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Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?!

Macintosh & Maud

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Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?!

Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?!

Macintosh & Maud

2
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Plays
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About Us

The podcast where Macintosh & Maud force each other to watch the movies they should've already seen.

Latest Episodes

SCARETOBER 2020: Invisible Man Double Feature

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. STRONG CONTENT WARNING: This episode discusses the 2020 remake of The Invisible Man, and deals directly with domestic abuse, gaslighting, stalking, manipulation, self-harm, self-defense, violence against loved ones, and violent murder. If any of these topics or related topics are harmful to you, please skip ahead to 56:38 seconds to listen to our second review, or hold off listening to this episode until a later date. Please take care of yourselves first. Rarely do we have an opportunity to discuss a movie as recent as this with its source film, which is nearly 90 years old at this point. And in doing so, we may have found one of the best movies of 2020, and definitely one of the best horror movies in recent years. Leigh Whannell is already a bit of a legend in horror circles for his work on Saw, Insidious and the recent techno-body horror-action thriller Upgrade. But his most recent effort is an exercise in restraint and clarity of vision, and in doing so, he’s created a movie more terrifying and anxiety-inducing than anything we’ve seen in quite some time. Meanwhile, its distant cousin is a Hollywood horror classic, though not as well known as the more heralded Dracula and Frankenstein. It suffers from the production limitations of the time, and an almost comic tone that lingers too much to let the real terror shine. But there’s something about the story and Claude Rains that still kept us engaged enough to appreciate its possibilities. We’re watching the 1933 and 2020 versions of The Invisible Man this week on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Attack” from the film The Invisible Man (2020), written and produced by Benjamin Wallfisch. Copyright 2020 Back Lot Music, a division of Universal Studios Music, LLLP. Clips taken from the film The Invisible Man (2020) are 2019 Universal Studios. All rights reserved. Excerpt taken from the theme to The Invisible Man (1933) were composed by Heinz Roemheld and are 1933 Universal Studios. All rights reserved. Clips taken from the film The Invisible Man (1933) are 1933 Universal Studios. All rights reserved.

--2 d ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Invisible Man Double Feature

SCARETOBER 2020: Child's Play Double Feature

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Murder, voodoo, racism, suicide, serial killers, possessed dolls, child endangerment, childhood trauma, blaming the victim, parents not believing children, violence, technological horror, artificial intelligence, gore. On paper, it’s the most ridiculously laughable premise for a horror film. Mom buys kid a doll possessed by the soul of a serial killer, doll terrorizes family, have to kill doll. It sounds like a movie destined for video trash greatness. Instead, 1988’s Child’s Play is a taut thriller with awesome horror elements, and because of the budget and craft that went into the making of the film, the premise is elevated to a pretty great horror movie. In fact, having seen the recent 2019 reimagining, we’re tempted to say the original might hold up better, even with some of its very tone-deaf and problematic material. Both movies play in some interesting and occasionally frustrating waters, but we have to give credit to the filmmakers for these two movies - they’re bold takes on the horror genre. Grab your Buddy dolls as we watch the 1988 and 2019 versions of Child’s Play on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

--1 w ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Child's Play Double Feature

SCARETOBER 2020: Friday the 13th (1980)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Murder, misogyny, “purity” tropes, blood, violent death, mental illness, dissociation, knives and blades, snakes. The fact that we hadn’t seen the mother of all slasher movies weighed pretty heavy on us, so we finally decided it was time to fix that. And wow were we pleasantly surprised. As was most of the country - in a year where John Carpenter’s The Fog and Kubrick’s reimagining of The Shining were dominating theaters, this tiny film became one of the most profitable blockbusters of all time. That’s not to say it’s great cinema; the dialogue is just awful, the editing is bare bones, and it’s definitely limited by a tiny budget. But its story leaves a mark, especially in the final turn, so much so that critics were willing to take drastic measures to get people not to see this movie. Join us for the ultimate cash grab as we watch 1980’s Friday the 13th on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpttaken from “Overlay of Evil / Main Title” from the film Friday the 13th, composed by Harry Manfredini. Copyright 1980. Clips taken from the film Friday the 13th are 1980 Paramount Pictures. All rights reserved.

--2 w ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Friday the 13th (1980)

SCARETOBER 2020: Poltergeist (1982)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Death, haunting, paranormal occurrences, body horror, grave desecration, kidnapping, suggested sexual assault, clowns, skeletons, dead bodies. We’re back from our hiatus and we’re ready to get scary and spooky for Scaretober 2020! This week, we’re kicking things off with a horror film that kinda traumatized children, since it gave Steven Spielberg a one-two “family-friendly” punch at the box office. His credited directing role in E.T. is the stuff of legend, a timeless and timely classic about a wrinkly alien and some very 80’s latchkey kids. He doesn’t receive the same credit for this film, and that’s supposed to be by design, since he hired the man who made The Texas Chain Saw Massacre to go ahead and direct this script for him…or did he? Controversy aside, this is one of the spookiest and fun haunting movies ever made, and will thrill you while having you asking how did this get a ‘PG’ rating??? Forget It, we’re watching the real movie that made kids afraid of clowns - we’re talking about 1982’s Poltergeist on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Carol Ann's Theme” from the film Poltergeist, composed and conducted by Jerry Goldsmith. Copyright 1982 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Film Co. Clips taken from the film Poltergeist are 1982 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

--3 w ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Poltergeist (1982)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Escape from New York/L.A. (w/ Kristin!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussions of violence, death, horror tropes, sex work, misogyny, prison, gore, body horror, war, transphobia, transphobic representation, politics and current events. Kristin Devine of Roll to Play Podcast Network, Powered by the Players, and Christmastide, OH joins us for the mother of all action antihero movies…and its sequel. It’s no secret that John Carpenter hates sequels; he famously refused to direct Halloween II because he didn’t think it needed to be made. Still, in 1981 he gave us an action/horror movie so incisive, direct, and badass that it begged for more of this character and story. Then-child star Kurt Russell broke his Disney mold and sneered his way into movie stardom, paving the way for a generation of jaded, broodier action heroes. Kurt poured himself into Snake Plissken, and there’s no doubt that he’s the reason a sequel was made. But the charm and scrappiness of the first film gets caught in a terrible, recycled script and some of the worst CGI we’ve seen in a major-studio movie. But there’s something there, something that feels even more prescient given the times we’re living in right now - we could really use some more Snake Plissken right about now. We’re finishing off our action series with Escape from New York and Escape from L.A this week on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Main Title” from the film Escape from New York, composed and performed by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth. Copyright 1981 Avco Embassy Pictures Corp. Clips taken from the film Escape from New York are 1981 Avco Embassy Pictures Corp. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Escape from New York Main Title” from the film Escape from L.A., composed by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth, and performed by John Carpenter. Copyright 1996 Paramount Pictures. Clips taken from the film Escape from L.A. are 1996 by Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

--SEP 1
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Escape from New York/L.A. (w/ Kristin!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: John Wick Megasode (w/ Special Guest!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussionsof racism, transphobia, imprisonment and offensive tropes, toxic masculinity, murder, rape, death, plane crashes. One of the reasons we opted to do an action movie series was the specific purpose of watching the movies we’re covering today. The hype has been so massive, and ever-present, that we couldn’t ignore it any longer. And these movies did not disappoint. A lot of the talk is about Keanu Reeves, and rightfully so; these movies are the perfect blend of action, silence, and tension that Keanu is able to play so brilliantly. But the supporting cast, which at first glance could look like stuntcasting, is actually masterful. But it’s director Chad Stahelski, after a long career working directly with Keanu on so many of his best action roles, who really shines in these movies. His sense of action and creating scenes that use few special effects are mesmerizing, and he’s proven in these 3 films he’s a master director. We couldn’t just talk about one; we had to talk about them all, and special Keanu expert Andrew Gormley of Cool Breeze Over the Mountains joins us to wrap everything up. We’re watching the entire John Wick series this week on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Princes of the Universe,” written by Freddie Mercury and performed by Queen. Copyright 1986 Queen Productions Ltd. Clips taken from the film John Wick are 2014 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Clips taken from the film John Wick 2 are 2017 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Clips taken from the film John Wick 3 are 2019, Artwork & Supplementary Materials, TM 2019 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

--AUG 24
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: John Wick Megasode (w/ Special Guest!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Con Air (w/ Claudia!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussionsof racism, transphobia, imprisonment and offensive tropes, toxic masculinity, murder, rape, death, plane crashes. Claudia Elvidge, creator of The Beacon, joins us this week for a discussion of a film renowned for its bonkers quotient. You know, that point where an objectively not great movie suddenly becomes awesome just by the sheer force of will of its cast and crew. This movie is one of the best examples of that phenomenon, bursting with incredibly talented actors across the board being asked to say and do ridiculous things. I mean, your three leads for this film are Nicolas Cage, John Cusack, and John Malkovich, all playing very against type at this point, and all going for broke even though the roles may or may not be right for them. There’s a very, very weird alchemy going on in this movie: its premise is enough to render the entire movie unbelievable, it’s got terrible dialogue and pretty big plotholes, and the director is all over the map on how he’s filming things. But it oddly works - it might be garbage, but it’s really, really fun garbage. We’re watching Con Air on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Con Air Theme,” composed by Mark Mancina and Trevor Rabin and conducted by Gordon Goodwin and Nick Glennie-Smith. Copyright 1997 Hollywood Records, Inc., Disney Enterprises, Inc. Clips taken from the film Con Air is 1997 Buena Vista Entertainment. Clips taken from the film Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood is 2019 Visiona Romantica , Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “How Do I Live," written by Diane Warren and performed by Trisha Yearwood. Copyright 1997 MCA Records Nashville, a division of MCA Records, Inc.

--AUG 11
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Con Air (w/ Claudia!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Enter the Dragon (w/ AJ!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussions of racism and racist action, Asian-American stereotypes, violence, snakes, danger to animals. AJ Ganaros of Straight Off the Top of My Headlines, Shattered Worlds RPG, and Christmastide, Ohio joins us this week to talk about a truly seminal piece of film. That word gets tossed around a lot for a lot of different movies, but it’s very literally true for this movie, in how it spurred the careers of several Hong Kong martial arts legends and proved that martial arts action films could be profitable for Western audiences. But it’s not just this movie’s influence that makes it so interesting - it’s the singular, visionary actor and mind behind it. Bruce Lee’s name is now iconic and legendary, and if you haven’t ever seen one of his movies, it might not be clear why. He’s effortless, graceful, funny, sexy, and altogether singular in how he both chews scenery while also being the coolest person in every room. And despite some significant flaws and constraints, Bruce Lee makes this movie a classic of cinema, let alone action movies. This week, we’re watching Enter the Dragon on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Theme from Enter the Dragon," composed and conducted by Lalo Schifrin. Copyright 1973 Warner Bros Records Inc. Clip taken from the film Enter the Dragon is 1973 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Kid Power” from the movie 3 Ninjas, written by Rick Marvin and William Griffin, and performed by Will Roc. Copyright 1992 Global Film Enterprises, Inc. Excerpt taken from “Fight to Survive” from the movie Bloodsport, written by Paul Hertzog and Shandi Sinnamon and performed by Stan Bush. Copyright 1990 Cannon Films, Inc.

--AUG 4
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Enter the Dragon (w/ AJ!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (w/ Lindsey!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussion of misogyny, child sexual abuse, homophobia, violence, murder. Lindsey Nelsen of Historical Hotties is joining us this week for a movie that is mostly important because it resurrected Robert Downey, Jr.’s career and possibly got him the role of Iron Man. We shouldn’t pretend that wasn’t one of the reasons this movie became a semi-cult legend after RDJ was restored to movie star status. But this movie has some serious bona fides behind it. Shane Black of Last Action Hero and Lethal Weapon fame takes on the screenplay and directing for this movie, and as far as quippy noirs go, it’s not the worst. Val Kilmer is outstanding in a role that demands coolness and razor-sharp timing, and RDJ is a fairly bumbling, unlikeable character that nevertheless is scruffy and charming enough to keep us engaged. But this movie is very much of its time in 2005, and its pretty forward statements on women, romance, homosexuality, and child sexual abuse is both standard fare for the time and also incredibly awful. If this were a better movie, it would actually investigate those tropes and really uproot them - but this isn’t that movie, and it’s pretty galling that everyone was A-OK with the messaging here. It’s time for us to reckon with an otherwise fun movie as we watch Kiss Kiss Bang Bang on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Main Titles” for the movie Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, composed by John Ottman and performed by The Northwest Sinfonia. Copyright 2005 Warner Bros, Inc. Clips taken from the film Kiss Kiss Bang Bang are 2005 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Playing With the Boys,” written by Kenny Loggins, Peter Wolf, and Ina Wolf, and performed by Kenny Loggins. Copyright 1986 CBS Inc.

--JUL 28
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (w/ Lindsey!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Last Action Hero (w/ Becca!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Audio of a gunshot, discussions of violence and murder, police officers. Becca of Magic Folk returns to our show to talk about another truly bonkers movie, and one that is so close to being good. Action comedies were definitely a thing when this movie came out, but this movie amped the satire to its maximum limit, making ridiculously dumb action tropes into high comedy by constantly leaning into them. The performances are mostly great, too, but this movie tanked at the box office, and while it opened against one of the greatest blockbusters ever made, it’s not just unfortunate timing that tanked this movie. A whole team of screenwriters actually hurt, not helped this movie, and especially outside its amazing fantasy world, the movie just trips over itself. It’s no wonder the great John McTiernan really had to rethink making Hollywood movies after this. We’re on a wild ride this week as we review 1993’s Last Action Hero on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Last Action Hero,” written by Brian Wheat, Frank Hannon, Jeff Keith, and Tommy Skeoch, and performed by Tesla. Copyright 1993 Sony music Entertainment Inc. Clips taken from the film Last Action Hero are 1993 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Welcome to Jurassic Park,” composed and conducted by John Williams. Copyright 1993 MCA Records, Inc. Excerpt taken from “Big Gun,” written by Angus Young and Malcolm Young, and performed by AC/DC. Copyright 1993 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

--JUL 21
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Last Action Hero (w/ Becca!)

Latest Episodes

SCARETOBER 2020: Invisible Man Double Feature

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. STRONG CONTENT WARNING: This episode discusses the 2020 remake of The Invisible Man, and deals directly with domestic abuse, gaslighting, stalking, manipulation, self-harm, self-defense, violence against loved ones, and violent murder. If any of these topics or related topics are harmful to you, please skip ahead to 56:38 seconds to listen to our second review, or hold off listening to this episode until a later date. Please take care of yourselves first. Rarely do we have an opportunity to discuss a movie as recent as this with its source film, which is nearly 90 years old at this point. And in doing so, we may have found one of the best movies of 2020, and definitely one of the best horror movies in recent years. Leigh Whannell is already a bit of a legend in horror circles for his work on Saw, Insidious and the recent techno-body horror-action thriller Upgrade. But his most recent effort is an exercise in restraint and clarity of vision, and in doing so, he’s created a movie more terrifying and anxiety-inducing than anything we’ve seen in quite some time. Meanwhile, its distant cousin is a Hollywood horror classic, though not as well known as the more heralded Dracula and Frankenstein. It suffers from the production limitations of the time, and an almost comic tone that lingers too much to let the real terror shine. But there’s something about the story and Claude Rains that still kept us engaged enough to appreciate its possibilities. We’re watching the 1933 and 2020 versions of The Invisible Man this week on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Attack” from the film The Invisible Man (2020), written and produced by Benjamin Wallfisch. Copyright 2020 Back Lot Music, a division of Universal Studios Music, LLLP. Clips taken from the film The Invisible Man (2020) are 2019 Universal Studios. All rights reserved. Excerpt taken from the theme to The Invisible Man (1933) were composed by Heinz Roemheld and are 1933 Universal Studios. All rights reserved. Clips taken from the film The Invisible Man (1933) are 1933 Universal Studios. All rights reserved.

--2 d ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Invisible Man Double Feature

SCARETOBER 2020: Child's Play Double Feature

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Murder, voodoo, racism, suicide, serial killers, possessed dolls, child endangerment, childhood trauma, blaming the victim, parents not believing children, violence, technological horror, artificial intelligence, gore. On paper, it’s the most ridiculously laughable premise for a horror film. Mom buys kid a doll possessed by the soul of a serial killer, doll terrorizes family, have to kill doll. It sounds like a movie destined for video trash greatness. Instead, 1988’s Child’s Play is a taut thriller with awesome horror elements, and because of the budget and craft that went into the making of the film, the premise is elevated to a pretty great horror movie. In fact, having seen the recent 2019 reimagining, we’re tempted to say the original might hold up better, even with some of its very tone-deaf and problematic material. Both movies play in some interesting and occasionally frustrating waters, but we have to give credit to the filmmakers for these two movies - they’re bold takes on the horror genre. Grab your Buddy dolls as we watch the 1988 and 2019 versions of Child’s Play on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive.

--1 w ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Child's Play Double Feature

SCARETOBER 2020: Friday the 13th (1980)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Murder, misogyny, “purity” tropes, blood, violent death, mental illness, dissociation, knives and blades, snakes. The fact that we hadn’t seen the mother of all slasher movies weighed pretty heavy on us, so we finally decided it was time to fix that. And wow were we pleasantly surprised. As was most of the country - in a year where John Carpenter’s The Fog and Kubrick’s reimagining of The Shining were dominating theaters, this tiny film became one of the most profitable blockbusters of all time. That’s not to say it’s great cinema; the dialogue is just awful, the editing is bare bones, and it’s definitely limited by a tiny budget. But its story leaves a mark, especially in the final turn, so much so that critics were willing to take drastic measures to get people not to see this movie. Join us for the ultimate cash grab as we watch 1980’s Friday the 13th on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpttaken from “Overlay of Evil / Main Title” from the film Friday the 13th, composed by Harry Manfredini. Copyright 1980. Clips taken from the film Friday the 13th are 1980 Paramount Pictures. All rights reserved.

--2 w ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Friday the 13th (1980)

SCARETOBER 2020: Poltergeist (1982)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Death, haunting, paranormal occurrences, body horror, grave desecration, kidnapping, suggested sexual assault, clowns, skeletons, dead bodies. We’re back from our hiatus and we’re ready to get scary and spooky for Scaretober 2020! This week, we’re kicking things off with a horror film that kinda traumatized children, since it gave Steven Spielberg a one-two “family-friendly” punch at the box office. His credited directing role in E.T. is the stuff of legend, a timeless and timely classic about a wrinkly alien and some very 80’s latchkey kids. He doesn’t receive the same credit for this film, and that’s supposed to be by design, since he hired the man who made The Texas Chain Saw Massacre to go ahead and direct this script for him…or did he? Controversy aside, this is one of the spookiest and fun haunting movies ever made, and will thrill you while having you asking how did this get a ‘PG’ rating??? Forget It, we’re watching the real movie that made kids afraid of clowns - we’re talking about 1982’s Poltergeist on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Carol Ann's Theme” from the film Poltergeist, composed and conducted by Jerry Goldsmith. Copyright 1982 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Film Co. Clips taken from the film Poltergeist are 1982 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

--3 w ago
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SCARETOBER 2020: Poltergeist (1982)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Escape from New York/L.A. (w/ Kristin!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussions of violence, death, horror tropes, sex work, misogyny, prison, gore, body horror, war, transphobia, transphobic representation, politics and current events. Kristin Devine of Roll to Play Podcast Network, Powered by the Players, and Christmastide, OH joins us for the mother of all action antihero movies…and its sequel. It’s no secret that John Carpenter hates sequels; he famously refused to direct Halloween II because he didn’t think it needed to be made. Still, in 1981 he gave us an action/horror movie so incisive, direct, and badass that it begged for more of this character and story. Then-child star Kurt Russell broke his Disney mold and sneered his way into movie stardom, paving the way for a generation of jaded, broodier action heroes. Kurt poured himself into Snake Plissken, and there’s no doubt that he’s the reason a sequel was made. But the charm and scrappiness of the first film gets caught in a terrible, recycled script and some of the worst CGI we’ve seen in a major-studio movie. But there’s something there, something that feels even more prescient given the times we’re living in right now - we could really use some more Snake Plissken right about now. We’re finishing off our action series with Escape from New York and Escape from L.A this week on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Main Title” from the film Escape from New York, composed and performed by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth. Copyright 1981 Avco Embassy Pictures Corp. Clips taken from the film Escape from New York are 1981 Avco Embassy Pictures Corp. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Escape from New York Main Title” from the film Escape from L.A., composed by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth, and performed by John Carpenter. Copyright 1996 Paramount Pictures. Clips taken from the film Escape from L.A. are 1996 by Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

--SEP 1
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Escape from New York/L.A. (w/ Kristin!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: John Wick Megasode (w/ Special Guest!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussionsof racism, transphobia, imprisonment and offensive tropes, toxic masculinity, murder, rape, death, plane crashes. One of the reasons we opted to do an action movie series was the specific purpose of watching the movies we’re covering today. The hype has been so massive, and ever-present, that we couldn’t ignore it any longer. And these movies did not disappoint. A lot of the talk is about Keanu Reeves, and rightfully so; these movies are the perfect blend of action, silence, and tension that Keanu is able to play so brilliantly. But the supporting cast, which at first glance could look like stuntcasting, is actually masterful. But it’s director Chad Stahelski, after a long career working directly with Keanu on so many of his best action roles, who really shines in these movies. His sense of action and creating scenes that use few special effects are mesmerizing, and he’s proven in these 3 films he’s a master director. We couldn’t just talk about one; we had to talk about them all, and special Keanu expert Andrew Gormley of Cool Breeze Over the Mountains joins us to wrap everything up. We’re watching the entire John Wick series this week on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Princes of the Universe,” written by Freddie Mercury and performed by Queen. Copyright 1986 Queen Productions Ltd. Clips taken from the film John Wick are 2014 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Clips taken from the film John Wick 2 are 2017 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved. Clips taken from the film John Wick 3 are 2019, Artwork & Supplementary Materials, TM 2019 Summit Entertainment, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

--AUG 24
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: John Wick Megasode (w/ Special Guest!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Con Air (w/ Claudia!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussionsof racism, transphobia, imprisonment and offensive tropes, toxic masculinity, murder, rape, death, plane crashes. Claudia Elvidge, creator of The Beacon, joins us this week for a discussion of a film renowned for its bonkers quotient. You know, that point where an objectively not great movie suddenly becomes awesome just by the sheer force of will of its cast and crew. This movie is one of the best examples of that phenomenon, bursting with incredibly talented actors across the board being asked to say and do ridiculous things. I mean, your three leads for this film are Nicolas Cage, John Cusack, and John Malkovich, all playing very against type at this point, and all going for broke even though the roles may or may not be right for them. There’s a very, very weird alchemy going on in this movie: its premise is enough to render the entire movie unbelievable, it’s got terrible dialogue and pretty big plotholes, and the director is all over the map on how he’s filming things. But it oddly works - it might be garbage, but it’s really, really fun garbage. We’re watching Con Air on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Con Air Theme,” composed by Mark Mancina and Trevor Rabin and conducted by Gordon Goodwin and Nick Glennie-Smith. Copyright 1997 Hollywood Records, Inc., Disney Enterprises, Inc. Clips taken from the film Con Air is 1997 Buena Vista Entertainment. Clips taken from the film Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood is 2019 Visiona Romantica , Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “How Do I Live," written by Diane Warren and performed by Trisha Yearwood. Copyright 1997 MCA Records Nashville, a division of MCA Records, Inc.

--AUG 11
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Con Air (w/ Claudia!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Enter the Dragon (w/ AJ!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussions of racism and racist action, Asian-American stereotypes, violence, snakes, danger to animals. AJ Ganaros of Straight Off the Top of My Headlines, Shattered Worlds RPG, and Christmastide, Ohio joins us this week to talk about a truly seminal piece of film. That word gets tossed around a lot for a lot of different movies, but it’s very literally true for this movie, in how it spurred the careers of several Hong Kong martial arts legends and proved that martial arts action films could be profitable for Western audiences. But it’s not just this movie’s influence that makes it so interesting - it’s the singular, visionary actor and mind behind it. Bruce Lee’s name is now iconic and legendary, and if you haven’t ever seen one of his movies, it might not be clear why. He’s effortless, graceful, funny, sexy, and altogether singular in how he both chews scenery while also being the coolest person in every room. And despite some significant flaws and constraints, Bruce Lee makes this movie a classic of cinema, let alone action movies. This week, we’re watching Enter the Dragon on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Theme from Enter the Dragon," composed and conducted by Lalo Schifrin. Copyright 1973 Warner Bros Records Inc. Clip taken from the film Enter the Dragon is 1973 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Kid Power” from the movie 3 Ninjas, written by Rick Marvin and William Griffin, and performed by Will Roc. Copyright 1992 Global Film Enterprises, Inc. Excerpt taken from “Fight to Survive” from the movie Bloodsport, written by Paul Hertzog and Shandi Sinnamon and performed by Stan Bush. Copyright 1990 Cannon Films, Inc.

--AUG 4
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Enter the Dragon (w/ AJ!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (w/ Lindsey!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Discussion of misogyny, child sexual abuse, homophobia, violence, murder. Lindsey Nelsen of Historical Hotties is joining us this week for a movie that is mostly important because it resurrected Robert Downey, Jr.’s career and possibly got him the role of Iron Man. We shouldn’t pretend that wasn’t one of the reasons this movie became a semi-cult legend after RDJ was restored to movie star status. But this movie has some serious bona fides behind it. Shane Black of Last Action Hero and Lethal Weapon fame takes on the screenplay and directing for this movie, and as far as quippy noirs go, it’s not the worst. Val Kilmer is outstanding in a role that demands coolness and razor-sharp timing, and RDJ is a fairly bumbling, unlikeable character that nevertheless is scruffy and charming enough to keep us engaged. But this movie is very much of its time in 2005, and its pretty forward statements on women, romance, homosexuality, and child sexual abuse is both standard fare for the time and also incredibly awful. If this were a better movie, it would actually investigate those tropes and really uproot them - but this isn’t that movie, and it’s pretty galling that everyone was A-OK with the messaging here. It’s time for us to reckon with an otherwise fun movie as we watch Kiss Kiss Bang Bang on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Main Titles” for the movie Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, composed by John Ottman and performed by The Northwest Sinfonia. Copyright 2005 Warner Bros, Inc. Clips taken from the film Kiss Kiss Bang Bang are 2005 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Playing With the Boys,” written by Kenny Loggins, Peter Wolf, and Ina Wolf, and performed by Kenny Loggins. Copyright 1986 CBS Inc.

--JUL 28
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (w/ Lindsey!)

ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Last Action Hero (w/ Becca!)

ECLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER. CONTENT WARNING: Audio of a gunshot, discussions of violence and murder, police officers. Becca of Magic Folk returns to our show to talk about another truly bonkers movie, and one that is so close to being good. Action comedies were definitely a thing when this movie came out, but this movie amped the satire to its maximum limit, making ridiculously dumb action tropes into high comedy by constantly leaning into them. The performances are mostly great, too, but this movie tanked at the box office, and while it opened against one of the greatest blockbusters ever made, it’s not just unfortunate timing that tanked this movie. A whole team of screenwriters actually hurt, not helped this movie, and especially outside its amazing fantasy world, the movie just trips over itself. It’s no wonder the great John McTiernan really had to rethink making Hollywood movies after this. We’re on a wild ride this week as we review 1993’s Last Action Hero on Macintosh & Maud Haven’t Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from “Last Action Hero,” written by Brian Wheat, Frank Hannon, Jeff Keith, and Tommy Skeoch, and performed by Tesla. Copyright 1993 Sony music Entertainment Inc. Clips taken from the film Last Action Hero are 1993 Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from “Welcome to Jurassic Park,” composed and conducted by John Williams. Copyright 1993 MCA Records, Inc. Excerpt taken from “Big Gun,” written by Angus Young and Malcolm Young, and performed by AC/DC. Copyright 1993 Sony Music Entertainment Inc.

--JUL 21
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ACTION-PACKED SUMMER: Last Action Hero (w/ Becca!)
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