Himalaya: Listen. Learn. Grow.

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Sportshour

BBC World Service

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Sportshour

Sportshour

BBC World Service

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Plays
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Live Saturday morning global sports show with reports, debate and humour.

Latest Episodes

"I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’”

I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’” - Farid Noori on his dream of becoming the first mountain biker from Afghanistan to compete at an Olympics. Farid Noori grew up as a refugee in Pakistan after his family fled the Taliban when he was just two years old. He tells us about his early life in Pakistan, his return to Afghanistan and how he’s hoping to grow the sport in his homeland. Noori recalls going to school in a Unicef tent and being able to see rocket shells and debris that were left over from the war. He remembers learning to ride a bike while waiting in line for bread and he says he hopes his own Olympic ambitions can help pave the way for other athletes from Afghanistan. “I thought my career was over at seventeen and to have gone through this a second time is pretty brutal” – Annabelle Lindsay on the rule change that has ended her international wheelchair basketball career. Lindsay is one of a number of athletes, who have been told their disabilities no longer meet the new eligibility criteria set down by the International Paralympic Committee. She had been hoping to represent Australia at next year’s Paralympics and says the rule change could also see her lose her university scholarship in America. Lindsay took up wheelchair basketball after a serious knee-injury after a teenager ended her hopes of playing basketball. This week saw Australian athletes past and present including – Mitchell Starc, Alyssa Healy, Julie Murray and Bronte Campbell - sleep at the Sydney Cricket Ground to raise funds for homeless young people. ‘Sports Stars Sleepout’ was organised by the Chappell Foundation and its founder – the former Australia cricketer Greg Chappell – joins us to discuss the success of the event and the inspiration behind it. Sporting Witness remembers the late Junko Tabei, who back in 1975 became the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest. As well as being an achievement in its own right, Tabei had to defy the cultural norms in her home country of Japan where women were not expected to be world-class mountaineers. And – with live sport continuing we found out what's happening at the second test match between England and Pakistan and we check in on the latest at the World Snooker Championship. Photo: Farid Noori takes part in a mountain biking event (Credit: Farid Noori)

49 MIN3 d ago
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"I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’”

The NBA returns with LeBron James looking 'in his prime'

Australian ultra-marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel joins us after she swam the English Channel for the thirty second time this week. She’s aiming to break the men’s record for channel crossings, which currently stands at thirty four and received an exemption from the Australian government to travel to the UK amid the Covid-19 pandemic. Former Orlando Magic, Miami Heat and Cleveland Cavaliers player DeAndre Liggins joins us to discuss the return of the NBA and his decision to join the London Lions. Liggins praises his friend LeBron James for speaking up on social issues and says playing in the Florida bubble makes this “the hardest championship to win”. Liggins adds that his aim now is to put British Basketball on the map. Jamaican 1500 meters runner Aisha Praught-Leer tells us she hopes to inspire the next generation of middle-distance runners on the Island so the they can become known for more than sprinting. Praught-Leer also tells us she will be pushing to help change the International Olympic Committee’s Rule 50 – which effectively bans athletes protesting at an Olympic Games – in time for the rearranged Tokyo games. She says: “The idea of not protesting goes against the Olympic Charter”. Olympic bronze medallist Katharine Merry joins us to reflect on the fact she should have been at the Tokyo Olympics now. Merry was due to be working as a commentator over the public address system in the stadium before the games were postponed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Staying with athletics – and this week’s Sporting Witness – heads back to the Moscow 1980 and the Battle of the Brits. Sebastian Coe recalls his epic battle with the country’s other middle-distance star, Steve Ovett, which captivated a global audience. And with live sport continuing - we look ahead to the FA Cup Final by hearing from Arsenal and Chelsea fans across the globe. We also check in on the latest action at the World Snooker Championship. Photo: LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on against the LA Clippers during the first quarter of the game at The Arena in Florida (Credit:Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

49 MIN1 w ago
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The NBA returns with LeBron James looking 'in his prime'

Major League Baseball's first female on-field coach

Alyssa Nakken on making history in Major League Baseball. San Francisco Giants assistant coach Alyssa Nakken joins us to reflect on becoming the first woman to coach on field in an MLB game. She coached first base during this week’s exhibition against the Oakland A’s and tells us she’s grateful for the opportunity but “it’s not like we won a World Series”. Nakken also says she doesn’t feel she’s looked at any differently at the club because she’s a woman. Nakken reveals her “insecurities” lie more with the fact she hasn’t had much experience of “big league level”. The president of the NWSL expansion team set for Los Angeles in 2022 - Julie Uhrman – on the hype around her new club. Uhrman tells us about the club partnering with LA84, being inspired by the City Football Group, attracting players to Los Angeles and the fact her club will allow their players to protest about social issues. Uhrman says: “This started by having a deep interest in pay equity. When something is happening in the world that we are not pleased about they should be able to use their platform in the same way that we should be able to use our platform.” No Olympics in Tokyo but Sumo Wrestling is back – We speak to John Gunning from the Japan Times about the return of sumo amidst the coronavirus pandemic. July’s Grand Tournament was moved from Nagoya to the capital to limit travel during the pandemic. “It’s an understanding that is deeply bonded.” - Lisa Butler and Rachel Levey from Paradise City Dragons discuss how being part of a dragon boat crew has helped them come to terms with living with breast cancer. They tell us how the friendships formed among the crew have helped them emotionally and how the activity has helped their physical recoveries. A film about the team of cancer survivors and supporters from Western Massachusetts is in the running for an award at the PBS Short Film Festival. The Karate champion with the world's smallest pacemaker - Mairi Kerin joins us after she was fitted with the latest version of the world's smallest pacemaker. The three-time World Championship competitor and 2020 Olympic hopeful says the vitamin pill sized device has saved her martial arts career. She had to be fitted with a pacemaker after visiting her doctor after she fainted and says she was shocked to be told she had a problem with her heart. This week’s Sporting Witness goes back to 2010 to chart the story of the Afghanistan men's cricket team. Their journey from the refugee camps of Pakistan to the International stage is one of cricket’s most remarkable stories. Afghan batsman Raees Ahmadzai tells us all about it. Photo: Alyssa Nakken (Getty Images)

49 MIN2 w ago
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Major League Baseball's first female on-field coach

Washington's NFL team agree to change their name

“What story are we telling about America?” – Washington’s NFL team agree to change their name. We discuss the Washington Redskins decision to change their controversial name and logo following years of opposition from Native American communities and recent pressure from major club sponsors. Mark Trahant - who is a member of Idaho’s Shoshone-Bannock Tribe and editor of Indian Country Today - tells us the name was offensive because “it came from the era when natives were sold by body parts”. He also recalls being told by his father as a six year old boy not to use the ‘R word’ and he believes all teams that use Native American words and symbols will eventually have to change their names. The “Washington Red Tails” is among the favourites to be the team’s next name and we’re joined by Martin McCauley, who owns the trademark to that name along with a host of others. The Washington fan tells us all about his unusual hobby of trademarking potential team names, how he won’t stand in Washington’s way if they want to use one of his names and he explains why he’s hired a lawyer this week. The former NBA player calling for the current season to be abandoned - Etan Thomas played for the Washington Wizards, Oklahoma City Thunder and Atlanta Hawks during his professional career. He's now calling on NBA commissioner Adam Silver to cancel the current season due to the risks associated with playing during the Covid-19 pandemic. Thomas says of Silver "Valuing the lives of human beings over economic motivations is a concept that is absent from Donald Trump. You are not him." He also tells us it’s “tragic” that Elena Delle Donne, who suffers from chronic Lyme Disease, was denied the opportunity to opt out of the upcoming WNBA season. 2082 miles on an exercise bike while shielding from coronavirus and battling stage 4 bowel cancer - Keith Farquharson recently completed the 2018 Tour de France course on an exercise bike to raise money for the Sir Bobby Robson Foundation. He chose the 2018 course as that was the year he was first off work with cancer and he watched the race live on TV. He says he juggled the virtual race, with working full-time, a young family and having cancer treatment. We check in on the second test between England and West Indies. Former West Indies T20 captain Carlos Brathwaite joins us to discuss the latest action in the test, the series so far and living in a bio-secure bubble in order to be at the ground. Following a big week off the pitch for Manchester City we’re joined by broadcaster Natalie Paweleck to discuss the club’s FA Cup semi-final against Arsenal, the clubs hopes of ending this season with three trophies and if their victory at CAS could see Pep Guardiola extend his stay as manager. And this week’s Sporting Witness tells the story of David Beckham signing for LA Galaxy in Major League Soccer back in 2007. Image: American Indian Movement protest the Washington Redskins as they arrive in town to play the Denver Broncos at Sports Authority Field at Mile HIgh in Denver, Co.(Getty Images)

49 MIN3 w ago
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Washington's NFL team agree to change their name

The return of international cricket and one man's road to recovery

We go live to Southampton where it is day four of the first test match between England and the West Indies. It has been four months without International cricket and we bring you the latest action from our team who are at the ground. It’s not just listening to cricket that has made a welcome return this week, in the next few hours cricketers up and down the UK will be pulling on their whites for the first time as they are allowed to play for the first time and we hear from one of the players. In January, Mose Masoe, a Samoan Rugby international, was playing in a pre-season friendly match for his team Hull KR and went into a tackle awkwardly. When he woke up he couldn’t feel his legs and told he would never walk again. Fast forward 6 months and he has taken his first steps. We caught up with him and his wife Carissa, who’s about to give birth to their third child. The European PGA tour got underway this week and we hear from caddie Ollie Briggs on what it is like returning to the golf course. A club in Lesotho has become the first top flight football club to announce equal budgets for its women’s and men’s football teams. Puky Ramokwoatsi is the manager of the women's team and shares her story of how she became involved with the club. How will you remember this year in sport? Instead of focusing on what we’ve not seen, we meet someone who shows us what we’re missing. Laurence Griffiths is a Getty images sports photographer. Photo: West Indies players taking the knee before their Test match against England in Southampton (Credit: Getty images)

48 MINJUL 11
Comments
The return of international cricket and one man's road to recovery

Derby day - 'The greatest flat race in the world'

We go live to Epsom in the South of England where the Derby will be held for the first time behind closed doors. Our racing commentator John Hunt will tell us about the importance of the race and we hear from jockey Oisin Murphy who has overcome many hurdles to ride in the big race today. We speak to Lee Kershaw who is a professional Rugby League player with Wakefield in the Superleague. But, like many, with no sport to play, he’s had to look elsewhere for work, away from the sport he loves. He tells us about his struggles. We should be at Wimbledon for middle Saturday today so we hear from Richard Lewis the Chief Executive of the All England Club about how they have been impacted by the Coronavirus and catch up with Georgian player Sofia Shapatava on how her petition to support lower league tennis players is going. Plus Rufus the hawk's handler Imogen Davis tells us how he is keeping busy and how a baby Rufus may be on the way next year. Plus it is time to call time on the humble whistle? Across sport it marks, the beginning and the end and sometimes the illegal moments in everything from Basketball to american football. But in the age of coronavirus, does the whistle face somewhat of an existential challenge, with worries over the droplets we produce when we… blow?!! Ron Foxcroft has refereed an Olympic basketball final and is the inventor of the electronic whistle, he tells us more.. Photo: Kameko ridden Oisin Murphy approaches the finish line to win the Qipco 2000 Guineas Stakes at Newmarket Racecourse (Photo by Edward Whitaker/Pool via Getty Images)

49 MINJUL 4
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Derby day - 'The greatest flat race in the world'

Premier League dreams come true after 30 years of waiting

Liverpool and the end of their long wait for the Premier League title - For some Liverpool fans, seeing their side end a thirty year wait to be crowned English Champions was bittersweet as they had loved ones who didn't live to see it. Mark McVeigh joins us to talk about his son Owen, who died of leukaemia at the age of eleven. Father and son travelled home and away together to watch Liverpool and there's a flag in Owen's honour on the Kop. Mark admits its been an emotional time and he also tells us about the Owen McVeigh foundation, which works with children suffering from Cancer. We're also joined by the Mayor of Liverpool - Joe Anderson - who tells us the club will have a title parade when the time is right. Terry Willis is walking from his home in Alabama to the scene of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis for "change, justice and equality". Willis tells us what happened to Floyd could have happened to him. While, Tamara Moore, who is the only female coach of a men's college basketball team in America, was so inspired by Terry's story that she contacted the BBC World Service. She's since grown close to Terry's family and has even dubbed him the "Black Forrest Gump". They come together to chat about what needs to change in America and how sport can help lead that change. Could Major League Soccer stars refuse to play to force social change? - Chicago Fire forward CJ Sapong joins us to talk about the recently formed Black Players Coalition of MLS. Sapong is a board member and says: "If we are using our platforms to bring awareness to these social injustices but then get on the field and continue to play, have we really provided any change?". Sleeping in the back of a van and trying to find her form after injury - Golfer Sophie Powell joins us to discuss playing in the Rose Ladies Series. Due to the covid-19 pandemic, Powell has been sleeping on a blow up mattress in the back of a borrowed van ahead of playing at each venue. She also tells us how falling out of a moving golf buggy cost her two years of her career. The FA Cup returns without fans - Due to the covid-19 pandemic the FA Cup will be played behind closed-doors this week. Jack Dormer and Alex Rowe had previously been to a game in every round of the competition. They started in the very first preliminary rounds, which were almost a year ago and then followed the winning team in each game until they get knocked out. They then followed the team that beat them. They tell us about their experiences and how they're getting their FA Cup fix this week. And in Sporting Witness, we go back to 2004, when the first All Star Cheerleading world championships were held at the Disney resort in Florida. It was a big moment for a new sport which is about demanding group routines featuring coordinated tumbles and stunts rather than supporting a sports team from the sidelines. Ambrel Brannon, one of the first cheerleading world champions, tells us about a sport that’s becoming increasingly popular around the world. Image: Liverpool fans celebrate winning their first ever Premier League title. (Getty Images)

49 MINJUN 27
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Premier League dreams come true after 30 years of waiting

The Premier League is back and Black Lives Matter

The Premier League returned this week following a one hundred day hiatus due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Ahead of the opening round of fixtures: players, managers, coaching staff and officials took a knee to highlight racial injustice. The BBC's football correspondent John Murray, former Liverpool defender Gary Gillespie and Liverpool fan and broadcaster Lizzi Doyle discuss the significance of English football making its voice heard and the prospect of Liverpool ending a thirty year wait for a League Title in the coming week. Gary was part of the last Liverpool side to be crowned English Champions, while Lizzi wasn't born the last time the club won the League. "I'm behind NASCAR all the way - we are taking baby steps to better our sport" - Brehanna Daniels is the first African-American woman to work pit crew in Nascar, having made her debut as a tire changer in 2017. She joins us to discuss how she got into the sport and why she gives her backing to NASCAR's decision to ban the Confed...

49 MINJUN 20
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The Premier League is back and Black Lives Matter

'You have people wishing death upon another human because they disrespected a flag' - CJ Sapong

Chicago Fire forward - CJ Sapong - tells us he welcomes the US Soccer Federation's decision to repeal it's policy requiring national team players to stand during the national anthem. Sapong - who has played for the US Men's National Team - believes a situation has been created around the national anthem, which equates to: "if you're not loyal to this flag...you deserve to die". He also recalls an incident where his family were confronted at a high school soccer game because someone in the crowd felt he had disrespected the national anthem. "My heart was broken. I'd given up." - Former AFL Star Adam Goodes describes the toll racist abuse took on him and how being abused by a teenage girl during a game set in motion a chain of events that saw him walk away from the sport in 2015. He also speaks about the importance of athletes using their platforms following George Floyd's death. Nessun Dorma and Italia 90 - Thirty years on from the 1990 World Cup, the BBC's Head of TV Sport - Philip Bernie - tells us how and why the song was chosen as the soundtrack to the corporation's coverage. "I was really shocked" - the fourteen year old snooker player given a tour card for the next two seasons by the World Snooker Tour. Ukraine's Lulian Boiko tells us how he got into the sport, what it was like meeting his hero Mark Selby and his hopes for life on the circuit. He was rewarded with a tour card after producing exceptional performances at leading international amateur tournaments over the last year. Powering the NHS - Sam Cox tells us how he's delivered over fifteen thousand meals to NHS hospitals across London during the covid-19 pandemic. The professional boxer says it's his way of giving back after he lost his mother to cancer last year and for the way the National Health Service helped him when he was younger. Due to a growth hormone deficiency Cox was still the size of a six year old boy at the age of fifteen. Super Rugby - The competition returned in New Zealand this week and crowds were able to attend. New Zealand's first female rugby commentator - Rikki Swannell - joins us to discuss how it went. And in Sporting Witness - we tell the story of arguably the greatest upset in the history of the ancient Olympic sport of Greco-Roman wrestling. American Rulon Gardner discusses how he defeated a previously unbeaten Russian champion. It was a David-and-Goliath-style battle that made headlines around the world.

49 MINJUN 13
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'You have people wishing death upon another human because they disrespected a flag' - CJ Sapong

'Choosing to be neutral is the knee on my neck' - Natasha Cloud

Washington Mystics player Natasha Cloud believes the time for silence is over following the death of George Floyd. Cloud says "I fear for my life simply because of the colour of my skin" and that she knows she will suffer racism at some point every day. Cloud adds "that fear is there for every single black American" and says one of her biggest fears is bringing a black child into the world. Cloud says if what happened to George Floyd doesn't "wake you up" it "says a lot about who you are as a human being". "What if I was George Floyd?" - This week more than a dozen of the NFL's top players - including MVP Patrick Mahomes - released a video telling the league that they won't be silenced. It came after the NFL was criticised for it's earlier statement following the death of George Floyd. We speak to former New York Giants player Jason Bell about how the NFL have reacted this week and the fall-out between Saints team-mates Drew Brees and Malcolm Jenkins over Brees comments about kneeli...

49 MINJUN 7
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'Choosing to be neutral is the knee on my neck' - Natasha Cloud

Latest Episodes

"I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’”

I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’” - Farid Noori on his dream of becoming the first mountain biker from Afghanistan to compete at an Olympics. Farid Noori grew up as a refugee in Pakistan after his family fled the Taliban when he was just two years old. He tells us about his early life in Pakistan, his return to Afghanistan and how he’s hoping to grow the sport in his homeland. Noori recalls going to school in a Unicef tent and being able to see rocket shells and debris that were left over from the war. He remembers learning to ride a bike while waiting in line for bread and he says he hopes his own Olympic ambitions can help pave the way for other athletes from Afghanistan. “I thought my career was over at seventeen and to have gone through this a second time is pretty brutal” – Annabelle Lindsay on the rule change that has ended her international wheelchair basketball career. Lindsay is one of a number of athletes, who have been told their disabilities no longer meet the new eligibility criteria set down by the International Paralympic Committee. She had been hoping to represent Australia at next year’s Paralympics and says the rule change could also see her lose her university scholarship in America. Lindsay took up wheelchair basketball after a serious knee-injury after a teenager ended her hopes of playing basketball. This week saw Australian athletes past and present including – Mitchell Starc, Alyssa Healy, Julie Murray and Bronte Campbell - sleep at the Sydney Cricket Ground to raise funds for homeless young people. ‘Sports Stars Sleepout’ was organised by the Chappell Foundation and its founder – the former Australia cricketer Greg Chappell – joins us to discuss the success of the event and the inspiration behind it. Sporting Witness remembers the late Junko Tabei, who back in 1975 became the first woman to reach the summit of Mount Everest. As well as being an achievement in its own right, Tabei had to defy the cultural norms in her home country of Japan where women were not expected to be world-class mountaineers. And – with live sport continuing we found out what's happening at the second test match between England and Pakistan and we check in on the latest at the World Snooker Championship. Photo: Farid Noori takes part in a mountain biking event (Credit: Farid Noori)

49 MIN3 d ago
Comments
"I asked myself ‘if it’s not me, then who is it?’”

The NBA returns with LeBron James looking 'in his prime'

Australian ultra-marathon swimmer Chloe McCardel joins us after she swam the English Channel for the thirty second time this week. She’s aiming to break the men’s record for channel crossings, which currently stands at thirty four and received an exemption from the Australian government to travel to the UK amid the Covid-19 pandemic. Former Orlando Magic, Miami Heat and Cleveland Cavaliers player DeAndre Liggins joins us to discuss the return of the NBA and his decision to join the London Lions. Liggins praises his friend LeBron James for speaking up on social issues and says playing in the Florida bubble makes this “the hardest championship to win”. Liggins adds that his aim now is to put British Basketball on the map. Jamaican 1500 meters runner Aisha Praught-Leer tells us she hopes to inspire the next generation of middle-distance runners on the Island so the they can become known for more than sprinting. Praught-Leer also tells us she will be pushing to help change the International Olympic Committee’s Rule 50 – which effectively bans athletes protesting at an Olympic Games – in time for the rearranged Tokyo games. She says: “The idea of not protesting goes against the Olympic Charter”. Olympic bronze medallist Katharine Merry joins us to reflect on the fact she should have been at the Tokyo Olympics now. Merry was due to be working as a commentator over the public address system in the stadium before the games were postponed due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Staying with athletics – and this week’s Sporting Witness – heads back to the Moscow 1980 and the Battle of the Brits. Sebastian Coe recalls his epic battle with the country’s other middle-distance star, Steve Ovett, which captivated a global audience. And with live sport continuing - we look ahead to the FA Cup Final by hearing from Arsenal and Chelsea fans across the globe. We also check in on the latest action at the World Snooker Championship. Photo: LeBron James of the Los Angeles Lakers looks on against the LA Clippers during the first quarter of the game at The Arena in Florida (Credit:Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

49 MIN1 w ago
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The NBA returns with LeBron James looking 'in his prime'

Major League Baseball's first female on-field coach

Alyssa Nakken on making history in Major League Baseball. San Francisco Giants assistant coach Alyssa Nakken joins us to reflect on becoming the first woman to coach on field in an MLB game. She coached first base during this week’s exhibition against the Oakland A’s and tells us she’s grateful for the opportunity but “it’s not like we won a World Series”. Nakken also says she doesn’t feel she’s looked at any differently at the club because she’s a woman. Nakken reveals her “insecurities” lie more with the fact she hasn’t had much experience of “big league level”. The president of the NWSL expansion team set for Los Angeles in 2022 - Julie Uhrman – on the hype around her new club. Uhrman tells us about the club partnering with LA84, being inspired by the City Football Group, attracting players to Los Angeles and the fact her club will allow their players to protest about social issues. Uhrman says: “This started by having a deep interest in pay equity. When something is happening in the world that we are not pleased about they should be able to use their platform in the same way that we should be able to use our platform.” No Olympics in Tokyo but Sumo Wrestling is back – We speak to John Gunning from the Japan Times about the return of sumo amidst the coronavirus pandemic. July’s Grand Tournament was moved from Nagoya to the capital to limit travel during the pandemic. “It’s an understanding that is deeply bonded.” - Lisa Butler and Rachel Levey from Paradise City Dragons discuss how being part of a dragon boat crew has helped them come to terms with living with breast cancer. They tell us how the friendships formed among the crew have helped them emotionally and how the activity has helped their physical recoveries. A film about the team of cancer survivors and supporters from Western Massachusetts is in the running for an award at the PBS Short Film Festival. The Karate champion with the world's smallest pacemaker - Mairi Kerin joins us after she was fitted with the latest version of the world's smallest pacemaker. The three-time World Championship competitor and 2020 Olympic hopeful says the vitamin pill sized device has saved her martial arts career. She had to be fitted with a pacemaker after visiting her doctor after she fainted and says she was shocked to be told she had a problem with her heart. This week’s Sporting Witness goes back to 2010 to chart the story of the Afghanistan men's cricket team. Their journey from the refugee camps of Pakistan to the International stage is one of cricket’s most remarkable stories. Afghan batsman Raees Ahmadzai tells us all about it. Photo: Alyssa Nakken (Getty Images)

49 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Major League Baseball's first female on-field coach

Washington's NFL team agree to change their name

“What story are we telling about America?” – Washington’s NFL team agree to change their name. We discuss the Washington Redskins decision to change their controversial name and logo following years of opposition from Native American communities and recent pressure from major club sponsors. Mark Trahant - who is a member of Idaho’s Shoshone-Bannock Tribe and editor of Indian Country Today - tells us the name was offensive because “it came from the era when natives were sold by body parts”. He also recalls being told by his father as a six year old boy not to use the ‘R word’ and he believes all teams that use Native American words and symbols will eventually have to change their names. The “Washington Red Tails” is among the favourites to be the team’s next name and we’re joined by Martin McCauley, who owns the trademark to that name along with a host of others. The Washington fan tells us all about his unusual hobby of trademarking potential team names, how he won’t stand in Washington’s way if they want to use one of his names and he explains why he’s hired a lawyer this week. The former NBA player calling for the current season to be abandoned - Etan Thomas played for the Washington Wizards, Oklahoma City Thunder and Atlanta Hawks during his professional career. He's now calling on NBA commissioner Adam Silver to cancel the current season due to the risks associated with playing during the Covid-19 pandemic. Thomas says of Silver "Valuing the lives of human beings over economic motivations is a concept that is absent from Donald Trump. You are not him." He also tells us it’s “tragic” that Elena Delle Donne, who suffers from chronic Lyme Disease, was denied the opportunity to opt out of the upcoming WNBA season. 2082 miles on an exercise bike while shielding from coronavirus and battling stage 4 bowel cancer - Keith Farquharson recently completed the 2018 Tour de France course on an exercise bike to raise money for the Sir Bobby Robson Foundation. He chose the 2018 course as that was the year he was first off work with cancer and he watched the race live on TV. He says he juggled the virtual race, with working full-time, a young family and having cancer treatment. We check in on the second test between England and West Indies. Former West Indies T20 captain Carlos Brathwaite joins us to discuss the latest action in the test, the series so far and living in a bio-secure bubble in order to be at the ground. Following a big week off the pitch for Manchester City we’re joined by broadcaster Natalie Paweleck to discuss the club’s FA Cup semi-final against Arsenal, the clubs hopes of ending this season with three trophies and if their victory at CAS could see Pep Guardiola extend his stay as manager. And this week’s Sporting Witness tells the story of David Beckham signing for LA Galaxy in Major League Soccer back in 2007. Image: American Indian Movement protest the Washington Redskins as they arrive in town to play the Denver Broncos at Sports Authority Field at Mile HIgh in Denver, Co.(Getty Images)

49 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Washington's NFL team agree to change their name

The return of international cricket and one man's road to recovery

We go live to Southampton where it is day four of the first test match between England and the West Indies. It has been four months without International cricket and we bring you the latest action from our team who are at the ground. It’s not just listening to cricket that has made a welcome return this week, in the next few hours cricketers up and down the UK will be pulling on their whites for the first time as they are allowed to play for the first time and we hear from one of the players. In January, Mose Masoe, a Samoan Rugby international, was playing in a pre-season friendly match for his team Hull KR and went into a tackle awkwardly. When he woke up he couldn’t feel his legs and told he would never walk again. Fast forward 6 months and he has taken his first steps. We caught up with him and his wife Carissa, who’s about to give birth to their third child. The European PGA tour got underway this week and we hear from caddie Ollie Briggs on what it is like returning to the golf course. A club in Lesotho has become the first top flight football club to announce equal budgets for its women’s and men’s football teams. Puky Ramokwoatsi is the manager of the women's team and shares her story of how she became involved with the club. How will you remember this year in sport? Instead of focusing on what we’ve not seen, we meet someone who shows us what we’re missing. Laurence Griffiths is a Getty images sports photographer. Photo: West Indies players taking the knee before their Test match against England in Southampton (Credit: Getty images)

48 MINJUL 11
Comments
The return of international cricket and one man's road to recovery

Derby day - 'The greatest flat race in the world'

We go live to Epsom in the South of England where the Derby will be held for the first time behind closed doors. Our racing commentator John Hunt will tell us about the importance of the race and we hear from jockey Oisin Murphy who has overcome many hurdles to ride in the big race today. We speak to Lee Kershaw who is a professional Rugby League player with Wakefield in the Superleague. But, like many, with no sport to play, he’s had to look elsewhere for work, away from the sport he loves. He tells us about his struggles. We should be at Wimbledon for middle Saturday today so we hear from Richard Lewis the Chief Executive of the All England Club about how they have been impacted by the Coronavirus and catch up with Georgian player Sofia Shapatava on how her petition to support lower league tennis players is going. Plus Rufus the hawk's handler Imogen Davis tells us how he is keeping busy and how a baby Rufus may be on the way next year. Plus it is time to call time on the humble whistle? Across sport it marks, the beginning and the end and sometimes the illegal moments in everything from Basketball to american football. But in the age of coronavirus, does the whistle face somewhat of an existential challenge, with worries over the droplets we produce when we… blow?!! Ron Foxcroft has refereed an Olympic basketball final and is the inventor of the electronic whistle, he tells us more.. Photo: Kameko ridden Oisin Murphy approaches the finish line to win the Qipco 2000 Guineas Stakes at Newmarket Racecourse (Photo by Edward Whitaker/Pool via Getty Images)

49 MINJUL 4
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Derby day - 'The greatest flat race in the world'

Premier League dreams come true after 30 years of waiting

Liverpool and the end of their long wait for the Premier League title - For some Liverpool fans, seeing their side end a thirty year wait to be crowned English Champions was bittersweet as they had loved ones who didn't live to see it. Mark McVeigh joins us to talk about his son Owen, who died of leukaemia at the age of eleven. Father and son travelled home and away together to watch Liverpool and there's a flag in Owen's honour on the Kop. Mark admits its been an emotional time and he also tells us about the Owen McVeigh foundation, which works with children suffering from Cancer. We're also joined by the Mayor of Liverpool - Joe Anderson - who tells us the club will have a title parade when the time is right. Terry Willis is walking from his home in Alabama to the scene of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis for "change, justice and equality". Willis tells us what happened to Floyd could have happened to him. While, Tamara Moore, who is the only female coach of a men's college basketball team in America, was so inspired by Terry's story that she contacted the BBC World Service. She's since grown close to Terry's family and has even dubbed him the "Black Forrest Gump". They come together to chat about what needs to change in America and how sport can help lead that change. Could Major League Soccer stars refuse to play to force social change? - Chicago Fire forward CJ Sapong joins us to talk about the recently formed Black Players Coalition of MLS. Sapong is a board member and says: "If we are using our platforms to bring awareness to these social injustices but then get on the field and continue to play, have we really provided any change?". Sleeping in the back of a van and trying to find her form after injury - Golfer Sophie Powell joins us to discuss playing in the Rose Ladies Series. Due to the covid-19 pandemic, Powell has been sleeping on a blow up mattress in the back of a borrowed van ahead of playing at each venue. She also tells us how falling out of a moving golf buggy cost her two years of her career. The FA Cup returns without fans - Due to the covid-19 pandemic the FA Cup will be played behind closed-doors this week. Jack Dormer and Alex Rowe had previously been to a game in every round of the competition. They started in the very first preliminary rounds, which were almost a year ago and then followed the winning team in each game until they get knocked out. They then followed the team that beat them. They tell us about their experiences and how they're getting their FA Cup fix this week. And in Sporting Witness, we go back to 2004, when the first All Star Cheerleading world championships were held at the Disney resort in Florida. It was a big moment for a new sport which is about demanding group routines featuring coordinated tumbles and stunts rather than supporting a sports team from the sidelines. Ambrel Brannon, one of the first cheerleading world champions, tells us about a sport that’s becoming increasingly popular around the world. Image: Liverpool fans celebrate winning their first ever Premier League title. (Getty Images)

49 MINJUN 27
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Premier League dreams come true after 30 years of waiting

The Premier League is back and Black Lives Matter

The Premier League returned this week following a one hundred day hiatus due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Ahead of the opening round of fixtures: players, managers, coaching staff and officials took a knee to highlight racial injustice. The BBC's football correspondent John Murray, former Liverpool defender Gary Gillespie and Liverpool fan and broadcaster Lizzi Doyle discuss the significance of English football making its voice heard and the prospect of Liverpool ending a thirty year wait for a League Title in the coming week. Gary was part of the last Liverpool side to be crowned English Champions, while Lizzi wasn't born the last time the club won the League. "I'm behind NASCAR all the way - we are taking baby steps to better our sport" - Brehanna Daniels is the first African-American woman to work pit crew in Nascar, having made her debut as a tire changer in 2017. She joins us to discuss how she got into the sport and why she gives her backing to NASCAR's decision to ban the Confed...

49 MINJUN 20
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The Premier League is back and Black Lives Matter

'You have people wishing death upon another human because they disrespected a flag' - CJ Sapong

Chicago Fire forward - CJ Sapong - tells us he welcomes the US Soccer Federation's decision to repeal it's policy requiring national team players to stand during the national anthem. Sapong - who has played for the US Men's National Team - believes a situation has been created around the national anthem, which equates to: "if you're not loyal to this flag...you deserve to die". He also recalls an incident where his family were confronted at a high school soccer game because someone in the crowd felt he had disrespected the national anthem. "My heart was broken. I'd given up." - Former AFL Star Adam Goodes describes the toll racist abuse took on him and how being abused by a teenage girl during a game set in motion a chain of events that saw him walk away from the sport in 2015. He also speaks about the importance of athletes using their platforms following George Floyd's death. Nessun Dorma and Italia 90 - Thirty years on from the 1990 World Cup, the BBC's Head of TV Sport - Philip Bernie - tells us how and why the song was chosen as the soundtrack to the corporation's coverage. "I was really shocked" - the fourteen year old snooker player given a tour card for the next two seasons by the World Snooker Tour. Ukraine's Lulian Boiko tells us how he got into the sport, what it was like meeting his hero Mark Selby and his hopes for life on the circuit. He was rewarded with a tour card after producing exceptional performances at leading international amateur tournaments over the last year. Powering the NHS - Sam Cox tells us how he's delivered over fifteen thousand meals to NHS hospitals across London during the covid-19 pandemic. The professional boxer says it's his way of giving back after he lost his mother to cancer last year and for the way the National Health Service helped him when he was younger. Due to a growth hormone deficiency Cox was still the size of a six year old boy at the age of fifteen. Super Rugby - The competition returned in New Zealand this week and crowds were able to attend. New Zealand's first female rugby commentator - Rikki Swannell - joins us to discuss how it went. And in Sporting Witness - we tell the story of arguably the greatest upset in the history of the ancient Olympic sport of Greco-Roman wrestling. American Rulon Gardner discusses how he defeated a previously unbeaten Russian champion. It was a David-and-Goliath-style battle that made headlines around the world.

49 MINJUN 13
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'You have people wishing death upon another human because they disrespected a flag' - CJ Sapong

'Choosing to be neutral is the knee on my neck' - Natasha Cloud

Washington Mystics player Natasha Cloud believes the time for silence is over following the death of George Floyd. Cloud says "I fear for my life simply because of the colour of my skin" and that she knows she will suffer racism at some point every day. Cloud adds "that fear is there for every single black American" and says one of her biggest fears is bringing a black child into the world. Cloud says if what happened to George Floyd doesn't "wake you up" it "says a lot about who you are as a human being". "What if I was George Floyd?" - This week more than a dozen of the NFL's top players - including MVP Patrick Mahomes - released a video telling the league that they won't be silenced. It came after the NFL was criticised for it's earlier statement following the death of George Floyd. We speak to former New York Giants player Jason Bell about how the NFL have reacted this week and the fall-out between Saints team-mates Drew Brees and Malcolm Jenkins over Brees comments about kneeli...

49 MINJUN 7
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'Choosing to be neutral is the knee on my neck' - Natasha Cloud
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