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Trust Your Creativity

Be vulnerable & understand the process, a course by John Cleese.

John Cleese

John Cleese

Famous English Actor, Screenwriter, and Producer

Trust Your Creativity
  • Overview
  • Episodes
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Overview

The word “creative” is sometimes waved around like a badge of honor. We speak of creativity in hushed tones, as the special province of the “talented”. In reality, the creative process is messy, open, and vulnerable. It’s about listening to subtle unconscious impulses rather than birthing brilliant ideas, fully formed. 

For this reason, creativity is often at its best in a group setting like brainstorming. But in order to work, the group creative process needs to be led by someone who understands it. This person can moderate, creating an open environment in which less extroverted or dominant members feel as safe to share their silliest ideas as the alphas do. This sense of deep trust—that no idea is too silly, that every creative impulse is worth voicing and considering—is essential to producing great work.


What You'll Learn

  • Tune into everyone. You never know where good ideas are going to come from. Great leaders value all contributors.

  • Preserve creative energy. You want conflict of ideas, not conflict of personalities.

  • Allow people to play. There are no silly or stupid ideas. The leader’s work is to create trust so that people can relax and be spontaneous.

  • Balance the group. Act as facilitator. Draw out shyer contributors and control the more dominant ones.

  • Seize the subtle. Creative ideas arise from the subconscious mind, where there is no rulebook.

Episodes

1 Episodes

Understand the Creative Process: Get Your Team in Touch with Their Best Hunches

5min

The word “creative” is sometimes waved around like a badge of honor. We speak of creativity in hushed tones, as the special province of the “talented”. In reality, the creative process is messy, open, and vulnerable. It’s about listening to subtle unconscious impulses rather than birthing brilliant ideas, fully formed.For this reason, creativity is often at its best in a group setting like brainstorming. But in order to work, the group creative process needs to be led by someone who understands it. This person can moderate, creating an open environment in which less extroverted or dominant members feel as safe to share their silliest ideas as the alphas do. This sense of deep trust—that no idea is too silly, that every creative impulse is worth voicing and considering—is essential to producing great work.Tune into everyone. You never know where good ideas are going to come from. Great leaders value all contributors.Preserve creative energy. You want conflict of ideas, not con...

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