounds like a time where settlers were beginning to sense that the forests of Turtle Island weren't as endless as they'd once seemed. When we talked to Mi'kmaq rights holder and land defender Barbara Low, she described the origins of environmentalism a little differently.“When settlers started showing up we were doing our best to show them how to be human beings, like us. 'We’re the human beings and this is how the human beings interact with the trees and the rocks and the beavers and the deer and the moose'. They wouldn’t listen... they were just going to go on their way. And so they went on their way. Now a few hundred short years later, they come around and they are like, 'We need to save the environment!' 'Join us!" Environmentalism has shifted and changed over time, but as we'll hear in this episode,the movement is still shaped by colonial thinking, including unacknowledged racism and paternalism.AsDr. Carolyn Finneytold us: "A student asked me, ‘I don’t know how to say this... but it’s so interesting how in the environmental movement it seems people care so much about animals, but they don’t really care about black people. So what do we do with that?” I said, ‘wellyou just hit that on the head!’" We found that folks outside of the mainstream environmental movement tend to define “the environment” more broadly.Mi'kmaq artist and metal fabricator Tayla Paulsummed it up like this: "This is my environment too. Kjipuktuk. Halifax. This is where my ancestors are. This is where their bodies are buried in the ground. This is the environment. It’s not just about the trees and the undeveloped areas. It is definitely about those areas but it’s not just about those areas. It’s about the environment that we experience every day, and that includes the social environment." Environmental justice takes that expanded definition and works to highlight how race, space and power intersect in unjust ways across the land and in our communities. As poet and activistEl Jonesput it,"The environment isn’t unattached to police brutality, police shootings and mass incarceration of black people. For me, adding justice moves it beyond simply thinking in terms of land and environment to thinking about how space and race intersect and interact, and how poverty and space interact.” We hope you'll tune into our first Shades of Green podcast episode, "What is the Environment and Where is the Justice?" Pause, listen and get curious with us as we explore some different ways of understanding ourselves, our environment,and our work to protect it. Featuredvoices: Dr. Julian Agyeman Eriel Deranger Dr. Carolyn Finney El Jones Mark Leeming Barbara Low Catherine Martin Tayla Paul Dr. Cheryl Teelucksingh Dr. Ingrid Waldron Quotes have been condensed here for clarity and brevity. Huge thanks to every one of the ears and voices that made this episode possible. Further thanks to Joanna Brenchley, Erica Butler, Jen Graham and Christen Kong. Our theme was composed by the incredible Nick Durado. We are also grateful for permission from Lido Pimiento to excerpt from her gorgeous song Humano. This project has been supported by Ecology Action Centre and the Community Conservation Research Network Subscribe on iTunes, SoundCloud, Stitcher, or Feedburner. And follow us on Twitter! For further reading, visit the original post at ShadesofGreenweb.wordpress.com/Season2Ep1

50 MIN2018 FEB 1
Comments
What is the Environment and Where is the Justice?

Podcast Series Trailer

Shades of Green is a podcast series exploring environmental justice from unceded Mi'kmaq Territory. It is supported by Ecology Action Centre and the Community Conservation Research Network. Our theme was composed by Nick Durado. (https://budi.bandcamp.com/) Subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Feedburner or Soundcloud!

3 MIN2018 JAN 24
Comments
Podcast Series Trailer

Alan Knockwood and Wallace Nevin

A few weeks ago I was lucky enough to be invited to visit to elder Alan Knockwood’s house in Sipeknekatik . Alan Knockwood is an elder and pipe carrier. He is also active as a Human Rights consultant and Historian. It was a glorious, welcoming place with open doors for pets and kids and family to come and go, which explains some of the background noise you will hear. In fact, his brother Wallace Nevin just happened to drop by, who just happens to be something of an historian, and we were lucky double over because he was generous enough with his time to st down at the itchen table and join us. We had a long and free flowing conversation all afternoon. So what I have tried to do for the purposes of our show is piece together some of the highlights of our conversation to give you a sense of perspective about what Alan and Wallace feel is happening in Sipeknekatik, including the imposition of the proposed Alton Gas storage project and how that relates to the struggle to even conceive o...

29 MIN2016 AUG 29
Comments
Alan Knockwood and Wallace Nevin

Dylan Letendre and Tayla Paul

Tayla Paul and Dylan Letendre are two participants in a project exploring urban Aboriginal identity called “This is What I Wish you Knew.” Fifty community members carved and painted their personal stories onto rectangular clay tiles that are now displayed at the Mi’kmaw Native Friendship Centre in Halifax, working to build on the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The project was one of six projects across Canada approved through the Canada Council for the Arts (RE) conciliation Initiative which receives funding from the J.W. McConnell Family Foundation and the Circle on Philanthropy and Aboriginal Peoples in Canada. Stay tuned for our conversation but I would also urge you to get yourself to the Friendship Centre on Gottingen Street in Halifax, and spend some time with these beautiful and important tiles.

44 MIN2016 AUG 22
Comments
Dylan Letendre and Tayla Paul

Sudha Nandagopal

Sudha Nandagopal oversees Seattle’s new environmental justice initiative — one of the only examples of its kind in the country. As program director, she convenes a working group that represents the interests of people of color, immigrants, refugees, and low-income and limited-English individuals in the face of environmental decision-making. Part of this work has been the creation and now, more recently, implementation of the Seattle Equity and Environment Agenda, a groundbreaking new document outlining the ways in which Seattle can begin to pair equity and environment in its work. You should definitely look it up: http://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/OSE/SeattleEquityAgenda.pdf

29 MIN2016 AUG 15
Comments
Sudha Nandagopal

Randolph Haluza-Delay

Describing himself as a father, birdwatcher, and cycle commuter, Randolph Haluza-Delay spent 15 years as a wilderness guide. As a sociology professor at The King’s University in Edmonton, Alberta (Canada) for the past twelve years, he has published over 40 academic journal articles and book chapters, and occasional items for magazines and newspapers. This includes two co-edited books: Speaking for Ourselves: Environmental Justice in Canada (The University of British Columbia Press, 2009), and the recently released How the World’s Religions are Responding to Climate Change: Social Science Investigations (Routledge, 2014). His PhD is in Education from the University of Western Ontario. He also holds a Bachelor’s degree in Zoology and Master’s in Recreation. As a social scientist, his research focuses on social movements, religion and the environment, environmental education, and the cultural politics of sustainability. As a citizen, he is active in peace and anti-racism initiative...

29 MIN2016 AUG 2
Comments
Randolph Haluza-Delay
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