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The 1001 Movies Podcast

Sean Homrig

6
Followers
27
Plays
The 1001 Movies Podcast

The 1001 Movies Podcast

Sean Homrig

6
Followers
27
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Every episode we take a look at one of the films listed in the book "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die". From 1902 to 2012, covering practically every genre and dozens of countries, each episode provides a concise and in-depth look at a randomly selected film from the book.

Latest Episodes

Three Colors: Red (1994)

From Joshua Klein, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "The third color of the French flag stands for fraternity, and although the last film of Krzysztof Kieslowski's 'Three Colors' trilogy again remains only loosely connected to that theme, he somehow gets to the heart of brotherhood via the sometimes tenuous and often-impossible-to-comprehend ties that connect all of humanity."

8 minSEP 6
Comments
Three Colors: Red (1994)

Oldboy (2003)

From Karen Krizanovich, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "Mysticism, poetry, school days, and a futuristic bedroom are only some of the wonders found in 'Oldboy'. A thriller that hinges on oedipal taboos and blind destiny, hypnotism, and fate, this breakthrough film - part action, part drama, part psychological thriller - has introduced Korean cinema to more viewers than any other film."

14 minJUL 7
Comments
Oldboy (2003)

The Tin Drum (1979)

From Garrett Chaffin-Quiray, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "An allegory about infantilism, Volker Schlondorff's 'The Tin Drum' is told through thr point of view of Oskar Metzerath (David Bennet), a German boy on the sideline of history. Omniscient before birth, his life becomes the frame for judging adult behavior, especially with regard to troublesome, obsessive sexuality."

15 minAPR 11
Comments
The Tin Drum (1979)

The Seventh Seal (1957)

From Kim Newman, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "The image of a black-robed, white-faced Death (Bengt Ekerot) playing chess on the beach with a weary, questioning crusader (Max von Sydow) is as ingrained in the memory of moviegoers as King atop the Empire State Building, Humphrey Bogart spurning Ingrid Bergman at the airport, Janet Leigh stabbed in the shower, or the Imperial Cruiser passing over the camera."

9 minMAR 31
Comments
The Seventh Seal (1957)

The Piano Teacher (2001)

EFrom Adrian Martin, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "In the clinical, highly formalized manner that has become his signature in such films as 'Benny's Video' (1992), Michael Haneke strips away from The Piano Teacher the romantic lushness of the generic melodrama to expose a cold, alienated social structure founded on abuse."

11 minFEB 3
Comments
The Piano Teacher (2001)

Make Way for Tomorrow (1937)

From Chris Fujiwara, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "In this one-of-a-kind masterpiece by one of the greatest American directors, Victor Moore and Beulah Bondi play Bark and Lucy Cooper, an elderly couple faced with financial disaster and forced to throw themselves on the mercy of their middle-aged children. The children's first step is to separate the two of them so that the inconvenience of hosting them can be divided."

16 minJAN 27
Comments
Make Way for Tomorrow (1937)

Red Desert (1964)

From Jonathan Rosenbaum, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "Michelangelo Antonioni's first feature in color remains a high-water mark for using color. To get the precise hues he wanted, Antonioni had entire fields painted. Restored prints make it clear why audiences were so excited by his innovations, not only for his expressive use of color, but also his striking editing."

9 minJAN 20
Comments
Red Desert (1964)

She Done Him Wrong (1933)

From R. Barton Palmer, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "In the early 1930s, Hollywood - beset with financial difficulties and production problems related to the conversion to sound cinema - turned to stage performers of proven popularity to lure customers back to the theaters. Among the most notable of these was Mae West, whose play 'Diamond Lil' (which she wrote as a kind of showcase of her several talents) was immensely successful on Broadway and elsewhere."

17 minJAN 13
Comments
She Done Him Wrong (1933)

Trailer for "The Best Picture Podcast"

Find "The Best Picture Podcast" wherever you find fine podcasts.

46 s2019 AUG 19
Comments
Trailer for "The Best Picture Podcast"

Le Million (1931)

From Garrett Chaffin-Quiray, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "Rene Clair's 'The Million' opens on a Parisian rooftop. Two lovers flirt and retire to their respective apartments, after which the camera dollies along the skyline to a one-shot sequence using forced perspective, miniatures, and matte paintings. Such a tricky sequence demonstrates a profoundly advanced cinematic style while also revealing how Clair's film is no throwaway musical comedy."

8 min2019 AUG 12
Comments
Le Million (1931)

Latest Episodes

Three Colors: Red (1994)

From Joshua Klein, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "The third color of the French flag stands for fraternity, and although the last film of Krzysztof Kieslowski's 'Three Colors' trilogy again remains only loosely connected to that theme, he somehow gets to the heart of brotherhood via the sometimes tenuous and often-impossible-to-comprehend ties that connect all of humanity."

8 minSEP 6
Comments
Three Colors: Red (1994)

Oldboy (2003)

From Karen Krizanovich, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "Mysticism, poetry, school days, and a futuristic bedroom are only some of the wonders found in 'Oldboy'. A thriller that hinges on oedipal taboos and blind destiny, hypnotism, and fate, this breakthrough film - part action, part drama, part psychological thriller - has introduced Korean cinema to more viewers than any other film."

14 minJUL 7
Comments
Oldboy (2003)

The Tin Drum (1979)

From Garrett Chaffin-Quiray, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "An allegory about infantilism, Volker Schlondorff's 'The Tin Drum' is told through thr point of view of Oskar Metzerath (David Bennet), a German boy on the sideline of history. Omniscient before birth, his life becomes the frame for judging adult behavior, especially with regard to troublesome, obsessive sexuality."

15 minAPR 11
Comments
The Tin Drum (1979)

The Seventh Seal (1957)

From Kim Newman, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "The image of a black-robed, white-faced Death (Bengt Ekerot) playing chess on the beach with a weary, questioning crusader (Max von Sydow) is as ingrained in the memory of moviegoers as King atop the Empire State Building, Humphrey Bogart spurning Ingrid Bergman at the airport, Janet Leigh stabbed in the shower, or the Imperial Cruiser passing over the camera."

9 minMAR 31
Comments
The Seventh Seal (1957)

The Piano Teacher (2001)

EFrom Adrian Martin, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "In the clinical, highly formalized manner that has become his signature in such films as 'Benny's Video' (1992), Michael Haneke strips away from The Piano Teacher the romantic lushness of the generic melodrama to expose a cold, alienated social structure founded on abuse."

11 minFEB 3
Comments
The Piano Teacher (2001)

Make Way for Tomorrow (1937)

From Chris Fujiwara, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "In this one-of-a-kind masterpiece by one of the greatest American directors, Victor Moore and Beulah Bondi play Bark and Lucy Cooper, an elderly couple faced with financial disaster and forced to throw themselves on the mercy of their middle-aged children. The children's first step is to separate the two of them so that the inconvenience of hosting them can be divided."

16 minJAN 27
Comments
Make Way for Tomorrow (1937)

Red Desert (1964)

From Jonathan Rosenbaum, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "Michelangelo Antonioni's first feature in color remains a high-water mark for using color. To get the precise hues he wanted, Antonioni had entire fields painted. Restored prints make it clear why audiences were so excited by his innovations, not only for his expressive use of color, but also his striking editing."

9 minJAN 20
Comments
Red Desert (1964)

She Done Him Wrong (1933)

From R. Barton Palmer, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "In the early 1930s, Hollywood - beset with financial difficulties and production problems related to the conversion to sound cinema - turned to stage performers of proven popularity to lure customers back to the theaters. Among the most notable of these was Mae West, whose play 'Diamond Lil' (which she wrote as a kind of showcase of her several talents) was immensely successful on Broadway and elsewhere."

17 minJAN 13
Comments
She Done Him Wrong (1933)

Trailer for "The Best Picture Podcast"

Find "The Best Picture Podcast" wherever you find fine podcasts.

46 s2019 AUG 19
Comments
Trailer for "The Best Picture Podcast"

Le Million (1931)

From Garrett Chaffin-Quiray, "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die": "Rene Clair's 'The Million' opens on a Parisian rooftop. Two lovers flirt and retire to their respective apartments, after which the camera dollies along the skyline to a one-shot sequence using forced perspective, miniatures, and matte paintings. Such a tricky sequence demonstrates a profoundly advanced cinematic style while also revealing how Clair's film is no throwaway musical comedy."

8 min2019 AUG 12
Comments
Le Million (1931)
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